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DREW UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



JOURNAL OF THE 

1972 

GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Volume I 



Digitized by tine Internet Archive 
in 2009 



http://www.archive.org/details/journalatlantal01unit 



JOURNAL 

OF THE 

1972 

GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Volume I 



HELD AT 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

April 16-28, 1972 



Edited by 

JOHN L. SCHREIBER, Journal Editor 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 



.AM 

vol.1 



CERTIFICATION 

This certifies that the following pages constitute the 
Official Journal of the 1972 General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church, held at Atlanta, Georgia, April 
16-28, 1972, including the Officers, Personnel, Commissions, 
Committees, Representatives on Boards and Commissions 
that acted during the Conference, or were elected by them, 
proceedings of business, communications, and other mat- 
ter ordered printed by the General Conference. 



The General Conference Secretary 
The United Methodist Church 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Title Page 3 

Certification of Journal 4 

Table of Contents 5 

Hosts, Commission on Entertainment, 1972 7 

Local Atlanta Hosts 8 

Offices and Meeting Rooms 9 

Council of Bishops of the United Methodist 

Church 10 

Conference of Methodist Bishops (Bishops 

OR Heads of Autonomous Churches) 12 

The Judicial Council 13 

Officers and Committees, 1972 General 

Conference 15 

Secretarial Staff 15 

Ballots and Tellers 16 

Standing Administrative Committees 20 

Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 23 

Personnel of the General Conference 28 

Alphabetical List of Delegates 116 

Alphabetical List of Reserve Delegates 134 

Standing Legislative Committees (Membership) . . .154 

Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 179 

Episcopal Address 205 

Journal 

Sunday, April 16, 1972, Evening 223 

Monday, April 17, 1972, Morning 229 

Afternoon 267 

Tuesday, April 18, 1972, Morning 279 

Wednesday, April 19, 1972, Morning 297 

Thursday, April 20, 1972, Morning 322 

Friday, April 21, 1972, Morning 343 

Saturday, April 22, 1972, Morning 366 

Monday, April 24, 1972, Morning 388 

Evening 404 

Tuesday, April 25, 1972, Morning 417 

Afternoon 428 

Evening 439 

Wednesday, April 26, 1972, Morning .447 

Afternoon 463 

Evening 476 

Thursday, April 27, 1972, Morning .488 

Afternoon 504 

Evening 515 

Friday, April 28, 1972, Morning 532 

Afternoon 554 

Evening 572 

5 



Appendix 

I. Vote on Constitutional Amendments 601 

II. Decisions of Judicial Council 605 

III. Devotional Addresses and Sermons 721 

IV. Reports of Administrative Committees 779 

V. Reports of Standing Legislative Committees1038 

VI. Reports to the General Conference 1667 

Index 2075 



HOSTS 

Editor's Note: These addresses are as they were at the 1972 General 
Conference. 

(Italics denote ministers other than bishops) 

COMMISSION ON ENTERTAINMENT 
AND PROGRAM OF 

The 1972 General Conference 
The United Methodist Church 

Chairman: A. G. Jefferson, Allied Arts Bldg., Lynchburg, Va. 24504 

Vice-Chairman: (Facilities) Marion R. Walker, 2751 Poli St., Ven- 
tura, Calif, 93003 

Vice-Chairman : (Program) Irving L. Smith, 3133 N. W. 19th St., 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 73107 

Secretary: Gene E. Sease, Indiana Central College, Indianapolis, 
Indiana 46227 

Business Manager: Norman L. Conard, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, 
Illinois 60201 

Class of 1972 

Bosshardt, Floyd E., 2310 Taft St., N.E., Minneapolis, Minn. 55418 
Bozeman, W. Scott, 411 W. Turner St., Clearwater, Florida 33516 
Chittum, John W., 722 N. Bever St., Wooster, Ohio 44691 
Epps, A. C, 181 Ashby, S. W., Atlanta, Georgia 30314 
Hall, Carl C, 46 Edgehill, Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 
Hole, J. Wesley, 5250 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 90029 
Myers, Paul E., 2908 Union Ave., Altoona, Pennsylvania 16602 
Tuell, Jack M., 401 W. 33rd St., Vancouver, Washington 98663 
Young, J. Otis, 1661 North Northwest Highway, Park Ridge, Illinois 
60068 

Class of 1976 

Beatty, William M., Route 1, Box 734, Hopwood, Pennsylvania 15445 
Cole, Thomas W., 124 S. W. 23rd St., Gainesville, Florida 32601 
Jefferson, A. G., Allied Arts Bldg., Lynchburg, Virginia 24505 
Sease, Gene E., Indiana Central College, Indianapolis, Indiana 46227 
Smith, Irving L., 3133 N. W. 19th St., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

73107 
Strosahl, M. Stanford, 2231 E. Luther Road, Janesville, Wise. 53545 
Walker, Marion R., 2751 Poli St., Ventura, Calif. 93003 

Ex-Officio 

Brawner, R. Bryan (Treasurer), 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 

60201 
Conard, NoT-man L. (Convention Bureau), 1200 Davis St., Evanston, 

Illinois 60201 
Hole, J. Wesley (Secretary), 5250 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, 

Calif. 90029 

COMMITTEES 

Executive: A. G. Jefferson, Marion R. Walker, Irving L. Smith, Gene 

E. Sease, J. Otis Young, Norman L. Conard, R. Bryan Brawner, 

A. C. Epps, J. Wesley Hole. 
Facilities: Marion R. Walker, Chairman; Norman L. Conard, William 

M. Beatty, W. Scott Bozeman, A. C. Epps, J. Wesley Hole, John 

W. Chittum, A. G. Jefferson. 



Program: Irving L. Smith, Chairman; Thomas W. Cole, Gene E. 

Sease, Jack M. Tuell, J. Otis Young, A. G. Jefferson, Paul E. Myers, 

Bishop D. Frederick Wertz, Bishop Paul V. Galloway. 
Finance: J. Otis Young, Chairman; R. Bryan Brawner, J. Wesley 

Hole, Gene E. Sease, Irving L. Smith, Marion R. Walker, A. G. 

Jefferson, Norman Conard. 
Badges: Carl C. Hall, Chairman; William R. Beatty, M. Stanford 

Strosahl. 
Fraternal Delegates: Floyd E. Bosshardt, Chairman; W. Scott Boze- 

man, John W. Chittum. 
Literature: Marion R. Walker, Chairman; J. Wesley Hole, Paul E. 

Myers. 
Guest Seating: A. C. Epps, Chairman; Floyd E. Bosshardt, Carl 

C. Hall. 
Housing: John W. Chittum, Chairman; Thomas W. Cole, Floyd E. 

Bosshardt, M. Stanford Strosahl. 
Seating of Delegates : Officers of the Commission. 
General Conference Secretary Administration: William M. Beatty, 

Chairman; A. G. Jefferson, R. Bryan Brawner, J. Otis Young, 

Gene E. Sease. 

LOCAL ATLANTA OFFICERS 

AND COMMITTEES 

Honorary Chairmen Bishop John Owen Smith 

D. W. Brooks 

General Chairman & Executive Director Gene Carroll 

Vice-Chairman & Legal Counsel Albert Sidney Jonson 

Secretary C. S. Stinson 

Treasurer Wardlaw W. Moore 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Arrangements Division: Adolphus Dickerson, Charles Williams 

Auditorium: Neil Ponder, C. B. Gopher 

Badges : W. Lowry Anderson, John Watt 

Communications : C. A. Scott, Guy Sharpe 

Ushers & Pages: J. E. Lowery, Joe B. Dekle 

Worship Center: Jackson Braddy, Anna W. Robinson 

International Fellowship Center: Charles Jackson, William Starnes 
Equipment Division: Dan F. Brewster, Robert Stovall 

First Aid : Lewis Davis 

Equipment Procurement: Willis Jackson 

Post Office : Wilton Moulder 

Secretarial Personnel : Virginia Dickerson, Jeanne Page 
Program Division: F. W. Montgomery, William A. Tyson 

Communion : Charles Wilson, Jonathan Jackson 

Music: John Dressier 

Pulpit Assignments: Robert V. Ozment, C. S. Stinson 

"Georgia Night": Thomas Whiting, J. P. Brawley 
Entertainment Division : Sam Coker, George L. Zorn 

Coffee Hour: Randy Pollard 

Reception : Bevel Jones, Oswald P. Bronson 

Transportation & Tours : H. Dan Rice, Elroy Embry 

Women's : Caroline Drinkard 
Housing & Registration Division: W. Candler Budd, R. W. Moore 
Finance Division: D. W. Brooks, Louis Rivers 



OFFICES AND MEETING ROOMS 

Room Assignments for General Conference 1972 

Civic Center Building 

Plenary Session Main Hall 

Communion Main Hall 

First Floor 

Bishop's Room Room 100 

Treasurer's Office Room 101 

Council on World Service and Finance Room 101 

General Conference Secretary Room 102 

Daily Christian Advocate Room 103 

Bishops Wives Room Room 104 

Information Counter Lobby 

Registration Lobby 

Post Office Lobby 

First Aid Lobby Room 105 

Transportation Counter Lobby 

Daily Christian Advocate Sales Lobby 

Second Floor 

Publishing House Sales Room 200 

Friendship Lounge Lobby 

Overseas Delegates Lounge Lobby 

Plenary Session Recorder Room 201 

Secretary Pool Room 202 

Press, Radio and Television Room 203 

Daily Christian Advocate Sales Room 200 

UNITED METHODIST CENTER BUILDING 

Judicial Council Bishop's Conference Room 

Commission on Entertainment and Program 4th Floor 

Conference Room 

FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Structure Study Commission 

ST. MARK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
ALL LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES 

Christian Social Concerns Room 101 

Conferences Room 306 

Education Room 204 

Lay Activity and Church Finance Room 305 

Membership and Evangelism Room 206 

Clergy Room 303 

Missions Room 205 

Pensions Chapel 

Communications and Publications Room 202 

Health and Welfare Room 203 

Ecumenical Affairs Room 109 

Judicial Administration, Enabling Acts and Legal 

Forms Room 210 

Local Church Room 201 

Rituals and Orders of Worship Room 105 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND JUDICIAL BODIES 

THE COUNCIL OF BISHOPS 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

President: Bishop Paul Hardin, Jr. 
Vice President: Bishop 0. Eugene Slater 
Secretary: Bishop Roy H. Short, 

EFFECTIVE BISHOPS 

Allen, L. Scott, 502 Gay Street, S. W.; Suite 314, Knoxville, Tennessee 

37902 
Alton, Ralph T., 325 Emerald Terrace, Sun Prairie, Wisconsin 53590 
Andreassen, Harry P., Caixa Postal 68-C, Luanda, Angola 
Armstrong, A. James, Berkshire Plaza, 405 N. W. Eighth Ave., 

Aberdeen, South Dakota 57401 
Borgen, Ole E., Sibyllagatan 18, III, 114-42 Stockholm, Sweden 
Cannon, William R., Methodist Bldg., 1307 Glenwood Avenue, Raleigh, 

N. C. 27605 
Carleton, Alsie H., First National Bank Bldg., Suite 1201, 5301 

Central Ave. E, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 
Copeland, Kenneth W., 5215 S. Main Street, Houston, Texas 77002 
Ensley, F. Gerald, 395 East Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215 
Ferrer, Comelio, 900 United Nations Avenue, Box 756, Manila, 

Philippines 
Finger, H. Ellis, Jr., Room 415, 95 White Bridge Rd., Nashville, 

Tennessee 37205 
Frank, Eugene M., 835 Oleta Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63105 
Galloway, Paul V., 723 Center Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 
Golden, Charles F., P. 0. Box 467, 330 Ellis Street, San Francisco, 

Cal. 94101 
Goodson, W. Kenneth, 1801 Sixth Avenue, N., Birmingham, Alabama 

35203 
Granadosin, Paul, Box 87, Baquio City, Philippines 
Haertel, Armin, 8020 Dresden, Wiener Strasse 56, Germany DDR. 
Hardin, Paul, Jr., 1420 Lady Street, Columbia, S. C. 29201 
Henley, James W., P. O. Box 1747, 127 Lake Hollingsworth Drive, 

Lakeland, Florida 33802 
Howard, J. Gordon, 1701 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

19103 
Hunt, Earl G., Jr., 310 Cole Bldg., 207 Hawthorne Lane, Charlotte, 

N.C. 28204 , „ . ,. 

Joshi, R. D., 13 Sankli Street, Byculla, Bombay 8, India 
Kaebnick, Hermann W., 3 Riverside Office Center, 2101 N. Front 

Street, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17110 
Kearns, Francis E., 1226 Market Avenue, North, Canton, Ohio 44714 
Kennedy, Gerald H., 5250 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, California 

90029 
Lance, Joseph R., 37 Cantonment Road, Lucknow, U. P., India 
Loder, Dwight E., 2111 Woodward Avenue, Francis Palms Bldg., 8th 

Floor, Detroit, Michigan 48201 
Lord, John Wesley, 100 Maryland Avenue, N. E., Washington, D. C. 

20002 
Mathews, James K., 581 Boylston Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02116 
Milhouse, Paul W., 606 Cravens Bldg., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

73102 
Mitchell, Eric, Bishops Lodge, Abid Road, Hyderabad, A. P., India 

10 



The United Methodist Church 11 

Moore, Noah W., Jr., 2641 N. 49th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 
Mueller, Reuben H., Box 88188, Mapleton Station, Indianapolis, 

Indiana 46208 
Muzorewa, Abel T., 3 Marimba Park, P. 0. Southerton, Salisbury, 

Rhodesia 
Nagbe, S. Trowen, Sr., P. 0. Box 1010, Monrovia, Liberia 
Nichols, Roy C, 408 Seventh Avenue, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania 15222 
Pagura, Federico, Seminario Teologio Metodista, Apartado 78, 

Alejuela, Costa Rica, S. A. 
Pendergrass, Edward J., Methodist Bldg., 321 Mississippi Street, 

Jackson, Mississippi 39205 
Pope, W. Kenneth, P. 0. Box 8124, Dallas, Texas 75205 
Pryor, Thomas M., 77 W. Washington St., Chicago, Illinois 60602 
Schaefer, Franz W., P. 0. Box 135, C.H-8026, 69 Badenerstrasse, 

Zurich, Svi^itzerland 
Shaw, A. J., 12 Boulevard Road, Delhi 6, India 

Short, Roy H., 1115 S. Fourth Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky 40203 
Shungu, John Wesley, B. P. 560, Luluabourg, Congo 
Slater, O. Eugene, P. O. Box 28509, 535 Bandera Rd., San Antonio, 

Texas 78284 
Smith, J. Owen, 159 Forrest Avenue at Piedmont Avenue, Atlanta, 

Ga., 30303 
Sommer, C. Ernst, Wilhelm-Leuschner-Strasse 8, D-6 Frankfurt 

(Main) 1, Germany 
Sparks, W. Maynard, 800 Olympic National Bldg., 920 Second Avenue, 

Seattle, Washington 98104 
Stowe, W. McFerrin, 4201 W. Fifteenth Street, Topeka, Kansas 66604 
Stuart, R, Marvin, 2200 S. University Blvd., Denver, Colorado 80210 
Taylor, Prince Albert, Jr., One Palmer Square, Room 341, Princeton, 

N. J. 08540 
Thomas, James S., 1019 Chestnut St., Des Moines, Iowa 50309 
Walton, Aubrey G., 1915 American Bank Bldg., 200 Carondelet St., 

New Orleans, Louisiana 70130 
Ward, W. Ralph, 3049 E. Genesee Street, Syracuse, New York 13224 
Washburn, Paul A., 122 W. Franklin Avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota 

55404 
Webb, Lance, The United Methodist Church, 501 E. Capitol Avenue, 

Springfield, Illinois 62701 
Wertz, D. Frederick, 900 Washington Street, East, Charleston, West 

Virginia 25301 
Wicke, Lloyd C, United Methodist Center, 210 Boston Post Road, 

Rye, New York 10580 
Zunguze, Escrivao A., Caixa Postal 2640, Lourenco Marques, 

Mozambique 

RETIRED BISHOPS 

Barbieri, Sante, Casilla 5296, Correro Central Buenos Aires, Argen- 
tina 
Brashares, Charles W., 422 Davis St., Evanston, 111. 60201 
Corson, Fred P., 2601 Parkway, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19130 
Dodge, Ralph E., 3657 W. Nichols St., Springfield, Mo. 65803 
Franklin, Marvin A., 758 Pinehurst St., Jackson, Mississippi 39202 
Garber, Paul N., 1 Rue de Colombier, Geneva, Switzerland 
Garrison, Edwin R., Carriage Green Apts., C-9, 4507 W. Main St., 

Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 .. „ . ., . 

Harmon, Nolan B., 998 Springdale Road, N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 

30306 . » . „ XT 11 

Heininger, Harold R., 133 W. Franklin Ave., Apt. 7, Naperville, 

Illinois 60540 ^, . ,^ ,^^ 

Herrick, Paul M., 2928 Rugby Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45405 



12 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Holloway, Fred G., 1301 N. Harrison St., Wilmington, Delaware 19806 
King, Willis J., 4834 Prentiss Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana 70126 
Ledden, W. Earl, 4201 Mass. Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 20016 
Love, Edgar A., 2416 Montebello Terrace, Baltimoi-e, Maryland 21214 
Martin, Paul E., Preston Tower, Apt. 407, 6211 W. Northwest 

Highway, Dallas, Texas 75225 
Martin, William C, Quapaw Towers, Apt. 9 M, 9th and Ferry Sts., 

Little Rock, Ark. 72202 
Mondol, Shot K., 425 Dayton Towers Dr., Apt. 7 H, Dayton, Ohio 

45410 
Moore, Arthur J., 1391 N. Decatur Rd., Atlanta, Georgia 30306 
Nail, T. Otto, Methodist Church, Metropole Bldg., 7th Floor, 57 

Peking Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong BCC 
Newell, Frederick B., 41 Crocus Lane, Heritage Woods, Avon, Conn. 

06001 
Northcott, H. Clifford, The Georgian, 422 Davis Street, Evanston, 

Illinois 60201 
Pickett, J. Waskom, 903 Dearborn Towers, 22700 Garrison Ave., 

Dearborn, Michigan 48124 
Raines, Richard C, Glen Glorious, Glen Arbor, Michigan 49636 (June 

1-Oct. 1) 

1438 S. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach, Florida 33062 (Oct. 1-June 1) 
Reed, Marshall R., Box 801, Chelsea Retirement Home, Chelsea, Mich. 

48118 
Rockey, Clement D., 3470 Mill Street, Eugene, Oregon 97405 
Singh, Mangal, 94 Civil Line, Bareilly, U.P., India 
Smith, W. Angle, Terrace House, Apt. 8 F., 3131 Maple Avenue, 

Dallas, Texas 75201 
Straughn, James H., 303 Northway (Guilford), Baltimore, Maryland 

21218 
Subhan, John A, 3-6-29 1/2 Hyderguda, Hyderabad 1, A. P., India 
Sundaram, Gabriel, Humayun Nagar, Hyderabad 28, A. P., India 
Tippett, Donald H,. 45 Southhampton Avenue, Berkeley, California 

94707 
Valencia, Jose L., Methodist Rural Center, Kidapawan, Cotabato 

90335 Philippines 
Voigt, Edwin Edgar, Bay\aew Manor, 11 W. Aloha Street, Seattle, 

Washington 98119 
Werner, Hazen G., 1830 A Helshman Gardens, Carlisle, Pa., 17013 
Wunderlich, Friederich, 34 Grillparzerstrasse 6, Frankfurt, A/M 

Main, Germany 
Zottele, Pedro, Casilla 10222, Santiago, Chile 

CONFERENCE OF METHODIST BISHOPS 

(BISHOPS OR HEADS OF AUTONOMOUS CHURCHES) 

Bishop Carlos T. Gattinoni, Rivadavia 4044, Buenos Aires 13, Argen- 
tina 

Bishop Mortimer Arias, Casilla 356, La Paz, Bolivia 

Bishop Alniir dos Santos, Rua Marques de Abrantes 64, Apto. 201, 
Rio de Janeiro, GB. 

Bishop Sady Machado da Silva, Rua Sao Vicente 100, Apto. 104, 
Porto Alegre, RS. 

Bishop Alipio da Silva Lavoura, Rua Costa Aguiar, 1534 Casa 11, 
Ipiranga, Sao Paulo, SP. 

Bishop Omar Daibert, Caixa Postal, 2009, Sao Paulo, SP. (tempo- 
rary) 

Bishop Oswaldo Dias da Silva, Caixa Postal 1272, Campinas, SP. 

Bishop Wilbur K. Smith, Caixa Postal 2871 80.000 Curitiba, Brazil 

Bishop Hla Sein, 321 Godwin Road, Dagon P. O., Rangoon, Burma 



The United Methodist Church 13 

Bishop Raymond Valenzuela, Casilla 6F, Santiago, Chile 

Bishop Armando Rodriguez, Calle 58, No. 4305, Marianao Habana, 

Cuba 
Bishop Johannes Gultom, c/o Miss G. Robinett, Field Treas., DJ. 

Lit. KoL, Martinus, Lubis, 28, Medan, Sumatra, Indonesia 
Bishop Chang Duk Yun, Korean Methodist Church, K. P. 0. Box 

285. Seoul, Korea 100 
Bishop Yap Kim Hao, 23-B Coleman Street, Singapore 6, Malaysia 
Bishop Alejandro Ruiz M., Calzada Mexico Coyoacan #349, Mexico 

13, D. F. Mexico 
Rev. Ezra Barawani, Ekas Muri — P. 0. Box 21, Jalingo, Nigeria, 

West Africa 
Bishop Wenceslao Bahamonde, Apartado 1386, Lima, Peru 
Dr. Emilio E. Castro (Pres.), Casilla 1773, Montevideo, Uruguay 

(BISHOPS OR HEADS OF UNITED CHURCHES) 

Dr. Andre Pieters, 5 rue du Champ-de-Mars, Brussels 5, Belgium 
Rev. Raymond Garcia, Apartado 727, Santo Domingo, Dominican 

Republic 
Rev. Renee Tufino, United Andean Mission, Casilla 455, Quito, Ecua- 
dor 
Dr. Peter Wong. 191 Prince Edward Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong 
Rev. Mitsuho Yoshida, United Church of Christ, 2-4 Chome, Ginza, 

Chuo-Ku, Tokyo, Japan 
Rev. Seijin Higa, 41-1 Kinjo-cho, Shvri, Naha, Okinawa, Ryukyu 

Islands 
Bishop Estanislao Abainza, Box 718, Manila, Philippines 
Bishop Pedro Raterta, Silliman Park, Dumaguste City J-409, 

Philippines 
Bishop Aquilino F. Guerrero, Box 718, Manila, Philippines 
Bishop Mercurio M. Serifia, Ozamis City M-310, Philippines 
Bishop John V. Samuels, 113 Quasin Road, Multan Gantt, West 
Pakistan 

THE JUDICIAL COUNCIL 

President: Murray H. Leiffer, 721 Foster St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 
Vice-President: Leon E. Hickman, Eckert, Seamans & Cherin, Porter 

Bldg., Pittsburgh, Penna. 15219 
Secretary: Kathrvn M. Grove (Mrs. D. Dwight Grove), 5025 N. 

Marvine St., Philadelphia, Penna. 19141 

Terms Expiring 1972 

Murray H. Leiffer, 721 Foster St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 
Leon E. Hickman, Eckert, Seamans & Cherin, Porter Building, Pitts- 
burgh, Penna. 15219 
Hoover Rupert, 120 South State Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 
Samuel W. Witwer, Board of Trade Building, 141 W. Jackson Blvd., 
Chicago, Illinois 60604 

Terms Expiring 1976 

Theodore M. Berry, 301 G Street, S. W., Washington. D. C. 20024 
Charles B. Copher, 3340 Lake Valley Road, N. W., Atlanta, Ga. 

30331 
/. Ly)id Esch, 4305-B Declaration Drive, Indianapolis, Indiana 46227 
Ralph M. Hoiiston, Mt. Tremper, N. Y. 12457 
Kathryn M. Grove (Mrs. D. Dwight Grove), 5025 North Marvine 

Street, Philadelphia, Penna. 19141 



14 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

ALTERNATES 

Terms Expiring 1972 

Harvey C. Hahn, 334 Ravenwood Ave., Dayton, Ohio 45419 
Farris F. Moore, 2846 Lebanon Rd., Nashville, Tennessee 37214 
Kenneth W. Adams, 1701 Truxton Avenue, Bakersfield, California 

93301 
W. Richard Eschelman, Box 456, RFD 2, Sinking Spring, Penna. 

19608 
Leonard V. Sorg, 9601 Howe Drive, Leawood, Kansas 66206 
W. Davis Cotton, P. 0. Box 719, Rayville, Louisiana 71269 

Terms Expiring 1976 

John A. Dowd, Box 235, Moville, Iowa 51039 

John D. Herr, 409 Osborne Lane, Wallingford, Penna. 19086 

Alva H. Clark, 5410 Corby Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68104 

J. Carlisle Holler, 308 Wade Hampton Bldg., Columbia, S. C. 29201 

Floyd H. Coffman, Franklin County Court House, Ottawa, Kansas 

66067 
Paul V. Shearer, 110 E. Monroe, Washington, Iowa 52353 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES OF 

THE 1972 SESSION 

OF THE 

GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF THE 

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

PRESIDING BISHOPS 

(In order of their presiding) 

Bishop Paul Hardin, Jr. 
Bishop James K. Mathews 
Bishop W. McFerrin Stowe 
Bishop Roy C. Nichols 
Bishop D. Frederick Wertz 
Bishop Reuben H. Mueller 
Bishop H, Ellis Finger, Jr. 
Bishop W. Kenneth Pope 
Bishop Lloyd C. Wicke 
Bishop W. Ralph Ward 
Bishop Ralph T. Alton 
Bishop James S. Thomas 
Bishop 0. Eugene Slater 
Bishop Edward J. Pendergrass 
Bishop Paul A. Washburn 
Bishop Kenneth W. Copeland 
Bishop L. Scott Allen 
Bishop Dwight E. Loder 
Bishop W. Kenneth Goodson 
Bishop Charles F. Golden 
Bishop Roy H. Short 

SECRETARIAL STAFF 

(Italics denote minister) 

General Secretary: J. Wesley Hole (Southern California- 
Arizona) 
First Assistant Secretary: J. B. Holt (Central Texas) 
Second Assistant Secretary, Roll Call (M) : Charles D. 

White (Western North Carolina) 
Second Assistant Secretary, Roll Call (E) : Gene E. Sease 

(Western Pennsylvania) 
Coordinator of Calendar: Hobart Hildyard (Kansas East) 
Legislative Committee Secretary: Hai^old Johnson (South- 
ern California-Arizona) 

15 



16 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Petitions Secretary: Newell P. Knudson (California-Ne- 
vada) 
Document Secretary: Allen M. Mayes (Texas) 
Journal Secretary: W. Carleton Wilson (North Carolina) 
Journal Editor: John L. Schreiber (Southwest Texas) 
Stenographic Pool: Betty Van Dyke (West Ohio) 
Stenographic Assistant: Jeanne Page (North Georgia) 
Office Manager: Shirley Taylor (Southern California-Ari- 
zona) 
Registrar: Irma Kellogg (Tennessee) 
Registrar Assistant: Kay Knudson (California-Nevada) 

BALLOTS AND TELLERS 
TELLERS— GROUP A 

{Italics denote Minister) 

Assistant Secretary in Charge 

Marvin L. Boyd (Northwest Texas) 

Section A 
Regular — Chairman — Joel D. McDavid (Alabama-West Florida) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Kenneth Cooper (Alabama-West Florida) 
6- 7- 8 Robert C. Morgan (North Alabama) 
9-10-11 Millard C. Cleveland (Florida) 
12-13-14 Melvin Finkbeiner (Pacific Northwest) 
15-16-17 Mrs. Albert Curtis (Central New York) 
18-19-20 N. Robert Kesler (Southern California- Arizona) 
21-22-23 Howard H. Darling- (New York) 

Reserve — Chairman — Roy M. Jordan (Alabama-West Florida) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 John Creel (Alabama-West Florida) 
6- 7- 8 Jesse A. Culp (North Alabama) 
9-10-11 William A. Meadows (Florida) 
12-13-14 Marshall C. Hjelte (Pacific Northwest) 
15-16-17 Charles E. Lutrick (Northwest Texas) 
18-19-20 Gordon Martin (Southern California-Arizona) 
21-22-23 Douglas F. Verdin (New York) 

Section B 
Regular — Chairman — J. Chess Lovem (Oklahoma) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Irving L. Smith (Oklahoma) 

6- 7- 8 J. Everett Walker (California-Nevada) 
9-10-11 Robert H. Courtney (East Ohio) 
12-13-14 Aubrey B. Speer (Missouri West) 
15-16-17 Roland P. Riddick (Virginia) 
18-19-20 Carlton S. Dodge (Eastern Pennsylvania) 
21-22-23 Wayne E. Shoemaker (Iowa) 

Reserve — Chairman — S. Covey Page (Oklahoma) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Jim A. Egan (Oklahoma) 

6- 7- 8 Robert Moon (California-Nevada) 
9-10-11 John Chittum (East Ohio) 
12-13-14 Keymeth C. Johnston (Missouri West) 
15-16-17 John H. Rixse, Jr. (Virginia) 



The United Methodist Church 17 

18-19-20 George S. Wood (Louisville) 
21-22-23 Maurice K. Long (Iowa) 

Section C 
Regular — Chairman — David L. Stanley (Southern Illinois) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Harry M. Gordon (Wyoming) 
6- 7- 8 Henry High (Virginia) 
9-10-11 Donald Waterfield (Troy) 
12-13-14 Paul Hagiya (Rocky Mountain) 
15-16-17 Ben Richer (West Ohio) 
18-19-20 Alva H. Clark (Nebraska) 
21-22-23 Harry R. Kent (South Carolina-1785) 

Reserve — Chairman — Robert R. Hollis (Southern Illinois) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Philip N. Pitcher (Wyoming) 

6- 7- 8 Mrs. Richard Hoffman (West Virginia) 
9-10-11 Wilbur C. Ziegler (Southern New England) 
12-13-14 Joe Ariki (Rocky Mountain) 
15-16-17 John K. Bergland (West Ohio) 
18-19-20 G. Alan Dunlap (Nebraska) 
21-22-23 Wallace Fridy (South Carolina-1785) 

Section D 
Regular — Chair-man — A. C. Epps (Georgia) 

Rows 3- 4- 5 Lloyd M. Bertholf (Central Illinois) 
6- 7- 8 William J. Neese (North Carolina) 
9-10-11 Bert Jordan (Mississippi) 
12-13-14 Paul E. Myers (Central Pennsylvania) 
15-16-17 John Van Sickle (Northern Illinois) 
18-19-20 Frank A. Settle (Holston) 
21-22-23 Harold M. Karls (Detroit) 

Reserve — Chairman — David W. Brooks (North Georgia) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Dale E. Pitcher (Central Illinois) 
6- 7- 8 J. Nelson Gibson (North Carolina) 
9-10-11 Frank E. Dement (Mississippi) 
12-13-14 Mrs. Frank Ake (Central Pennsylvania) 
15-16-17 William D. White (Northern Illinois) 
18-19-20 John T. Lundy (Holston) 
21-22-23 Jesse R. DeWitt (Detroit) 



TELLERS— GROUP B 

(Italics denote Minister) 

Assistant Secretary in Charge 
William M. Beatty (Western Pennsylvania) 

Section A 
Regular — Chairman — William R. Keeffe (New Hampshire) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Forest W. Laraba (New Hampshire) 
6- 7- 8 Vernon Lee (Northern New York) 
9-10-11 W. Scott Bozeman (Florida) 
12-13-14 Don L. Strickland (Texas) 

15-16-17 Thomas K. Farley (Southern California-Arizona) 
18-19-20 Thurman Dodson (Baltimore) 
21-22-23 Sidney Roberts (Central Texas) 



18 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Reserve — Chairman — Ervin Ortman (South Dakota) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Richard Pittenger (South Dakota) 

6- 7- 8 Allison C. Wood (Northern New York) 
9-10-11 Mrs. Olive E. Watson (Florida) 
12-13-14 Wayne H. McCleskey (Texas) 
15-16-17 David L. Myers (Southern California- Arizona) 
18-19-20 Edward G. Carroll (Baltimore) 
21-22-23 Roy J. Grogan (Central Texas) 

Section B 
Regular — Chairman — John C. Soderberg (Yellowstone) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Grace Catterall (California-Nevada) 
6- 7- 8 David A. Duck (South Georgia) 
9-10-11 Harold Totten (Kansas West) 
12-13-14 Byron Stroh (South Indiana) 
15-16-17 William T. Robey, Jr. (Virginia) 
18-19-20 Kenneth Rutter (Western Pennsylvania) 
21-22-23 John R. Harper (Eastern Pennsylvania) 

Reserve — Chairman — William C. Doenges (Oklahoma) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Arthur V. Thurman (California-Nevada) 
6- 7- 8 George W. Mayo (South Georgia) 
9-10-11 Glenn E. Matthew (Kansas West) 
12-13-14 Francis Wilcoxon (South Indiana) 
15-16-17 Eric W. Baker (Great Britain) 
18-19-20 Mrs. Thomas DeVaux (Western Pennsylvania) 
21-22-23 F. Lewis Walley (Eastern Pennslvania) 

Section C 
Regular — Chairman — Donald E. Holbrook (West Michigan) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Alden B. Bums (West Michigan) 

6- 7- 8 Edwin C. Ford (Western North Carolina) 
9-10-11 Luther A. Patton (Troy) 
12-13-14 Erwin H. Schwiebert (Oregon-Idaho) 
15-16-17 Zan W. Holmes, Jr. (North Texas) 
18-19-20 Hubert M. Blanchard (Louisiana) 
21-22-23 Merle A. Dunn (Minnesota) 

Reserve — Chairman — Keith L Pohl (West Michigan) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Mrs. Harold Newman (West Michigan) 

6- 7- 8 H. Claude Young (Western North Carolina) 
9-10-11 Earle N. Cooper (Troy) 
12-13-14 Gene Albertson (Oregon-Idaho) 
15-16-17 Mrs. Wayne A. Lamb (Memphis) 
18-19-20 Jack Cooke (Louisiana) 
21-22-23 Dorothy R. Gridley (Minnesota) 

Section D 
Regular — Chairman — William H. Ruff (North Georgia) 
Rows 3- 4- 5 Charles E. Wilson, Jr. (North Georgia) 
6- 7- 8 Carl C. Hall (Little Rock) 
9-10-11 G. Wayne Cuff (Peninsula) 
12-13-14 John T. King (Southwest Texas) 
15-16-17 Willie B. Clay (Northern Illinois) 
18-19-20 Clifford Lau (Wisconsin) 
21-22-23 Gerald H. Jones (North Indiana) 



The United Methodist Church 19 

Reserve — Chairman — Joe B, Dekle (North Geor^a) 

Rows 3- 4- 5 Mrs. R. M. McCommons (North Georgia) 
6- 7- 8 C. Ray Hozendorf (Little Rock) 
9-10-11 James C. Hardcastle (Peninsula) 
12-13-14 Ted Richardson (Southwest Texas) 
15-16-17 Merrill Gates (Northern Illinois) 
18-19-20 Winslow Wilson (Wisconsin) 
21-22-23 George Davis (North Indiana) 

DAILY CHRISTIAIS ADVOCATE 

Ewing T. Wayland Editor 

William C. Henzlik Managing Editor 

John A. Lovelace News Editor 

Sandra Leneau Assistant Editor 

James A. Miner Assistant Editor 

Ira M. Mohler Assistant Editor 

Gail Yeiser Assistant Editor 

John E. Procter Publisher 

Warren P. Clark Business Manager 

Institutional Electronics, Inc Official Reporters 



STANDING ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 

{Italics denote Minister) 

AGENDA 

Chairman: J. Otis Young (West Ohio) Commission on Entertainment 

and Program 
Vice-Chairman: Edward Tullis (Kentucky) At Large 
Secretary: Alva H. Clark (Nebraska) 
Members: David W. Brooks (North Georgia) 

Thomas Bryant (South Indiana) 

Annette Hutchins (Youth) 

Thomas P. Moore (East Ohio) At Large 

Tom Reavley (Southwest Texas) At Large 

Douglas F. Verdin (New York) 

Frank Webber (California-Nevada) 

Louise Werder (North Katanga) 

CALENDAR 

Chairman: Robert E. Goodrich (North Texas) 

V ice-Chairman: Wayne F. Calbert (Mississippi-FCJ) 

Secretary: Mrs. Paul Braun (Iowa) 

Member: Wanda Walls (Youth) 

CORRELATION AND EDITORIAL REVISION 

Chairman: Emory Bucke (Southern New England) ex officio 
Vice-Chairman: Curtis A. Chambers (Eastern Pennsylvania) 
Secretary: Dennis R. Fletcher (Eastern Pennsylvania) 
Members: J. Clair Jarvis (West Virginia) 
Bradshaw Mintener (Baltimore) 

COURTESIES AND PRIVILEGES 

Chairman: Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) 
Vice-Chairman: Wilbur C hoy (California-Nevada) 
Secretary: William R. Henry (Oklahoma) At Large 
Members: Roy D. Barton (Rio Grande) 

Ignacio P. Bautista (Philippines) 

Edward G. Carroll (Baltimore) 

James Dolliver (Pacific Northwest) At Large 

Mrs. E. L. Ferris (Nebraska) 

Mrs. Ellen Hanna (Central Illinois) 

Mrs. Dora Hoffman (West Virginia) 

Grantas E. Hoopert (Central Pennsylvania) At Large 

Mrs. W. Roy Parker (South Carolina-1785) 

I. P. Presley (Upper Mississippi) At Large 

Wayne E. Shoemaker (Iowa) 

Robert L. Wilcox (Holston) 

Mrs. Maria Wunderlich (Southwest Germany) 

CREDENTIALS 

Chairman: W. T. Handy, Jr. (Louisiana) 

V ice-Chairman: F annuel Kadenge (Rhodesia) 

Secretary: Mrs. George V. Metzel (Oklahoma) 

Members: Clair W. Black (Northern New Jersey) 

Charles L. Hutchinson (Central Alabama) 
Joseph T. Johnson (Northern Illinois) 
Kazuo Saito (Southern California-Arizona) 

20 



The United Methodist Church 21 

FRATERNAL DELEGATES 

Chairman: Harvey H. Potthoff (Rocky Mountain) 
Vice-Chairman: Mrs. Marshall Smith (Mississippi) At Large 
Secretary: George F. Williams (Southern California- Arizona) At 
Large 

Members: Mrs. Thomas DeVaux (Western Pennsylvania) 
Henry R. High (West Virginia) At Large 
Ralph B. Huston (Florida) 
John T. King (Southwest Texas) 
Robert W. Thornburg (Central Illinois) 

COMMISSION ON THE GENERAL CONFERENCE 
1976 GENERAL CONFERENCE 

Chairman : Gene E. Sease 

Vice-Chairman: (Facilities) William M. Beatty 
V ice-Chairman: (Program) Jack M. Tuell 
Secretary : J. Wesley Hole 

Members: 

Class of 1976: 

Beatty, William M. (Western Pennsylvania) 

Cole, Thomas W. (Florida) At Large 

Jefferson, A. G. (Virginia) 

Sease, Gene E. (Western Pennsylvania) At Large 

Smith, Irving L. (Oklahoma) 

Strosahl, M. Stanford (Wisconsin) 

Walker, Marion R. (Southern California-Arizona) 

Class of 1980: 

Bozeman, W. Scott (Florida) 
Epps, Anderson C. (North Georgia) 
Hall, Carl C. (Little Rock) 
Larson, Mrs. Norma (Minnesota) 
Shearer, Daniel L. (Central Pennsylvania) 
Tuell, JackM. (Pacific Northwest) 
Woodring, DeWayne S. (East Ohio) 

Ex Officio : 

Brawner, R. Bryan, Treasurer 

Conard, Norman L., Business Manager (California- 
Nevada) 
Holt, J. B., Secretary (Central Texas) 

JOURNAL 

Chairman: George R. Akers (Wyoming) 
Vice-Chairman: Frede Johansen (Denmark) 
Secretary: Mrs. Lamar Clark (Texas) 

Members: Ronald R. Hamilton (Rocky Mountain) 
David F. Knecht (North Dakota) 
L. D. Lusby (Holston) 
V/endell P. Taylor (Mississippi-FCJ) 

PLAN OF ORGANIZATION AND RULES OF ORDER 

Chairman: Leonard D. Slutz (West Ohio) 
Vice-Chairman: Mrs. Norma Eby (Pacific Northwest) 
Secretary: Thovias L. Cromwell (East Ohio) 



22 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Members: Will M. Hildehrand (Southern California-Arizona) 
J. B. Holt (Central Texas) Ex Officio 
C. Ray Hozendorf (Little Rock) 
George E. Jones (Mississippi) 
Robert E. Knupp (Central Pennsylvania) 
Lydia Meinhardt (West Berlin) 
S. Covey Page (Oklahoma) 
Melvin G. Talbert (Southern California-Arizona) 

PRESIDING OFFICERS 

Chairman: Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) 
Vice-Chairman: Woodie W. White (Detroit) At Large 
Secretary: Mrs. Elizabeth Watson (Oregon-Idaho) 

Members: Harold L. Boda (West Ohio) 
Martin Doering (West Berlin) 
Paul G. Gilmore (Central Pennsylvania) 
Harold O. Harriger (Northwest Texas) 
Maggart B. Howell (Central Texas) 

John D. Humphrey, Sr. (North Mississippi) At Large 
J. Chess Lovern (Oklahoma) At Large 
M.Elia Peter (Hyderabad) 
Harry Schneidereit (German Democratic Republic) At 

Large 
Byron F. Stroh (South Indiana) 
L. Stacy Weaver (North Carolina) 
C. Dale White (Southern New England) 
Charles D. White (Western North Carolina) 

REFERENCE 

Chairman: Jerry G. Bray (Virginia) 

Vice-Chairman: M. Max Wright (Kansas East) 

Secretary: Mrs. Frank Ake (Central Pennsylvania) At Large 

Members: Edsel A. Ammons (Northern Illinois) At Large 
Pauline Bobbitt (Southern California-Arizona) 
Harold L. Boda (West Ohio) 
Wayne Coffin (Oklahoma) At Large 
Melvin M. Finkbeiner (Pacific Northwest) 
James A. Fisher, Sr. (Memphis) 
Wallace Fridy (South Carolina-1785) At Large 
Arnold Madsen (Norway) 
Kenneth A. McCall (Missouri West) 
Abdon Mendigorin (Philippines) 
Charles A. Sayre (Southern New Jersey) 
Charles F. Schoenlein (Northern New York) 
James W. Wright (West Michigan) 



INTERJURISDICTIONAL COMMITTEE 
ON EPISCOPACY 

(Par. 612.1 — "The persons elected by their respective delegations 
to serve on the several Jurisdictional Committees on Episcopacy 
shall meet jointly at the time of the General Conference, constituting 
an Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy, not later than the 
fifth day of the Conference session and at the time and place set for 
their convening by the president of the Council of Bishops, and shall 
elect from their number a chairman, vice-chairman and secretary. 
The function of this Joint Committee shall be to discuss the possibility 
of transfers of bishops across jurisdictional lines at the forthcoming 
Jurisdictional Conferences, for residential and presidential responsibi- 
lities in the ensuing quadrennium. It shall elect an Executive Commit- 
tee consisting of the officers named above and two ministers and two 
laymen from each jurisdictional committee, elected by that com- 
mittee, to conduct consultations with bishops and others interested 
in possible episcopal transfers. The Executive Committee shall be 
responsible to the Interjurisdictional Committee.") 

NORTHEASTERN JURISDICTION 

(Italics denote ministerial members) 

Adkins, Leon M., Jr Troy 

Andrews, David H Baltimore 

Ault, James M Northern New Jersey 

Black, Clair W Northern New Jersey 

Blackstone, Franklin, Jr Western Pennsylvania 

Blessing, Roy E West Virginia 

Bridges, Ramsey West Virginia 

Cabrera, Ismail Puerto Rico 

Caldwell, Gilbert H., Jr Southern New England 

Chapman, A. Frank Peninsula 

Cooke, George Western New York 

Cooke, R. Jervis Peninsula 

Danforth, Merrill A Maine 

Eckel, Sherman B Western New York 

Ellis, S. Blake Maine 

Harper, John R Eastern Pennsylvania 

James, William M New York 

Jones, Everett Baltimore 

Keeffe, William R New Hampshire 

Knupp, Robert E Central Pennsylvania 

Laraba, Forest W New Hampshire 

Long, Richard B Wyoming 

Mann, Robert Central New York 

McCune, Robert J Central New York 

Mentzer, Warren F Eastern Pennsylvania 

23 



24 Journal of the 1972 General Cofiference 

Ogden, Mrs. Tarrance F Troy 

Preusch, Robert "W New York 

Rutter, Kenneth P Western Pennsylvania 

Santana, Benjamin Puerto Rico 

Sayre, Charles A Southern New Jersey 

Schoenlein, Charles F Northern New York 

Shearer, Daniel L Central Pennsylvania 

Singer, Edgar F. Wyoming 

Smith, Harold Southern New England 

Van Ornum, Carlton Northern New York 

Walker, Leon E Southern New Jersey 

NORTH CENTRAL JURISDICTION 

Ammerman, Carl R Detroit 

Baskerville, Trevor Iowa 

Burrous, Kermit North Indiana 

Colpitis, A. Hunter North Indiana 

Courtney, Robert H East Ohio 

DeWitt, Jesse R Detroit 

Fechtig, Norman Southern Illinois 

Forbes, J. Kenneth South Indiana 

Green, Mrs. Robert South Indiana 

Hottle, Darrell West Ohio 

Knecht, David F North Dakota 

Lang, Francis East Ohio 

Lennartson, Walter S Northern Illinois 

Messmer, William K West Ohio 

Moore, Eugene J Central Illinois 

Northfelt, Merlyn W Northern Illinois 

Ortman, Ervin South Dakota 

Pittenger, Richard D South Dakota 

Purdham, Charles Minnesota 

Roberts, Leigh Wisconsin 

Schilling, Marvin A Wisconsin 

Schreiber, Lyle Minnesota 

Shearer, Paul V Iowa 

Sims, R. Paul Southern Illinois 

Sundin. Robert North Dakota 



The United Methodist Church 25 

Taylor, Lawrence R West Michigan 

Tombaugh, Reid R Central Illinois 

Wilcox, Katherine W West Michigan 

SOUTHEASTERN JURISDICTION 

Adams, Quenton D Central Alabama 

Bray, Jerry G., Jr Virginia 

Brooks, D, W North Georgia 

Calbert, Wayne F Mississippi (FCJ) 

Epps, A. C Georgia 

Fields, Richard E South Carolina (1866) 

Fisher, James A., Sr Memphis 

Ford, Floyd Tennessee 

Foster, George A Florida 

Freeman, G. Ross South Georgia 

Graham, John Upper Mississippi 

Grant, N. W North Carolina 

Hager, Cornelius R Kentucky 

Hildreth, Charles H Alabama-West Florida 

Houston, Jamie G., Jr North Mississippi 

Hundley, George North Alabama 

Hutchinson, Charles L Central Alabama 

Jenkins, Tom Louisville 

Jenkins, Warren M South Carolina (1866) 

Jordan, Roy Alabama- West Florida 

Kent, Harry R South Carolina (1785) 

Kimhrough, R. Edivin North Alabama 

King, Mrs. Carl H Western North Carolina 

Leggett, J. Willard, Jr Mississippi 

Mann, Mrs. Harold L North Carolina 

Meadows, William A Florida 

Peters, James C Western North Carolina 

Pevahouse, Joe N Memphis 

Presley, I. P Upper Mississippi 

Ruff, W. H North Georgia 

Sanders, Carl J Virginia 

Satterfield, John C Mississippi 

Steffner, John Holston 

Stokes, Mack B Holston 

Sweazy, Albert W Kentucky 

Taylor, Eben South Carolina (1785) 

Taylor, Wendell P Mississippi (FCJ) 

Tomlin, William H • Tennessee 



26 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Wilson, T. R Geor^a 

Wood, George S Louisville 

Wright, George A South Georgia 

Yarbrough, George M North Mississippi 

SOUTH CENTRAL JURISDICTION 

Aviiia, Mike Rio Grande 

Baker, Leo North Texas 

Barton, Roy D Rio Grande 

Borger, Clarence Kansas West 

Boyd, Marvin Northwest Texas 

Bumpers, Clay North Arkansas 

Butler, Randle New Mexico 

Caswell, Bervin New Mexico 

Clark, Alva H Nebraska 

Coffman, Floyd H Kansas East 

Cooper, Joel North Arkansas 

Dixon, Ernest T., Jr Southwest Texas 

Doenges, William C Oklahoma 

Doggett, John N Missouri East 

Fenn, G. Lemuel Oklahoma 

Gailey, Mrs. Beulah Missouri West 

Goens, Ray Texas 

Greenwaldt, William M Central Texas 

Grogan, Roy J Central Texas 

Hall, Carl C Little Rock 

Hardt, John Wesley Texas 

Harriger, Harold O Northwest Texas 

Hawkins, J. Clinton Missouri East 

Hayes, Clara J Kansas East 

Hozendorf, C. Ray Little Rock 

Lester, W. D Southwest 

Matheny, Tom H Louisiana 

Oliphint, Benjamin R Louisiana 

Preston, Mrs. Alice Southwest 

Rupert, Thomas W Kansas West 

Trice, William E North Texas 

Urbom, Warren K Nebraska 

Walker, James M Southwest Texas 

Ward, A. Sterling Missouri West 

WESTERN JURISDICTION 

Bobbitt, Pauline Southern California-Arizona 

Burtner, Robert W Oregon-Idaho 



The United Methodist Church 27 

Choy, Wilbur W California-Nevada 

Eby, Mrs. Norma C Pacific Northwest 

Hood, Esther Yellowstone 

Naylor, Edward R Rocky Mountain 

Potthoff, Harvey H Rocky Mountain 

Schwiebert, Erwin H Oregon-Idaho 

Soderberg, John C Yellowstone 

Talbert, Melvin G Southern California-Arizona 

Tuell, Jack M Pacific Northwest 

Webber, Frank California-Nevada 



PERSONNEL OF 

THE 1972 SESSION 

OF THE 

GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

VOTING DELEGATES 

The Annual Conferences are here listed alphabetically by Annual 
Conferences and the names of the delegates appear as they were 
furnished by the secretaries of the respective Annual Conferences 
with the names of ministerial delegates and reserves in italics. The 
chairman of the delegation is indicated by an asterisk (*). Number in 
( ) indicates Legislative Committee assignment. (M) or (E) denotes 
former church affiliation. 

The figure after each Annual Conference heading is the number of 
delegates in the delegation and is followed by the abbreviation for its 
Jurisdiction or OS for Conferences outside the United States. 

AGRA (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 10, Seats 10-11 
*Sagar, Sisa Masih; (11) (M) Area Secretary; 4-B Battery Lane, 

Delhi 6, India 
Barnes, Ambrose; (4) (M) Business; Methodist Mission District 

Headquarter, Bulandshahar (U.P.) India 

Reserves 

Singh, Baldeo; (M) Director Social Concern; 3349 Christian Colony, 
Karolbagh, New Delhi 5, India 

Lance, Charles; (M) Minister; Central Methodist Church, Meerut, 
U. P. India 

Singh, Dharamjit; (M) Government Service; 28/ A Jain Nagar Mee- 
rut, U. P. India 

Singh, Lamuel Lai; (M) Teacher; Methodist Church, Saharanpur, U. 
P. India 

ALABAMA-WEST FLORIDA (12) SE 

Sec. A, Rows 4-5, Seats 1-6 

*Hildreth, Charles H.; (6) (M) Minister; 103 First St., Ft. Walton 
Beach, Florida 32548 

Duffey, Paul A.; (11) (M) Minister; P. O. Box 6150, Montgomery, 
Alabama 36106 

McDavid, Joel D.; (3) (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 4607, Mobile, Ala- 
bama 36604 

Wilson, Robert L.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 301 Azalea 
Circle, Dothan, Alabama 36301 

Dickerson, Ellis R.; (13) (M) Minister; P. O. Box 223, Shalimar, 
Florida 32579 

Vickers, John E.; (2) (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 111, Opelika, 
Alabama 36801 

28 



The United Methodist Church 29 

Jordan, Roy M.; (4) (M) Engineer; 1502 Indian Hill Rd., Demopolis, 

Alabama 36732 
Cooper, Kenneth; (1) (M) Attorney; Box 1000, Bay Minette, Ala- 
bama 36507 
Creel, John; (8) (M) Car Dealer; DeFuniak Springs, Florida 32433 
Eich, Foster; (10) (M) Merchant; Fort Davis, Alabama 36031 
McDavid, Harry E.; (7) (M) Mail Supervisor; 3414 St. Stephens 

Rd., Mobile, Alabama 36612 
Campbell, Foy; (12) (M) Sales Manager; 3636 Farrar St., Montgom- 
ery, Alabama 36105 

Reserves 

Sublette, Roy, T.; (M) District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 765, Demo- 
polis, Ala. 36732 
Bradley, Cecil E.; (M) Minister; P. O. Box 123, Marianna, Fla. 3244G 
Mixson, Rex M.; (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 1296, Ozark, Ala. 36360 
Garrison, Langdon H.; (M) Minister; 2519 Springhill Ave., Mobile, 

Ala. 36607 
Spencer, Lester H.; (M) Minister; 732 Forest Ave., Montgomery, Ala. 

36106 
Vaughn, Robert L.; (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 5006, Pensacola, Fla. 

32505 
Cleveland, Howard L.; (M) Merchant; Box 266, Centreville, Ala. 

35045 
Barrow, Mrs. Opal; (M) Housewife; 296 Oakdale Ave., Crestview, 

Fla. 32536 
Owen, Hugh; (M) Personnel Director; P. 0. Box 2, Geneva, Alabama 

36340 
Abbott, W. H.; (M) 777 Tanglewood Dr., Pensacola, Fla. 32503 
Orr, John H.; (M) Industralist; Opelika, Alabama 36801 
Lord, H. T.; (M) Banker; Andalusia, Alabama 36420 

ANGOLA (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 13, Seats 11-12 

de Freitas, Antonio Filipe; (11) (M) Minister; Caixa Postal # 9, 

Missao Evangelica Malanju, Angola, Africa 
Fereira Dias, Nobre Pereira; (1) (M) School Director; Missao 

Evangelica, Caixa Postal 68-c, Luanda, Angola, Africa 

Reserves 

da Costa, Matoso Santos; (M) Minister; Missao Evangelica de Luan- 
da, Caixa Postal #68-c, Luanda, Angola, Africa 

Neto, Mateus Joao Sebastiao; (M) Lay Leader; Missao Evangelica, 
Caixa Postal 68-c, Luanda, Angola, Africa 

BALTIMORE (22) NE 

Sec. A, Rows 19-20, Seats 5-12 

Sec. A, Row 21, Seats 7-12 

* Andrews, David H.; (11) (E) District Superintendent; 705 W. 

Patrick St., Frederick, Md. 21701 
Carroll, Edward G.; (2) (M) Minister; 1010 Dale Dr., Silver Spring, 

Md. 20910 
Hall, E. Willia77i; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 10700 Georgia 

Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20906 
Stith, Forrest C; (7) (M) Exec. Sec'y Conf. Bd. of Miss.; 516 N. 

Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 21201 



30 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Williams, Frank L.; (8) (M) Minister; 3801 S. Dakota Ave., N.E., 
Washington D. C. 20018 

Van Brunt, F. Norman; (6) (M) Minister; 5405 N. Charles St., 
Baltimore, Md. 21210 

Rohrbaugh, Laverne E.; (5) (E) Minister; 117 Holly Terrace, 
Hagerstown, Md. 21740 

Yingling, L. Carroll; (3) (M) Minister; 901 Wesley PI., S. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 20024 

Doggett, Herbert L. D.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 8 VanLear 
Dr., Williamsport, Md. 21795 

Jones, John B.; (4) (M) Minister; 1212 Limekiln Rd., Baltimore, 
Md. 21204 

Drennan, Merrill W.; (12) (M) Minister; 3311 Nebraska Ave., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 20016 

Jones, Everett; (1) (M) Mechanical Contractor; Damascus, Mary- 
land 20750 

Dodson, Thurman L.; (2) (M) Attorney; 626 3rd St., N. W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 20001 

Wicklein, Mrs. Helen; (7) (M) Homemaker; Cromwell Bridge Rd., 
Baltimore, Md. 21234 

Beatty, W. Carroll; (12) (M) Attorney; 7000 Forest Hill Dr., Hyatts- 
ville, Md. 20781 

Bristow, Carroll D.; (13) (M) Accountant; 2808 Bauernwood Ave., 
Baltimore, Md. 21234 

Will, Mary K.; (3) (M) Student; 103 Central Ave., Gaithersburg, 
Md. 20760 

Underwood, Harry K.; (4) (M) Attorney; 10302 Ridgemoor Dr., 
Silver Spring, Md. 20901 

Schiller, Theodore E.; (9) (M) Communications; 304 Breslin Rd., 
Joppa, Md. 21085 

Blickenstaff, Thomas C; (10) (E) Real Estate; 121 Coffman Ave., 
Hagerstown, Md. 21740 

Thompson, Mrs. Barbara.; (14) (M) Statistician; 11215 Oakleaf Dr., 
Silver Spring, Md. 20901 

Mann, Charles L.; (8) (M) Retired Corp. Executive; 106 E. Melrose 
Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21212 

Reserves 

Michael, Marion S.; (M) Minister; 1304 Highland Dr., Silver Spring, 

Md. 20910 
Bishop, William E.; (M) District Superintendent; 10700 Georgia 

Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20906 
Firth, William E.; (M) Minister; 131 N. Potomac St., Hagerstown, 

Md. 21740 
Stetler, Roy H., Jr.; (E) Minister; 2700 Cheverly Ave., Cheverly, 

Md. 20785 
Harper, Lyle E.; (M) Minister; 2620 Colson Dr., Chevy Chase, Md. 

20015 , ^, . 

Wallace, Charles L, Sr.; (M) Minister; 1910 Dulany PL, Annapolis, 

Md. 21401 
Doggett, Carroll A.; (M) Minister; 6804 Calverton Dr., Hyattsville, 

Md. 20782 ^ . , 

Foy, James D.; (M) District Superintendent; 10700 Georgia Ave., 

Silver Spring, Md. 20906 ^ ^^.^^ ^ , ^ ,^. 

Kopp, Lamar W.; (E) Minister; 7507 Windsor Mill Rd., Baltimore, 

Md 21207 
Young, Carl E.; (E) Minister; 303 Windsor Mill Rd., Ext., Baltimore, 

Md. 21207 , ,^„„„ ^ 

Bowen Theodore R.; (M) District Superintendent; 10700 Georgia 

Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20906 



The United Methodist Church 31 

Hutchins, Joshua, Jr.; (M) Minister; 1700 Otis St., N. E., Washine- 
ton, D. C. 20018 

Mund, Allen W.; (E) Retired Business Exec; 702 E, Seminary Ave., 
Towson, Md. 21204 

Winter, J. Britian; (E) Attorney; 7022 Bellona Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
21212 

Ross, Mrs. Martha.; (M) Rt. 1, Box 276, Dunkirk, Md. 20754 

Stansbury, William B., Jr.; (M) Attorney; 135 Stevenson Lane, Bal- 
timore, Md. 21212 

Williams, Mrs. Beryl; (M) College Administrator; 4905 The Ale- 
meda, Baltimore, Md. 21239 

Palmer, Mrs. Jane; (M) Labor Representative; 119 St. Lawrence 
Dr., Silver Spring, Md. 20901 

Anderson, Hurst R.; (M) Retired University Pres.; 4616 Albermarle 
St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20016 

Shipley, James W.; (M) Engineer; Harmans, Maryland 21077 

Danley, Samuel B.; (M) Manpower Consultant; 8008 16th St., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20012 

Ewald, Edward L.; (M) Utilities Executive; 734 Fayette St., Cumber- 
land, Md. 21502 

Lutz, Robert W.; (E) Semi-retired Bookkeeper; 4808 Crowson Ave., 
Baltimore, Md. 21212 

Anderson, Mrs. Georgia.; (M) Government Worker; 19 T. Street, 
N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

BENGAL (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 5, Seats 11-12 

Mullick, Pravash R.; (M) (1) Minister; Central Methodist Church, 

131 Dharamtala St., Calcutta 13, India 
Marandi, Emmanuel; (M) (4) Director, Rural Development Project; 

Theodori Mission, Maheshpur Raj, S. P., Bihar, India 

Reserves 

Lai, Mohan; (M) Minister; The Methodist Church, Gomoh, Bihar, 

India 
Marandih, Mrs. Sarala; (M) Pakur, S. P., Bihar, India 

BOMBAY (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 16, Seats 10-11 

Harris, Justin N.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; Robinson Memo- 
rial 13, Sankli St., BycuUa, Bombay 8, India 

Bengers, Vincent; (4) (M) Business Manager; Advani Chambers, Sir 
Phirozshah Mehta Rd., Fort, Bombay 1, India 

Reserves 

Dass, John B.; (M) Minister; Centenary Methodist Church, Grant 

Road, Bombay 7, India 
Ratnam, Darsi J.; (M) Audit Accountant; Esso Eastern Inc., P. 0. 

Box 11041, Bombay 20, BR. India 

CALIFORNIA-NEVADA (14) W 

Sec. B, Rows 5-6, Seats 6-12 
Choy, Wilbur W.; (12) (M) District Superintendent; 1011 Park Hills 

Rd., Berkeley, Ca. 94708 
Thurman, Arthur V.; {2) (M) Conference Program Director; P. 0. 

Box 467, San Francisco, Ca. 94101 



32 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Moore, John V.; (11) (M) Campus Minister; 433 Russell Blvd., 
Davis, Ca. 95616 

Hay ward, C. Douglas; (6) (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 4085, Stockton, 
Ca. 95204 

Bosrvell, Hamilton T.; (7) (M) Minister; 1975 Post St., San Fran- 
cisco, Ca. 94115 , ... T^- , 

Broke, Clifford S.; (9) (M) District Superintendent; 1451 Birchwood 
Lane, Sacramento, Ca. 95822 „ , , „r 

Moon, Robert W.; (1) (M) Minister; 2391 St. Mark's Way, Sacra- 
mento, Ca. 95825 „ ^ „ 

*Webber, Frank; (8) (M) Conference Treasurer; P. 0. Box 467, 
San Francisco, Ca. 94101 ^ ^ „ .^„ o 

Johnson, Richard O.; (3) (M) Student; P. 0. Box 467, San Francisco, 

Catterall, Grace; (13) (M) Housewife; 5310 Callister St., Sacra- 
mento, Ca. 95818 _ . ,,,„ T ^ T^ 

Brawn, Melvin; (5) (E) Electrical Engineer; 1149 Jamestown Dr., 

Sunnyvale, Ca. 94087 „..„., t. r^ 

Carroll, Olivia; (14) (M) Housewife; 3480 W. Alluvial, Fresno, Ca. 

93705 
Booth, Glenn 0.; (10) (M) Mfg. Rep.; 409 Bowen Ave., Modesto, Ca. 

95350 
Walker, J. Everett; (4) (M) Retired; 1073 E. 7th St., Chico, Ca. 

95926 

Reserves 

Crummey, D. Clifford; (M) Church Executive; 83 McAllister St., San 
Francisco, Ca. 94102 . . ■, ^ -.a.c w u ^a 

Wright, Sargent J.; (M) District Superintendent; 1045 W. Harvard 
Ave., Fresno, Ca. 93705 ^ ^ _ , . 

Shaner Harry E.; (M) Executive Director Conference Endowment 
Fund ; 3120 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley, Ca. 94705 

Chinn, Harvey N.; (E) Minister; 3600 J St., Sacramento, Ca. 95816 

Getty; Donald A.; m District Superintendent; 1128 Sycamore Ave., 

WaktLhyT'KTfm Minister; 330 Ellis St., San Francisco, Ca. 

Snyd^er! Sydney; (M) Student; 3112 Mason Way, Modesto, Ca. 95350 

Taylor, Jo; (M) Director of Methodist Actors; 1346 Palomar Circle, 

Sacramento, Ca. 95822 ^„, ^ -, ^ ri„i,i„„^ Pa 

Taylor, George C; (M) Physician; 974 Calmar Ave., Oakland, Ca. 

Machado, Abel P.; (M) Public Accountant; 579 Page Ave., Los Banos, 

Ca. 93635 „ ,^„ .^ „ nrnqc 

Gross, Ben; (M) Student; 375 Hazen St., Milpita^, Ca. 95035 
Winne, DoA W.; (M) State Attorney; 912 W. Telegraph St., Carson 
City, Nevada 89707 

CENTRAL ALABAMA (2) SE 

Sec. C, Rows 16-17, Seat 12 
^Hutchinson, Charles L.; (7) (M) Minister; 1008 5th St. West, Bir- 

mingham, Alabama 35204 ..c v i- „ pj Troof 

Adams, Quenton D.; (4) (M) Businessman; 415 Keeling Rd., E^ast 

Gadsden, Alabama 35903 

Reserves 

None 



The United Methodist Church 33 

CENTRAL CONGO (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 8, Seats 7-8 

Museu, Emile; (M) District Superintendent; E.M.C.C, B.P. 560, 

Luluabourg, R.D.C. 
Ukunda, Andre ; (M) Director of Primary School; E.M.C.C, B.P. 560, 

Luluabourg, R.D.C. 

Reserves 

Ngongo, Daniel-, (M) Conference Treasurer; E.M.C.C, B.P. 560, 

Luluabourg, R.D.C 
Koi, Paul; (M) Nurse; E.M.C.C, B.P. 560, Luluabourg, R.D.C 

CENTRAL ILLIONIS (20) NC 
Sec. D, Rows 5-6, Seats 1-10 

Moore, Eugene J.; (2) (E) District Superintendent; 417 Crestmore 

Ave., E., Mattoon, 111. 61938 
Nestler, Frank H.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; 1121 S. Walnut, 

Springfield, 111. 62704 
Loyd, Harold W.; (6) (M) Minister; 201 W. North St., Decatur, 

111. 62522 
Garrison, R. Benjamin; (11) (M) Minister; 1203 W. Green, Urbana, 

111. 61803 
Hess, Wayne C; (8) (E) Prog. Counselor, Prog. Council; 1211 N. 

Park, Bloomington, 111. 61701 
Thornburg, Robert W.; (3) (M) Minister; 116 N. E. Perry, Peoria, 

111. 61603 
Pitcher, Dale E.; (5) (M) Prog. Director, Prog. Council; 1211 N. 

Park, Bloomington, 111. 61701 
Unger, E. Paul; 6) (M) Minister; 814 Jersey Ave., Normal, 111, 

61761 
North, Jack B.; (14) (M) Minister; 210 W. Church St., Champaign, 

111. 61820 
White, James K.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 1303 N. Clinton 

Blvd., Bloomington, 111. 61701 
*Bertholf, Lloyd M.; (4) (M) Retired University Pres.; 1228 Gettys- 
burg Dr., Bloomington, 111. 61701 
Hanna, Mrs. Ellen; (1) (M) Conf. Pres. WSCS; Little York, Illinois 

61453 
Tombaugh, Reid; (1) Farm Management; 555 W. Grove, Pontiac, 

111. 61764 
Gantz, Richard ; (7) (M) Farmer; Deland, Illinois 61839 
Galbreath, Mrs. Charles; (13) (M) Housewife; 84 First South 

Shores, Decatur, 111. 62526 
Muller, Walter W.; (9) (E) Insurance Agency; 521 W. Westwood 

Dr., Peoria, 111. 61614 
Downie, Dr. Gerald; (10) (M) Physician; 310 S. Schuyler, Kankakee, 

111. 60901 
Reeves, Richard E.; (14) (M) Marketing Executive; 425 Karen Dr., 

Decatur. 111. 62526 
Gurtner, Miss Charlotte; (3) (M) Program Counselor; 1211 N. Park 

St., Bloomington, 111. 61701 
Davis, Paul; (12) (M) TV-News Director; 44 Maple Court, Cham- 
paign, 111. 61820 

Reserves 

Catlin, Dale; (E) Minister; 229 S. Douglas Ave., Springfield, 111. 
62704 



34 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Ekin, Floy J.; (M) District Superintendent; 902 Brown Ave., Gales- 
burg, Illinois 61401 

White, Joseph A.; (E) Minister; 400 W. Union, Bloomington, 111. 
61701 

McCleary, Paul F.; (M) Exec. Sec, Comm. on Structure Study; 3016 
Peachgate Lane, Glenview, 111. 60025 

Mcintosh, Burt A.; (M) Minister; 308 E. Main, Clinton, Illinois 
61727 

Coulter, H. Russell; (M) Exec. Sec, Preachers Aid Society; Rm. 402, 
104 N. Water St., Decatur, Illinois 62522 

Bear, Orval L.; (M) Asso. Exec. Sec, Bd. of Pensions & Preachers' 
Aid; Rm. 402, 104 N. Water St., Decatur, Illinois 62522 

Stolp, Richard L.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 3188, Peoria, 
Illinois 61614 

Canafax, Jackson; (M) Minister; 505 W. 7th, Peoria, Illinois 61605 

Krech, Walter D.; (M) Minister; Rochester, Illinois 62563 

Long, A. Lewis; (E) Retired Farmer; R. F. D. #4, Monmouth, 111. 
61462 

Leighton, Mrs. Woodrow; (E) Store Owner & Manager; 447 Locust, 
Galesburg, 111. 61401 

Bolinger, George; (M) Corporation Owner; 612 N. Broadway, 
Shelbyville, 111. 62565 

Sheldon, Mark; (M) Graduate Student; 204 E. Third, Pana, Il- 
linois 62557 

Rountree, Alvin; (M) Archivist, State Library; 2161 S. 19th, Spring- 
field, 111. 62702 

Fox, Miss Anna; (M) Real Estate Broker; 306 S. Chicago, Rossville, 
111. 60963 

Shuman, Charles W.; (M) Farmer; R. F. D. #1, Sullivan, 111. 61951 

Hansen, John T. ; (deceased) 

Grummon, Richard R.; (M) Lawyer; N. Cotton Hill Rd., Springfield, 
111. 62707 

Lindstrom, David; (M) Retired Professor; 202 W. Pennsylvania, 
Urbana, 111. 61801 

CENTRAL NEW YORK (8) NE 

Sec. A, Rows 15-16, Seats 1-4 

*McCune, Robert J.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 711 Fassett 

Rd., Elmira, N. Y. 14905 
Homer, Robert L.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; 85 Maxwell 

Ave., Geneva, N. Y. 14456 
Swales, William R.; (13) (M) Minister; 148 E. Genesee St., Auburn, 

N. Y. 13021 
Odom, Warren G.; (3) (M) Conf. Program Director; 3049 E. Genesee 

St., Syracuse, N. Y. 13224 
Mann, Robert; (1) (M) Shop Foreman; R. D. 3, Dundee, N. Y. 14537 
Darrow, Frederick M.; (deceased) . 

Curtis, Mrs. Albert; (5) (M) Conf. WSCS president; Box 11, Fair 

Haven, N. Y. 13064 
Totten, Mrs. Howard; (7) (M) Housewife; 204 Washington St., 

Fayetteville, N. Y. 13066 

Reserves 
LeGro, James M.; (M) Minister; 303 S. Main St., Newark, N. Y. 

Knight, John L.; (M) President, Wesley Theological Seminary; 4400 

Mass. Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20016 
Stephenson, Sheldon B.; (M) Minister; 402 N. Aurora St., Ithaca, 

N. Y. 14850 



The United Methodist Church 35 

Love, John L.; (M) Minister; Ten Eyck Ave., Cazenovia, N. Y. 13025 

Betterly, Austin E.; (Deceased 7/5/1971) 

Robinson, Mrs. Stanley C; (M) Vice. Pres. Conf. WSCS; 10 Rose- 
wood Dr., Penn Yan, N. Y. 14527 

McCune, Mrs. Robert J.; (M) Housewife; 711 Fassett Rd., Elmira, 
N. Y. 14905 

Forbes, Robert; (M) Florist; 509 Grace Ave., Newark, N. Y. 14513 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA (20) NE 
Sec. D, Rows 13-14, Seats 1-10 

*Shearer, Daniel L.; (2) (E) District Superintendent; 708 Hilltop 
Dr., New Cumberland, Pa. 17070 

Myers, Paul E.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 2908 Union 
Ave., Altoona, Pa. 16602 

Woods, Willia7n F.; (10) (E) Minister; 600 S. Main St., Red Lion, 
Pa. 17356 

S-pringman, Thomas R.; (1) (E) Minister; 40 Conway, Carlisle, Pa 
17013 

Hopkins, Martin W.; (3) (M) Minister; 27 S. Kershaw St., York, 
Pa. 17402 

Cole, Calvin H.; (13) (E) Minister; 413 Bridge St., New Cumber- 
land, Pa. 17070 

Fetterman, Brian A.; (6) (M) Minister; 136 Stine Dr., Lewistown, 
Pa. 17044 

Howes, John B.; (6) (M) Seminary Professor; 3990 Langley Court 
NW, Washington, D. C. 20015 

Hoopert, Grantas E.\ (14) (M) Minister; 811 Market St., Williams- 
port, Pa. 17701 

Stambach, Arthur W.; (9) (E) Assoc. Director, Program Council- 
212 Allendale Way, Camp Hill, Pa. 17011 

Knupp, Robert E.; (5) (M) Lawyer; 1 Frances Dr., Harrisburg, Pa, 
17113 

Gilmore, Paul G.; (9) (E) Newspaper Editor; 800 First Ave., Wil- 
liamsport, Pa. 17701 

Edgar, Charles E.; (4) (M) Credit Manager; 3808 Bonnyview Rd 
Harrisburg, Pa. 17109 

Warner, Earl D.; (11) (E) Warners Dairy; 175 Linden Ave., Red 
Lion, Pa. 17356 

Ake, Mrs. Frank W.; (3) (M) Homemaker; 346 Market St., Blooms- 
burg, Pa. 17815 

Ritter, Ralph M.; (8) (E) Contractor; 321 N. 28th St., Camp Hill 
Pa. 17011 

Jacobs, Harry H., Jr.; (12) (E) Sheet Metal Worker; 2116 Hillside 
Ave., Williamsport, Pa. 17701 

Hopkins, Mrs. Thomas J.; (7) (M) Housewife; 457 Pine St., Williams- 
port, Pa. 17701 

Plummer, Kenneth H.; (4) (M) Contractor; 930 Leidig Dr., Cham- 
bersburg. Pa. 17201 

Marlow, H. Leroy; (10) (E) Asst. Dir. Contin. Ed.; 1620 S. Allen 
St., State College, Pa. 16801 

Reserves 

Treese, Donald H.; (M) Minister; 2403 Eleventh St., Altoona, Pa. 

16601 
Fritchley, Newton H.; (M) Minister; 112 Mooreland, Carlisle, Pa. 

17013 
Kaufman, Gerald D.; (E) Minister; 420 W. South St., Carlisle, Pa. 

17013 



36 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Stambach, Paul E.; (E) Minister; 131 Center St., Mount Wolf, Pa. 
17347 

Simons, William B.; (M) Minister; 1300 Apple Dr., Mechanicsbur^, 
Pa. 17055 

Wagner, Gerald D.; (M) Minister; 414 W. King St., Shippensburg, 
Pa. 17257 

Kreidler, Clair C; (E) District Superintendent; 2836 Eastwood Dr., 
York, Pa. 17402 

Shover, Donald R., Jr.; (E) Minister; 48 W. Main St., Lock Haven, 
Pa. 17745 

Higgins, D. Rayborn; (E) District Superintendent; 48 Wain St., 
Wellsboro, Pa. 16901 

Law, James G.; (M) Carpet Manufacturer; 424 Market St., Blooms- 
burg, Pa. 17815 

Worthington, Mrs. Harley R.; (M) Retired School Teacher; 714 
Elmira St., Williamsport, Pa. 17701 

Meredith, Victor K., Sr.; (M) Retired; 346 Queen St., Northumber- 
land, Pa. 17857 

Myers, C. Ray; (E) Funeral Director; 501 Sixth St., Altoona, Pa. 
16602 

Page, Conrad M., Jr.; (E) Government Employee; R.F.D. #1, Etters, 
Pa. 17319 

Boyer, Samuel C; (E) Retail Jeweler; 41 Wilson St., Carlisle, Pa. 
17013 

Zimmerman, Richard P.; (E) R.F.D. #8, Chambersburg, Pa. 17201 

Harpster, Dorothy; (M) College Professor; 259 Walnut St., Shippens- 
burg, Pa. 17257 

Girton, Paul K.; (M) Manufacturer; Millville, Pa. 17846 

CENTRAL TEXAS (12) SC 

Sec. A, Rows 22-23, Seats 7-12 

Greenwaldt, William M.; (6) (M) Minister; Box 773, Temple, Texas 
76501 

Pumell, Eric C; (7) (M) Minister; 522 Missouri, Fort Worth, Tx. 
76104 

Dennis, Gordon; (3) (M) District Superintendent; Box 6296, Brown- 
wood, Texas 76801 

Howell, Maggart B.; (5) (M) Minister; 4200 Camp Bowie, Fort 
Worth, Tx. 76107 

Roberts, Sidney; (11) (M) Area Program Director; Box 8124, Dallas, 
Texas 75205 

Loyd, H. Brown; (8) (M) District Superintendent; Box 7740, Waco, 
Texas 76710 

*Grogan, Roy J.; (2) (M) Attorney; M. & F. Bank Bldg., Weather- 
ford, Texas 76086 

Walker, Morris D.; (4) (M) Business Executive; 5311 Timberwilde, 
Fort Worth, Texas 76112 

Bane, Mrs. W. V.; (9) (M) Pres., Conf. WSCS; Box 171, Cleburne, 
Texas 76031 

Wilson, Carroll; (13) (M) Pharmacist; 805 W. Oak, Olney, Texas 
76374 

Wonders, Dr. Alice; (14) (M) College Professor; 4512 Meadow- 
brook, Fort Worth, Tex. 76103 

Mahon, Eldon B.; (1) (M) Attorney; 4167 Sarita Dr., Fort Worth, 
Tex. 76109 

Reserves 

Gallaway,Ira; (M) District Superintendent; 5105 Ederville Rd., Fori 
Worth, Tx. 76112 



The United Methodist Church 37 

Meier, H. F., Jr.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 156, Waxahachie, 

Tx., 75165 
Bane, W. V.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 171, Cleburne, Texas 

76031 
Shuler, James E.; (M) Minister; 2201 E. Park Row, Arlington, Tx. 

76010 
Williams, L. Stanley; (M) District Superintendent; 800 W. Fifth, 

Fort Worth, Texas 76102 
Carroll, B. F.; (M) Business Executive; 3821 Wharton, Fort Worth, 

Tx. 76133 
Steward, Jack, Jr.; (M) Contractor; Box 178, Waco, Texas 76703 
Childress, Robert T., Jr.; (M) Consulting Engineer; 811 Colonial, 

Cleburne, Tx. 76031 
Kreitner, Mrs. H. L.; (M) Housewife; 409 Sunset Dr., Euless, Tx. 

76039 
Jud, Eugene F.; (M) GEO Administrator; 110 S. 12th, Waco, Texas 

76701 

COSTA RICA (2) OS 

Sec. D, Rows 15-16, Seat 12 

Palomo, Luis Fernando; (M) District Superintendent; Apartado 858, 

San Jose, Costa Rica 
Vargas, Roberto K.; (M) Accountant; Apartado 292, Alajuela, Costa 

Rica 

Reserves 

Guevera, Alexis; (M) Minister; Apartado 9, Guadalupe, San Jose, 

Costa Rica 
Bermudez, Efrain; (M) Office worker; Iglesia Methodista, Villa 

Neily, Costa Rica 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 3, Seats 11-12 

*Schneeberger, Vilem; (1) (M) Superintendent; Praha 2, Jecna 19, 

Czechoslovakia 
Malac, Vlastislav; (13) (M) Research-worker; Praha 3, Klucinam 5, 

Czechoslovakia 

Reserves 

Havek, Vaclav; (M) Minister; Mikulov Namor, Videnska 17, Czecho- 
slovakia 

Buresova, Mrs. Marta; (M) Retired lay preacher; Praha 1, Karoliny 
Svetle 18, Czechoslovakia • 

DELHI (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 15, Seats 10-11 

Lai, James; (11) (M) Minister; Christ Church, 1 Butler Rd., Delhi 6, 

India 
Newton, C. D. S.; (13) (M) Railway Service; B-13/66 Dev Nagar, 

Karol Bagh, New Delhi 5, India 

Reserves 

Dean, Benjamin F.; (M) District Superintendent; P. G. Box #28, 

Methodist Church, Batala, Punjab, India 
Townsley, Mrs. E. B.; (M) District Work; 4 Battery Lane, Delhi 6, 

India 



38 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

DENMARK (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 3, Seats 11-12 

*Carlsen, Eigil; (11) (M) District Superintendent; Bethesdagade, 

4400 Kalundborg, Denmark 
Johansen, Frede; (4) (M) Surgeon; Mollevej, Kvissel, 9900 Frederik- 

shavn, Denmark 

Reserves 

Brandt, Frede; (M) District Superintendent; Vissingsgade, 7700 

Vejie, Denmark 
Bjerno, Henning; (M) Press Officer; Birketoften 7, 2890 Hareskov, 

Denmark 
Ramsing, Niels J.; (M) Manager; Faedresmindevej 19, 5000 Odense, 

Denmark 

DETROIT (18) NC 
Sec. D, Rows 21-22-23, Seats 1-6 

DeWitt, Jesse R.; (2) (M) Nat'l Div. Bd. of Missions; 475 Riverside 
Dr., New York, N. Y. 10027 

Bristah, James W.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 8th Floor 
Francis Palms BIdg., 2111 Woodward, Detroit, Mi. 48201 

Cochran, James D.; (4) (M) District Superintendent; 8th Floor 
Francis Palms Bldg., 2111 Woodward, Detroit, Mi. 48201 

Lamh, Raymond R.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 367, 
Marquette, Mi. 49855 

Marvin, John E.; (11) (M) Editor, Michigan Christian Advocate; 316 
Springbrook, Adrian, Mi 49221 

Horton, Robert E.; (13) (E) Minister; 8506 Clinton River Dr., Ster- 
ling Heights, Mi. 48087 

Duncan, Edward L.; (5) (M) Minister; 206 E. Flint, Lake Orion, 
Mi. 48035 

Grenfell, John N., Jr.; (12) (M) Minister; 820 Lapeer St., Port 
Huron, Mi. 48060 

White, Woodie W.; (10) (M) Exec. Sec, Comm. on Rel. & Race; 
100 Maryland Ave., N. E., Washington, D. C. 20002 

*Ammerman, Carl R.; (2) (M) Township Supervisor; 1315 E. Mt. 
Morris Rd., Mt. Morris, Michigan 48458 

Norris, Irene; (7) (M) Pres. Conf. WSCS; 2024 Earlmont Rd., Berk- 
ley, Mich. 48072 

Karls, Harold M.; (1) (M) Banker; 20 Hammond Rd., Saginaw, 
Mich. 48602 

Spafford, Freda; (6) (E) Housewife; 22186 Nona, Dearborn, Michi- 
gan 48124 

Good, Mary; (8) (M) Research Chemist; 3128 Ewald, Detroit, Mich. 
48238 

Ragland, James; (3) (M) Camp Director; 8794 Lakeshore Dr., Rt. 1, 
Jeddo, Mich. 48032 

Hitchock, William C; (4) (M) Real Estate; 22200 John R., Hazel 
Park, Mich. 48030 

Bright, William E.; (14) (M) City Councilman; 306 LaBelle, High- 
land Park, Mich. 48203 

Thompson, Lionel; (9) (M) Businessman; 2961 McGill St., Marietta, 
Mich. 48453 

Reserves 

Kellerman, Garfield H., Jr.; (E) District Superintendent; 1717 Mont- 

clair, Flint, Mich. 48503 
Mulder, John W.; (M) Area Admin. Asst.; 8th Floor Francis Palms 

Bldg., 2111 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48201 



The United Methodist Church 39 

Smith, Norbert W.; (M) Minister; 4790 Gratiot, Saginaw, Mich. 

48603 
Vosburg, Frederick C; (M) Minister; 22124 Garrison, Dearborn, 

Mich. 49124 
Ward, Robert P.; (M) Minister; 225 W. Court St., Flint, Mich. 48503 
McCallum, Marvin H.; (M) Minister; 33 E. Burdick, Oxford, Mich. 

48051 
Jury, John S.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 34, Ann Arbor, 

Mich. 48107 
Smoot, Jewell M.; (M) Conference Treasurer; 8th Floor Francis 

Palms Bldg., 2111 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48201 
Parrish, John W.; (M) Minister; 16801 Schoolcraft, Detroit, Mich. 

48227 
Robinson, William T.; (M) Urban Missioner; 8th Floor Francis 

Palms Bldg., 2111 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 48201 
Lindberg, Kenneth D.; (M) Supt. of Schools; 548 Duncan St., Ishpe- 

ming, Mich. 49849 
Coffin, Allen; (M) Real Estate; 30214 Underwood, Warren, Mich. 

48092 
Haist, Willard P.; (E) Dentist; 120 James St., Pigeon, Mich. 48775 
Rae, Daisy; (M) Housewife; 2326 Raskob, Flint, Mich. 48504 
Chairer, Jane; (M) Housewife; 50 N. Parker, Dexter, Mich. 48130 
Love, Grace; (M) Housewife; 2960 Cedar Lake Rd., Howell, Mich. 

48843 
Ward, Irma H.; (M) Housewife; 170 E. Main, Milan, Mich. 48160 
Crippen, James A.; (M) Attorney; 911 Robbin Rd., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

48103 
Middleton, Wayne B.; (E) Bell Telephone Supervisor; 7612 Amboy 

Rd., Dearborn Heights, Michigan 48127 
Griffith, Evelyn; (M) Housewife; 1201 S. Renaud, Grosse Pointe 

Woods, Michigan 48236 

EAST CHINA (2) OS 

No delegates elected 

EAST OHIO (26) NC 

Sec. B, Rows 9-10, Seats 1-12 
Sec. B, Row 8, Seats 11-12 

Kelley, Robert W.; (6) (M) Minister; 1117 E. 105th St., Cleveland, 

Ohio 44108 
Tolbert, Robert J.; (6) (M) Minister; 525 Wooster Ave., Akron, Ohio 

44307 
Hulit, Kenneth W.; (2) (E) Director Program Council; 1300 S. Main 

St., North Canton, Ohio 44720 
Cromwell, Thomas L.; (13) (M) Minister; 243 N. Market St., 

Wooster, Ohio 44691 
*Brandyberry, Abraham L.; (13) (E) Minister; 2521 12th St., N. W., 

Canton, Ohio 44708 
Courtney, Robert H.; (5) (M) Assoc, Program Council; 1300 S. Main 

St., North Canton, Ohio 44720 
Nees, Forrest G.; (11) (M) District Superintendent; 30 West Front 

St., Youngstown, Ohio 44503 
Nelson, J. R.; (3) (M) Seminary Professor; 745 Commonwealth Ave., 

Boston, Mass. 02215 
Dailey, Charles M.; (3) (M) Minister; 702 Main St., Wintersville, 

Ohio 43952 
Wagner, Blake D.; (5) (E) Minister; 771 E. 260th St., Euclid, Ohio 

44132 



40 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Myers, Calvin R.; (14) (M) Minister; Seminary at Spring Sts., 
Berea, Ohio 44017 

Eberly, Edwin P.; (8) (E) District Superintendent; 345 Market 
St., N., Rm. 202, Wooster, Ohio 44691 

Mayer, Paul O.; (7) (M) Assoc. Program Council; 8276 Lindberg 
Blvd., Berea, Ohio 44017 

Cooke, Mrs. Monroe; (1) (M) Housewife; 13060 Forest Rd., R. D. #2, 
Burton, Ohio 44021 

Moore, Thomas P.; (4) (E) Gen'l Mgr. Broadcasting; Box 789, 
Bucyrus, Ohio 44820 

Chittum, John; (9) (M) College Professor; 722 N. Bever St., Woo- 
ster, Ohio 44691 

Glasgow, Francis M.; (4) (M) 3755 Martha Rd., Kent, Ohio 44240 

Hayes, Melvin; (10) (E) Conference Statistician; 662 Shook Rd., 
Akron, Ohio 44319 

Lang, Francis; (7) (M) Lawyer-Banker; Box 103, Highland Colony, 
E. Liverpool, Ohio 43920 

O'Hara, Delmar T.; (12) (M) Lawyer; 125 Third St., Wellsville, 
Ohio 43968 

Achberger, Mrs. Clarence E.; (11) (M) Housewife; 900 E. Chestnut 
St., Ext., Mt. Vernon, Ohio 43050 

Robinson, Albert; (1) (M) Steel Worker; 861 Fairfax St., Youngs- 
town, Ohio 44505 

Bonds, Alfred B.; (2) (M) College President; Baldwin-Wallace Col- 
lege, Berea, Ohio 44017 

White, Leonard; (9) (M) Dir. Educational Service Center; 428 Ellen 
Ave., S. W., New Philadelphia, Ohio 44663 

Clymer, Merritt; (8) (E) Life Insurance Mgr.; 508 Glenwood Ave., 
North Canton, Ohio 44220 

Boyer, Gene; (10) (E) Store Owner; 304 N. Turner Rd., Youngstown, 
Ohio 44515 

Reserves 

Kirk, Arthur R.; (M) Minister; 53 Clyde Ave., New London, Ohio 

44851 
Brown, Gladstone L.; (M) District Superintendent; 705 Hanna Bldg., 

Cleveland, Ohio 44115 
Zagray, Allan H.; (E) Minister; 6535 Manchester Rd., Akron, Ohio 

44319 
Hamilton, Charles W.; (M) Minister; 312 Third St., Elyria, Ohio 

44035 
Mayer, Theodore C; (M) District Superintendent; 164 S. Union St., 

Akron, Ohio 44301 
Ralph, Janis S.; (M) Minister; 347 W. Miller Ave., Akron, Ohio 

44301 
Burge, Donald; (M) District Superintendent; 217 N. Broadway, Box 

427, Barnesville, Ohio 43713 
Hogg, William K.; (M) Minister; 65 Public Square, Brecksville, Ohio 

44141 
Gray, Ralph M.; (M) Minister; Caledonia & Winsford Rds., Cleve- 
land, Ohio 44112 
Corl, Daniel D.; (E) District Superintendent; 378 Park Ave., W., 

Mansfield, Ohio 44906 
Wiant, Howard J.; (M) Minister; 120 Cleveland Ave., S. W., Canton, 

Ohio 44702 
Hahn, Robert J.; (E) Minister; 784 Coburn St., Akron, Ohio 44311 
Walton, Donald W.; (M) Minister; 705 Hanna Bldg., Cleveland, Ohio 

44115 
Drake, M. R.; (M) Minister; 19414 Detroit Rd., Rocky River, Ohio 

44116 



The United Methodist Church 41 

Maibach, Paul; (E) Sterling, Ohio 44276 

Taylor, Jack; (M) Home Administrator; 807 West Avenue, Elvria. 

Ohio 44035 
Dammann, Mrs. Chester; (M) Housewife; 182 Renwick Dr., Poland, 

Ohio 44514 
Mitchell, Mrs. B. V.; (M) Housewife; 1585 S. Main St., Clyde, Ohio 

43410 
Clary, Mrs. Irvin; (E) Housewife; Route #2, Bucyrus, Ohio 44820 
Lanier, Anna E.; (M) Housewife; 2220 27th St., Cuyahoga Falls, 

Ohio 44223 
Dunlap, Mrs. William F.; (M) Housewife; 129 Forest View Dr., 

Wintersville, Ohio 43953 
Archer, John; (M) Retired; 3853 Lincoln, Shadyside, Ohio 43947 
Knight, David; (M) College Professor; Ashland College, Ashland, 

Ohio 44805 
Williams John R.; (M) Lawyer; 1257 French, Lakewood, Ohio 44107 
Hanlin, William; (E) Automobile Dealer; East Springfield, Ohio 

43925 
Collins, Christopher J.; (M) Mgr. Printing Plant; 3715 Cypress Ave., 

Cleveland, Ohio 44107 
Graber, Robert L.; (M) President, Graber Mills, Inc.; 2914 Acacia 

Dr., N. W., Canton, Ohio 44718 
Forni, Roy; (M) Retired; 508 S. Third St., Martins Ferry, Ohio 

44393 

EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA (16) NE 
Sec. B, Rows 20-21, Seats 1-8 

Hostetter, Mark J.; (2) (E) District Superintendent; 1992 Park 

Plaza, Lancaster, Pa. 17601 
Walley, F. Lewis; (6) (M) Conference Program Director; 1956 

Adams Ave., Abington, Pa. 19001 
Ellis, Edwin L.; (1) (M) Minister; 252 Congress Ave., Lansdowne, 

Pa. 19050 
Zehner, Henry W.; (10) (E) District Superintendent; 9650 Pine Rd., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19115 
Bashore, George W.; (5) (E) Minister; 2305 Laurel Rd. Whitefield, 

Reading, Pa. 19609 
Nichols, Henry H.; (9) (M) Minister; 328 W, Earlham Terrace, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 
Mentzer, Warren F.; (11) (E) District Superintendent; Lancaster 

Ave., Mt. Gretna, Pa. 17064 
Buttimer, Thomas A.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 607 Runny- 

mede Ave., Jenkintown, Pa. 19046 
Daugherty, Ruth M.; (13) (E) Housewife; 803 S. 12th St., Lebanon, 

Pa. 17042 
Dodge, Carlton S.; (3) (E) College Alumni Director; 817 Floret, 

Riverview Park, Reading, Pa. 19605 
Shroyer, Lawton W.; (4) (E) Dress Manufacturer; 515 Dewart St., 

Shamokin, Pa. 17872 
*Harper, John R.; (14) (M) V. P. The Pardee Co.; 7508 Brookfield 

Rd., Philadelphia, Pa. 19126 
Quickel, Harold H.; (8) (E) Purchasing Agent, Hamilton Watch 

Co. ; 128 Atkins Avenue, Lancaster, Pa. 17603 
Jason, William C. Jr.; (12) (M) Retired; 614 N. 56th St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 19131 
Barto, Reta S.; (7) (M) Housewife; 123 W. 46th St., Reading, Pa, 

19606 
Lightner, A. LeRoy; (2) (M) V. P. Advertising Agency; 411 N. 

Church St., West Chester, Pa. 19380 



42 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Reserves 

Longenecker, Robert P.; (E) Minister; 50 College Ave., Annville, Pa. 
17003 

Flood, Harold D.; (M) Minister; 335 Price St., West Chester, Pa. 
19380 

Cherry, William T.; (M) Minister; 497 Darby-Paoli Rd., Paoli, Pa. 
19301 

Corbett, James D.; (E) Minister; 106 E. Sunbury St., Shamokin, Pa. 
17872 

Kulp, John C; (M) District Superintendent; 12 Farwood Rd., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19151 

Daugherty, Robert M.; (E) Minister; 803 S. 12th St., Lebanon, Pa. 
17042 

Hippel, George N.; (M) Dir. of Miss. & Church Ext.; 209 Rodney Cir- 
cle, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 19010 

Loesch, Warren A.; (E) Dir. Advance Specials Gen. Bd. of Missions; 
37 Brunswick Rd., Montclair, New Jersey 07042 

Kerr, Charles S.; (M) Minister; 1285 Hillside Dr., Lancaster, Pa. 
17603 

Ranch, Ezra H.; (E) Coordinator of Adult Ministries; 6142 Wayne 
Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 19144 

Luff, William G.; (M) Conference Treasurer; 1701 Arch St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 19103 

Knisely, Roger M.; (E) C. P. A.; 204 Elm St., Annville, Pa. 17003 

Hostetter, Russell R.; (E) Painting Contractor; 2400 Mifflin St., 
Lebanon, Pa. 17042 

Weaver, Dorothy S.; (E) Housewife; 529 5th Ave., Denver, Pa. 
17517 

Johnson, Elizabeth A.; (M) Housewife; 120 Lafayette Ave., Oreland, 
Pa. 19075 

Herr, Helen C; (M) Housewife; 210 Martroy Lane, Wallingford, 
Pa. 19084 

Quickel, Olive; (E) Housewife; 128 Atkins Ave., Lancaster, Pa. 17603 

Heck, J. Holland; (M) Retired; Cornwall Manor, Cornwall, Pa. 17016 

Hoffer, Paul F.; (E) Merchant; 138 E. Frederick St., Millersville, Pa. 
17551 

Hudson, Mary A.; (M) Housewife; 54 N. 54th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
19139 

FLORIDA (26) SE 

Sec. A, Rows 9-10, Seats 1-12 

Sec. A, Row 8, Seats 11-12 

*Foster, George A.; (14) (M) Minister; Box 1086, Tallahassee, Flori- 
da 32302 

Blackburn, Robert M.; (2) (M) Minister; 42 E. Jackson St., Orlando, 
Fl. 32801 

Zimmerman, Eugene M.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; Box 
8745, Orlando, Fl. 32806 

Huston, Ralph B.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; Box 2625, Lake- 
land, Fl. 33803 

Williams, John BF ; Deceased 9-8-71 

Hedberg, Al A.; (7) (M) Minister; Box 1138, St. Petersburg, Fl. 
33731 

Cleveland, Millard C; (10) (M) Minister; 100 SE Second Ave., Ft. 
Lauderdale, Fl. 33301 ^^ _.,. ^ ., „ , 

Obaugh, William R.; (4) (E) Minister; 9625 N. Military Trail, Palm 
Beach Gardens, Fl. 33403 ^ ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^. . ^, 

Knox, James L.; (1) (M) Minister; 1800 SW 15th St., Miami, Fl. 
33145 



The United Methodist Church 43 

Rooks, John J.; (8) (M) Minister; Box 819, Winter Park, Fl. 32789 

Bozeman, W. Scott; (3) (M) Minister; 411 W. Turner St., Clear- 
water, Fl. 33516 

Rtitland, Walter B.; (9) (M) District Superintendent; Box 815, De- 
land, Fl. 32720 

Kalaf, Walter N.; (11) (M) Minister; 3723 Bay to Bay, Tampa, Fl. 
33609 

Meadows, William A.; (5) (M) Attorney; Box 516, Kendall, Fl. 33516 

Moore, Richard V.; (3) (M) College President; Bethune Cookman 
College, Daytona Beach, Florida 32015 

Revels, Percy B.; (1) (M) Circuit Judge; Drawer 250, Palatka, Fl. 
32077 

Watson, Mrs. Olive E.; (4) (M) Pres., Conf. WSCS; Box 96, Wild- 
wood, Fl. 32785 

Fanning, O.B.; (9) (M) Conf. Pub. Rel.; 1015 S. Miss Ave., Lakeland, 
Fl. 33803 

Gray, Mrs. Ethel M.; (7) (M) Farmer; Box 36, Hastings, Florida 
32045 

Babcock, Charles I.; (11) (M) Gen. Contractor; 1020 Alfonso Ave., 
Coral Gables, Florida 33145 

Mann, Robert T.; (12) (M) Judge, Dist. Ct. of Appeal; Box 327, 
Lakeland, Florida 33802 

Redstone, Ray L.; (2) (M) Asst. Postmaster; 2148 33rd Ave., Vero 
Beach, Fl. 32960 

Hughlett, William S.; (10) (M) Retired Medical Miss'y; 809 Indian 
River Dr., Cocoa, Florida 32922 

Blackburn, Alfred B.; (13) (M) Attorney; 912 Am. Heritage Life 
Bldg., Jacksonville, Fl. 32202 

Weems, Mrs. H. V.; (6) (M) Homemaker; 160 S. Lakeview Dr., 
Sebring, Fl. 33870 

Gentry, Edd W.; (8) (M) Executive; 2205 Mulberry Blvd., Tallahas- 
see, Florida 32302 

Reserves 

McDonell, C. Durward; (5) (M) Minister; 127 NE 4th St., Miami, 
Fl. 33132 

Roughton, William W.; (M) District Superintendent; 2226 NW 2nd 
Ave., Gainesville, Fl. 32601 

Hamilton, Charles P.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 38, Saraso- 
ta, Fl. 33578 

Buell, Harold E.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 2097, Miami 
Beach, Fl. 33140 

Head, Lewis N.\ (M) District Superintendent; 2935 Washington Rd., 
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405 

Alle^J, Raymond A.; (M) Minister; 3803 Haines Rd., N., St. Peters- 
burg, Florida 33703 

Howe, GaijlonL.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 7307, St. Peters- 
burg, Fl. 33734 

Mackay, Donald M.; (M) Minister; 5400 Seminole Blvd., Seminole, Fl. 
33540 

West, C. Eugene; (M) Minister; 1400 University Blvd., N., Jackson- 
ville, Fl. 32211 

Ware, H. Melton; (M) AC Program Director; Box 70, Lakeland, 
Fl. 33802 

Steger, Clarence D.; (M) Minister; Box 10249, St. Petersburg, Fl. 
33733 

Gibbs, Marion M.; (M) District Superintentent; 225 E. Duval St., 
Jacksonville, Fl. 32202 

Gallotvay, Henry G.; (M) Minister; 7600 SW 104th St., Miami, Fl. 
33156 



44 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Boggs, Robert C; (M) District Superintendent; 2502 Morrison Ave., 

Tampa, Fl. 33609 
Bledsoe, Robert D.; (M) Minister; 1126 E. Silver Spgs. Blvd., Ocala, 

Fl. 32670 
Burney, Harry L., Jr.; (M) Administrative Asst. ; Bethune Cookman 

College, Daytona Beach, Florida 32015 
Jones, James I.; (M) Executive Vice Pres.; 90 NW 107 St., Miami 

Shores, Fl. 33168 
Sargeant, John B.; (M) Dairyman; Box 17, Lakeland, Fl. 33802 
Goodwin, Miss Edith M.; (M) Director of Christian Ed.; 7600 SW 

104 St., Miami, Fl. 33156 
Tisdale, Mrs. Inez S.; (M) Retired Accountant; 501 N. Ocean St., 

Apt. 1501, Jacksonville, Florida 32202 
Crist, Mrs. Dollie L. ; (M) Homemaker; 450 Seabreeze Dr., Indialan- 

tic, Fl. 32903 
Pinesett, Patricia S.; (M) Conf. Vice. Pres. WSCS; 3239 Mahalia PI., 

Lake Mann Est., Orlando, Fl. 32805 
Pearce, Richard W.; (M) College Vice President; 130 Lake Hollings- 

worth Dr., Lakeland, Florida 33803 
Johnson, Cubell A.; (M) Homemaker; Box 5064, Orlando, Fl. 32805 
Grant, John A., Jr.; (E) Attorney; 10025 Orange Grove Dr., Tampa, 

Fl. 33618 
Morris, John E.; (M) Attorney; 301 E. Las Olas Blvd., Ft. Lauder- 
dale, Florida 33301 
Gold, Glenn W.; (M) Retired; 1525 SW 12th St., Miami, Fl. 33135 
Kelso, Earl F,; (M) Retired Oil Corp.; 2714 Valencia Dr., Sarasota, 

Fl. 33579 
Banks, Mrs. Henrine W.; (M) College Dean; 125 N. Keech, Daytona 

Beach, Fl. 32015 
Wilcox, Mrs. Barbara B.; (M) Dental Assistant; 3355 Bowers Lane, 

Jacksonville, Florida 32217 

FOOCHOW (2) OS 

No delegates elected 

GEORGIA (2) SE 

Sec. D, Rows 3-4, Seat 1 

*Epj}s, Anderson C; (6) (M) Minister; 108 Burbank Dr., S. W., 

Atlanta, Georgia 30314 
Wilson, T. R.; (4) (M) Carpenter; 5400 Cascade Rd., S. W., Atlanta, 
Georgia 30310 

Reserves 

Henderson, Cornelius L.; (M) Bd. of Evangelism Staff; 1908 Grand 

Ave., Nashville, Tenn. 37212 ... -o ^ -o • * 

Jackson, James L; (M) Civil Service; 1229 Calhoun St., East Pomt, 

Ga. 30344 

ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF GERMAN DEMOCRATIC 
REPUBLIC (4) OS 

Sec. B, Row 22, Seats 1-4 
*Havemann, Gerhard; (13) (E) District Superintendent; DDR 1034 

Berlin, Gubenerstr. 23, Germany . . j . T^T^T> a^ a « 

Gotz, Herbert; (6) (M) District Superintendent; DDR 94 Ave, 

Sc'hneebergerstr. 85, Germany ^^ r. . ■> ^ t a u ,, 

Enke, Karl-Heinz; (5) (E) Doctor; DDR 25 Postock 1, In der Hasen- 

bak 2 DDR, Germany 



The United Methodist Church 45 

Schneidereit, Harry; (1) (M) DDR 110 Berlin, Breitestrasse 24 
DDR, Germany 

Reserves 

Langer, Horst; (E) Minister; DDR 89 Gorlitz, Herbert Balyer— Str. 

7, Germany 
Riedel, Gerhard; (M) Minister; DDR 75 Cottbus, Verchow— Str. 41, 

Germany 
Schlechte, Erhard; (E) Professor; DDR 703 Leipzig, An der Tabaks- 

miihle 50, Germany 
Schroder, Harry; (M) DDR 927 Hohenstein-Ernstthal, Lutherstrasse 

6, Germany 

GUJARAT (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 17, Seats 11-12 

Chawhan, Jayanand I.; (M) Secretary, Bible Society; Canaan, Near 
Khadayata Colony, Ellis Bridge, Ahmedabad-6 India 

Chitnis, Vinubhai W. ; (M) Building Contractor; Chitnis Bhuvan, 
Mission Road, Nadiad, Kaira Dist., India 

Reserves 

Master, Ithiel V.; (M) Director, Lay Training Centre; Methodist 

Church, Vasad, Kaira Dist., India 
Rathod, Raijibhai M.; (M) District Superintendent; Methodist 

Church, Maninagar, Ahmedabad-8, India 
Singh, Joseph B.; (M) District Superintendent; Fateh Ganj, Baroda- 

2, India 
Bauman, David B.; (M) District Superintendent; Methodist Mission, 

Godhra, Ranch Mahals, India 
Christian, Samson T.; (M) Executive; Fateh Ganj, Baroda-2, India 
Parmar, Rameshchandra E.; (M) Advocate; Mayur Kunj, Godhra, 

Ranch Mahals, India 
Chavirhan, Samuel K.; (M) Office Superintendent; Fellowship Society, 

Rakhial Road, Ahmedabad-21, India 

HINGHWA (2) OS 

No delegates elected 

HOLSTON (18) SE 
Sec. D, Rows 17-18, Seats 1-9 

* Stokes, Mack B.; (6) (M) Dean, Candler; Emory University, Cand- 
ler School of Theology, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 

White, Raymon E.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; Box 1064, 
Johnson City, Tenn. 37601 

Wilcox, Robert L; (1) (M) Minister; Box 1303, Knoxville, Tenn. 
37901 

Eldridge, Edgar A.; (3) (M) Minister; Box 511, Bristol, Va. 24201 

Lundy, Robert F.; (11) (M) Exec. Sec. S. E. Jurisdiction; 159 For- 
rest Ave., N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30303 

Robbins, Wilmer B.; (8) (M) Minister; First United Methodist 
Church, Marion, Virginia 24354 

Naff, George E.; (7) (M) District Superintendent; 1752 Old Niles 
Ferry Rd., Maryville, Tenn. 37801 

McCartt, James S.; (5) (M) Minister; Box 473, Maryville, Tenn. 
37801 

Settle, Frank A.; (14) (M) Exec. Sec. Program Council; Box 1178, 
Johnson City, Tenn. 37601 

Steffner, John E., Sr.; (4) (M) Corporation Officer; 4301 Evergreen 
Dr., Chattanooga, Tenn. 37411 



46 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Ragsdale, Mrs. J. B.; (13) (M) Homemaker; 605 Talley Rd., Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn. 37411 

Smith, Holiday; (2) (M) Dept. Supt. Tenn. Eastman; 1105 Watauga 
St., Kingsport, Tenn. 37660 

Lundy, John T.; (7) (M) Assoc. Sec. Conf. Prog. Council; P. 0. 
Box 1178, Johnson City, Tenn. 37601 

Wilson, Frank S.; (1) (M) Judge; 103 Stratford Lane, Signal Mtn., 
Tenn. 37377 

Prigmore, L. T.; (5) (M) Textile Mfg.; Hill Drive, Lupton City, 
Tenn. 37351 

Lusby, L. D.; (9) (E) Supervisor, E. Tenn. Pack.; Rt. 6, Perry Rd., 
Knoxville, Tenn. 37914 

Long, Carroll H.; (10) (M) Surgeon; 107 W. Fairview Ave., John- 
son City, Tenn. 37601 

Entler, Fred P.; (12) (M) Alumni Director, E & H College; Emory 
& Henry College, Emory, Va. 24327 

Reserves 

Smith, J. Castro; (E) District Superintendent; Box 1592, Morristown, 
Tenn. 37813 

Timberlake, Richard H.; (M) Minister; 617 Gilbert St., Alcoa, Tenn. 
37701 

Steele, William S.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 548, Wytheville, 
Va. 24382 

Varnell, Sam N.; (M) Minister; 3316 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, Tenn. 
37919 

St. Clair, Ben B.; (M) Minister; Box 567, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 

Chilcote, Thomas F.; (M) Minister; Box 1346, Kingsport, Tenn. 37662 

Jones, Major J.; (M) President, Gammon Theological Seminary; 653 
Beckwith St., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 30314 

Goodgame, Gordon C; (M) Minister; Box 1025, Kingston, Tenn. 37763 

Hankins, James E.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 82, Cleveland, 
Tenn. 37311 

Ripley, John E; (M) Minister; 5613 Oak Ridge Hwy., Knoxville, 
Tenn. 37921 

Hutchins, Charles A.; (M) Director, Social Service; Box 188, Green- 
ville, Tenn. 37743 

Armentrout, Olin; (M) RFD Carrier; Mill Park Farm, Max Mead- 
ows, Va. 24360 

Franks, James S.; (M) Manager, Electric Co.; Newport Utilities, 
Newport, Tenn. 37821 

Troy, Mrs. Olin H.; (M) Homemaker; 4411 Drummond Dr., Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. 37411 

Russell, Mrs. H. M.; (M) Homemaker; Box 388, Loudon, Tenn. 37774 

Yeatts, Earnest; (M) Game Warden Supt.; Meadowview, Virginia 
24361 

Neely, Sam H., Jr.; (M) Laundry Owner; Spruce St., Norton, Va. 
24273 

Oliphant, George W.; (M) Engineer, Union Carbide; 106 Wendover 
Circle, Oak Ridge, Tenn. 37830 

Lay, Gerald W.; (M) Engineer, Union Carbide; 1107 Scott Rd., 
Kingston, Tenn. 37763 

Womack, Mark; (M) Transportation Training & Rules Examiner, L. 
&. N R. R. Co.; 3229 Westonia Drive, Chattanooga, Tenn. 37412 

HYDERABAD (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 20, Seats 7-8 
Peter, M. Elia; (7) (M) Ed. Secretary, Council of Christian Educa- 
tion, U.M.C.S.A.; 3 Wesley Road, Jabalpur-M.P., India 



The United Methodist Church 47 

Vijendra Kumar, Maddala R.; (4) (M) Accountant; 3-5-867 Hyder- 
guda, Hyderabad-1, A. P. India 

Reserves 

George, Anchiila T.; (M) District Superintendent; Methodist Church, 

Vikarabad- A. P., India 
Gladstone, Herbert S.; (M) Principal; King Kotti Rd., Hyderabad, 

A. P., India 
Moses, Kollur V.; (M) Patron Correspondent; Methodist Boys' High 

School, King Kotti Road, Hyderabad A. P., India 
David, Shanthappa V.; (M) Contractor; Shakamushka Dharga, 

Nampalli, Hyderabad, A. P., India 

IOWA (26) NC 

Sec. B, Rows 22-23, Seats 6-12 

Sec. C, Rows 22-23, Seats 1-6 

*Baskerville, M. Trevor; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 26 Lake- 
view Dr., Mason City, Iowa 50401 
Wilken, Alferd E.; (6) (E) District Superintendent; 610 27th St., 

Sioux City, Iowa 51104 
Nichols, Frank A.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 320 S. Park 

St., Creston, Iowa 50801 
Showmaker, Wayne E.; (2) (M) Director, Program Council; 1019 

Chestnut St., Des Moines, la. 50309 
Garrett, C. Dendy; (3) (M) District Superintendent; 2215 Evelyn 

St., Perry, la. 50220 
Moore, Lester L.; (1) (M) Minister; 605 Grove Ave., Corning, la. 

50841 
Pfaltzgraff, Richard C; (13) (E) Inner City Parish; 3929 38th St., 

Des Moines, la. 50310 
Hann, Paid M.; (9) (M) Minister; 1001 Pleasant St., Des Moines, 

la. 50309 
Dodder, Robert T.; (7) (M) District Superintendent; 120 Zenith Dr., 

Council Bluffs, la. 51501 
Carver, Donald L.; (14) (M) Minister; 3220 Terrace Dr., Cedar Falls, 

la. 50613 
Moore, LeRoy W.; (11) (M) Minister; 3600 75th, Des Moines, la. 

50322 
Metcalf, Kenneth E.; (5) (M) Minister; 109 East 14th, Davenport, 

la. 52803 
Latta, Lloyd A.; (10) (M) Minister; 1002 First Ave. N., Fort Dodge, 

la. 50501 
Long, Maurice K. ; (4) (M) Businessman; Harper Brush Works, 

Fairfield, la. 52556 
Yaggy, Mrs. William H.; (13) (M) Conf. President WSCS; 1914 

40th St., Des Moines, la. 50310 
Sears, Mrs. Edward E.; (7) (M) Vice-Pres. Women's Div., Bd. of 

Missions; 224 18th St. SE, Cedar Rapids, la. 52406 
Applegate, William P.; (11) (M) Maintenance Engineer; Friendship 

Haven, Fort Dodge, Iowa 50501 
Shearer, Paul V.; (2) (M) Attorney; 225 W. Main, Washington, la. 

52353 
Armstrong, Mrs. Robert; (3) (M) Housewife; 370 34th St. SE, Cedar 

Rapids. la. 52403 
Kerber, Phil; (1) (M) Businessman; N. Madison, Emmetsburg, la. 

50536 
Faust, Carl W.; (5) (E) Retired Farmer; 305 S. Illinois, Hubbard, 

la. 50122 



48 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Kreager, Max W.; (9) (M) Businessman; 418 N. 6th Ave. E, New- 
ton, la. 50208 

Hoover, J. Jeffrey; (14) (M) Student; Rudd, la. 50471 

Braun, Mrs. Paul; (10) (E) Housewife; 311 Ivanhoe Rd., Waterloo, 
la. 50701 

Brown, Rainsford A.; (8) (M) Businessman; P. O. Box "S", Betten- 
dorf , la. 52722 

Mannasmith, Dr. Clarence H.; (12) (M) Veterinarian; 706 Cool- 
baugh, Red Oak, Iowa 51566 

Reserves 

Kennedy, Stanley C; (M) Minister; 1112 Vine St., Waterloo, la. 

50703 
Whitenack, Weldon A.; (M) District Superintendent; 920 Robin 

Rd., Muscatine, la. 52761 
Russell, Roger E.; (M) District Superintendent; 1019 Chestnut St., 

Des Moines, la. 50309 
Boulton, Edwin C; (M) District Superintendent; 3475 Crestwood Dr., 

Dubuque, la. 52001 
Kamm, Wayne K.; (M) Minister; Box 125, Plainfield, la. 50666 
Shopshire, James E.; (M) School; Garrett Theological Seminary, 

Evanston, Hlinois 60201 
Campney, Arthur B.; (M) Minister; 501 E. 19th, Newton, la. 50208 
Miller, William T.; (M) Minister; 7th & Arden St., Boone, la. 50036 
Parrott, Glenn R.; (M) Minister; 720 Grand Ave., West Des Moines, 

la. 50265 
Dowd, John A.; (E) Minister; Hiways 20 & 140, Moville, la. 51039 
Crandall, J. Roland; (M) District Superintendent; 408 Bryan Rd., 

Ottumwa, la. 52501 
Strey feller, David E.; (M) Minister; 1400 Bremer Ave., Waverly, 

la. 50677 
Deaver, Leonard E.; (E) District Superintendent; 607 Third Ave. 

SW, Mt. Vernon, la. 52314 
Wilcox, Wilbur F.; (M) Minister; 2622 Lincoln Way, Ames, la. 50010 
Butler, David J.; (M) Attorney; 131/2 S. Federal, Mason City, la. 

50401 
Parker, Clarence E.; (M) Treasurer, Friendship Haven; 1310 S. 21st 

St., Ft. Dodge, la. 50501 
Ritter, Edwin; (M) Businessman; 1003 N. Chestnut, Creston, la. 

50831 
Williams, Paul G.; (M) Farmer; Villisca, la. 50864 
Hoover, Mrs. Robert J.; (M) Housewife; Dike, Iowa 50624 
Young, Harry E.; (M) Businessman; 11 E. Line Rd., Oelwein, la. 

50622 
DeHaan, Dr. Fred; (M) Dentist; Osceola, Iowa 50213 
McCracken, Edgar W.; (M) Businessman; 408 Hampden St., Sioux 

City, la. 51104 
Marty, Dr. Wayne; (E) Professor; Route 2, LeMars, la. 50131 
Underbill, Mrs. Lee; (M) Housewife; 3453 Glencove Lane, Dubuque, 

la. 52001 
Sears, Miss Nancy L.; (M) Student; Route #2, Fontanelle, la. 50846 
Davis, James H.; (M) Professor; Route #3, Ames, la. 50010 
Hulsebus, Douglas; (E) Electrician; 11 Hilltop Rd., Council Bluffs, 

Antes, Charles W.; (M) Attorney; 213 W. Elm, West Union, la. 
52175 



The United Methodist Church 49 

KANSAS EAST (10) SC 
Sec. A, Rows 11-12, Seats 1-5 

* Wright, M. Max; (8) (E) Minister; 2930 Michigan, Topeka, Kansas 

66605 
Haijes, Clare J.; (3) (M) District Superintendent; 6685 Milhaven 

Dr., Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66202 
Holier, Don W.; (6) (M) President, St. Paul Sch. of Theo.; 5123 

Truman Rd., Kansas City, Mo. 64127 
Johnson, Richard E.; (11) (M) District Superintendent; 3020 30th 

Dr., Parsons, Kansas 67357 
Watts, Ewart G.; (9) (M) Minister; 601 Harrison, Topeka, Kansas 

66603 
Coffman, Floyd H.; (2) (M) Judge; Court House, Ottawa, Kansas 

66067 
Stumbo, John E.; (1) (M) Attorney; 703 Capitol Federal Bldg., 

Topeka, Kansas 66603 
Mcintosh, Mrs. Hilda; (13) (M) Housewife; 1244 Oakland, Kansas 

City, Kansas 66102 
Hines, Mrs. Thelma; (7) (E) Minister's wife; R. R. 1, Tecumseh, 

Kansas 66542 
Reitz, T. Russell; (5) (M) Retired; 726 Sunset, Manhattan, Kansas 

66502 

Reserves 

Moore, Robiiison C; (M) Minister; 10211 Nail Ave., Overland Park, 
Kan. 66207 

Hager, Alfred D.; (M) Minister; 5400 West 75th, Prairie Village, 
Kan. 66208 

Kurtz, Merivin R.; (E) District Superintendent; Box 226, Ottawa, 
Kansas 66067 

Hildyard, Hobart R.; (M) District Superintendent; 4201 West 15th 
St., Topeka, Kansas 66604 

Pope, Alton R.; (M) Assoc. Dir., Program Council; Box 4187, Topeka, 
Kansas 66604 

Nothdurft, Clifton G.; (M) Business; 6219 W. 76th St., Prairie Vil- 
lage, Kansas 66208 

Baker, Pamela; (M) Church worker; 8801 West 71st, Shawnee Mis- 
sion, Kansas 66204 

Dean, Mrs. Barton; (M) Housewife; 1608 Thornton, Parsons, Kan. 
67357 

Willmeth, Robert T.; (E) Teacher; 3536 Oakley, Topeka, Kan. 66611 

Becker, Richard L.; (M) Attorney; Coffeyville, Kansas 67337 

KANSAS WEST (12) SC 

Sec. B, Rows 11-12, Seats 7-12 

Borger, Clarence J.; (3) (M) District Superintendent; 449 N. St. 

Francis, Wichita, Kansas 67202 
Blake, Bruce P.; (2) (M) Conf. Program Director; 151 N. Volutsia, 

Wichita, Kansas 67214 
Fogleman, C. M., Jr.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 903 Mellin- 

ger Dr., Salina, Kansas 67401 
Bott, LeRoy A.; (7) (E) District Superintendent; 2903 Hillcrest 

Dr., Hays, Kansas 67601 
Matthew, Glenn E.; (6) (M) Supt. of Ministries; 5407 West 27th 

Terrace, Topeka, Kansas 66614 
Iwig, James H.; (1) (E) Minister; Box 232, Newton, Kansas 67114 
♦Rupert, Thomas; (4) (M) College Vice-President; 844 E. Claflin, 

Salina, Kansas 67401 



50 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Totten, Harold; (13) (E) Farmer; Jewell, Kansas 66949 

Matthaei, Marjorie; (9) (M) Director U.M. Info.; 701 Loch Lom- 
mond, Hutchinson, Kansas 67501 

Renich, Paul W.; (12) (M) College President; Kansas Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, Salina, Kansas 67401 

Hickerson, Walter J.; (8) (M) Conference Treasurer; 151 N. Volutsia, 
Wichita, Kansas 67214 

Hartman, Tom; (14) (M) Pro-Control Boeing; 1703 N. Athenian, 
Wichita, Kansas 67203 

Reserves 

Matthaei, Paul; (M) Minister; 701 Loch Lommond, Hutchinson, Kan- 
sas 67501 

Robinson, Forrest J.; (M) Minister; 285 S. Pershing, Wichita, Kansas 
67218 

Wilke, Richard B.; (M) District Superintendent; 1012 Alexander, 
Winfield, Kansas 67156 

Dunlap, E. Dale; (M) Seminary Dean; 4841 Belinder Ct., Shawnee 
Mission, Kansas 66205 

Jones, J. Karl; (M) District Superintendent; 1808 Crestview Dr., 
Concordia, Kansas 66901 

Findley, William C; (E) Higher Education; Rm. 201, 23 W. Calen- 
dar, La Grange, 111. 60525 

Curtis, Charles M.; (M) Minister; 2220 N. Yale, Wichita, Kansas 
67220 

Mitchell, Everett R.; (M) Minister; 122 N. 8th, Salina, Kansas 67401 

Elliott, Avenell; (M) Director Christian Educ; 1439 E. 4, Winfield, 
Kansas 67156 

Prather, Mary; (M) Conference President WSCS; Box 549, Meade, 
Kansas 67864 

George, Irene; (M) Housewife; St. John, Kansas 67576 

Tyree, E. C; (M) Civil Engineer; 1751 Lorraine, Wichita, Kansas 
67214 

Rymph, Levi; (M) Insurance; 1201 Woodrow, Wichita, Kansas 67203 

Summers, Claude; (M) Banker; Ransom, Kansas 67572 

Thorne, Ralph; (M) Lawyer; 400 W. 23rd, Hutchinson, Kansas 67501 

Adrian, Paul; (E) Realtor; 217 W. Ash, Salina, Kansas 67401 

KENTUCKY (8) SE 
Sec. D, Rows 19-20, Seats 9-12 

*Sweaz7j, Albert W.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 

7172, Lexington, Ky. 40502 
Tullis, Edivard L.; (7) (M) Minister; 2400 Forest, Ashland, Ky. 

41101 
Patton, Russell R.; (13) (M) Minister; 220 W. High, Lexington, Ky. 

40508 
Greene, Horace H.; (6) (M) Area Director, Church & Comm. Develop- 
ment; 165 Eddie, Lexington, Kentucky 40505 
Hager, Cornelius R. ; (3) (M) Asst. Dean; Lexington Pike, Nicholas- 

ville, Kentucky 40356 
Fields, Mrs. Louis H.; (5) (M) Conf. President WSCS; 123 E. Fifth, 

Maysville, Ky. 41056 
Litton, Ray; (4) (M) Automobile Dealer; Box 325, Flemingsburg, 

Ky. 41041 
Kemper, John Q.; (1) (M) Insurance Adjuster; 1626 Elliott, Ashland, 

Ky. 41101 



The United Methodist Church 51 

Reserves 

Durham, Donald W.; (M) Minister; 1716 S. Limestone, Lexington, 
Ky. 40503 

Dorsey, Harold W.; (M) Minister; 1774 Bryan Station Rd., Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky 40505 

Kays, Onie U.; (M) District Superintendent; 613 E. Main, Danville, 
Ky. 40422 

Curry, Earl T.; (M) District Superintendent; Edgemont Rd., Mays- 
ville, Ky. 41056 

Mayfield, Robert G.; (M) Vice President Development; Asbury Theo- 
logical Seminary, Wilmore, Kentucky 40390 

Bean, Frank; (M) Direc. of Development, Ky. State College, 302 
Lexington, Ky. 40503 

Rouse, C. R.; (M) Retired School Teacher; 103 Bramble, Highland 
Heights, Kentucky 41076 

Seals, Taylor; (M) Retired School Teacher; 772 Caden, Lexington, 
Kentucky 40505 



KL4NGSI (2) OS 



No delegates elected 



LIBERIA (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 12, Seats 9-10 

* Roberts, Samuel T.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 75 Ashmun 

St., Monrovia, Liberia WCA 
Dennis, Charles C, Sr. ; (4) (M) Member House of Rep.; Corner, 

Carey and Johnson St., Monrovia, Liberia 

Reserves 

Weeks, Monroe T.; (M) 

Togba, Joseph S. ; (M) Medical Doctor; Oldest Congotown, Monrovia, 
Liberia WCA 

LITTLE ROCK (6) SC 

Sec. D, Rows 7-8, Seats 10-12 

*Hozendorf, C. Ray; (9) (M) District Superintendent; 715 Center 

Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 
Martin, George W.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 803 Cupp 

Drive, Arkadelphia, Ar. 71923 
Bearden, Robert E. L.; (14) (M) Minister; 723 Center Street, Little 

Rock, Ar. 72201 
Carlton, Gordon B.; (12) (M) Attorney; P. 0. Box E, DeQueen, 

Arkansas 71832 
Davenport, Mrs. E. T.; (7) (M) Housewife; 6G24 Longwood Rd., 

Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 
Hall, Carl C; (2) (M) Manufacturer; 46 Edgehill, Little Rock, 

Arkansas 72205 

Reserves 

Murray, Alvin C; (M) Minister; 201 S. Hill, El Dorado, Ark. 71730 
Bagley, Roy I.; (M) District Superintendent; 484 Elaine Ave. S. W., 

Camden, Ark. 71701 
Hale, Ralph E.; (M) Minister; 841 Quapaw, Hot Springs, Ar. 71901 
Major, James E.; (M) College Vice Pres.; Hendrix College, Conway, 

Ar 72032 
AUman, S. H.; (M) Retired; 201 Pecan, Hot Springs, Ar. 71901 



52 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Shepard, William M.; (M) Retired; 209 Sibley Rd., Little Rock, Ar. 

Hillis, Raymond; (M) Merchant; 426 Main St., Malvern, Ar. 72104 
Booth, Dale; (M) Utility Exec; 6911 Skywood Rd., Little Rock, Ar. 
72207 

LOUISIANA (12) SC 
Sec. C, Rows 18-19, Seats 7-12 

*Oliphint, Benjamin R.; (3) (M) Minister; 5243 Whitehaven, Baton 
Rouge, La. 70802 

Handy, W. T., Jr.; (6) (M) Vice-Pres. Methodist Publishing House; 
201 8th Ave., So., Nashville, Tennessee 37202 

Galloway, Benedict A.; (11) (M) Minister; 1421 Constantinople, New 
Orleans, Louisiana 70115 

Cooke, Jack; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 839 Monrovia St., 
Shreveport, La. 71106 

Harrington, Robert F.; (12) (M) District Superintendent; 4600 Pren- 
tiss Ave., New Orleans, La. 70126 

Stovall, James L.; (9) (M) Minister; 2512 Margie St., Metairie, La. 
70003 

Matheny, Thomas H.; (1) (M) Attorney; P. O. Box 221, Hammond, 
La. 70401 

McGowan, Mrs. Charles B.; (7) (M) Homemaker; 2081 Ferndale 
Ave., Baton Rouge, La. 70808 

Blanchard, Hubert M.; (5) (M) Insurance; P. O. Box 462, Sul- 
plur, Louisiana 70663 

Cotton, William Davis; (2) (M) Attorney; P. O. Box 719, Rayville, 
La. 71269 

Netterville, G. Leon; (4) (M) Southern University Pres.; 1870 Hard- 
ing Blvd., Baton Rouge, La. 70807 

Brown, Allen L.; (13) (M) Insurance Executive; 2059 Abundance 
St., New Orleans, La. 70122 

Reserves 

McGuire, Douglas L.; (M) District Superintendent; 4044 S. Ramsey 
St., Baton Rouge, La. 70808 

Dykes, David L., Jr.; (M) Minister; 623 Oak Hills, Shreveport, La., 
71106 

Haynes, L. L., Jr.; (M) Minister; P. O. Box 1841, Baton Rouge, La. 
70802 

Caraway, James J.; (M) District Superintendent; P. O. Box 1466, 
Hammond, La. 70401 

Cain, Wesley Ralph; (M) District Superintendent; 319 Glendale Dr., 
Ruston, La. 71270 

Hearn, J. Woodrow; (M) Dir. Program Council; P. 0. Box 4325, 
Shreveport, La. 71104 

Rickey, Henry A.; (M) Minister; 3427 Somerset Dr., New Orleans, 
La. 70114 

Bland, Cecil E.; (M) Assoc. Dir. Program Council; P. 0. Box 4325, 
Shreveport, La. 71104 

Patrick, William H.; (M) Professor; 526 Kimbro, Baton Rouge, La. 
70808 

Mason, L. Keith; (M) M. D. & Surgeon; 852 McCormick St., Shreve- 
port, La. 71104 

Ward, Truman L.; (M) District Lay Leader; 500 Walker St., New Or- 
leans, La. 70124 

Snow, Dudley V.; (M) Insurance Executive; 1500 N. Market St., 
Shreveport, La. 71269 



The United Methodist Chuich 53 

Laskey, Mrs. Glenn E.; (M) Homemaker; 710 N. Vienna St., Ruston, 

La. 71270 
Tubb, John; (M) Dept. of Agriculture; 5909 Tall Pine Drive, Pine- 

ville, La. 71360 

LOUISVILLE (8) SE 

Sec. B., Rows 20-21, Seats 9-12 

"Shepherd, Paul; (5) (M) Minister; 2000 Douglass Blvd., Louisville, 

Kentucky 40205 
Wood, George S.; (6) (M) Council Director; 1115 S. Fourth St., 

Louisville, Kentucky 40203 
James, William E.; (3) (M) College President; Kentucky Wesleyan 

College, Owensboro, Kentucky 42301 
Randolph, Allan H. L.; (2) (M) Minister; 2207 Plantation Dr., Louis- 
ville, Kentucky 40216 
Jenkins, Tom; (4) (M) College Vice-President; Owensboro, Kentucky 

42301 
Arterburn, Mrs. Jane; (7) (M) Homemaker; Park City, Kentucky 

42160 
Peters, Dr. C. Kenneth; (5) (M) Medical Doctor; 10407 Taylorsville 

Rd., Louisville, Kentucky 40299 
Sanders, Felix J.; (9) (M) Attorney; 506 Briar Hill Rd., Louisville, 

Ky. 40206 

Reserves 

Slider, W. W.; (M) Minister; 4614 Brownsboro Rd., Louisville, Ken- 
tucky 40207 

McAdams, Emil; (M) Minister; 1829 Stratford Dr., Owensboro, Ken- 
tucky 42301 

Russell, E. A.; (E) Minister; 705 N. Main, Tompkinsville, Kentucky 
42167 

Perkins, Rual T.; (M) District Superintendent; 203 Cherokee Dr., 
Campbellsville, Ky. 42718 

Pullen, Harry A., Jr.; (M) District Superintendent; 504 Hill Ridge 
Rd., Louisville Ky. 40214 

Curry, James S.; (M) Minister; 3814 Illinois, Lousiville, Ky. 40213 

Cockrill, Willard; (M) Professor; 57 Highland Dr., Bowling Green, 
Kentucky 42101 

Dowse, Mrs. Richard K.; (M) Pres. Conference WSCS; 27 Highland 
Dr., Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 

Evans, Evan C; (M) Real Estate Broker; Smallhouse Rd., Bowling 
Green, Kentucky 42101 

Green, Mrs. Thomas P.; (M) Medical Secretary; 407 N. Hite, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky 40206 

Ewing, William K.; (M) Executive Nat'l Products; 900 Baxter, 
Louisville, Kentucky 40204 

Biggers, Gilbert M.; (M) Real Estate; Fairview Bldg., Bowling 
Green, Kentucky 42101 

LUCKNOW (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 5, Seats 11-12 
Doss, Christopher S.; (6) (M) Minister; Methodist Church, 109, 

Cantonment, Lucknow 
Charan, Miss Sophie; (7) (M) Evangelist; Mission House, P. O. 

Gajadharganj, Buxur, Bihar 

Reserves 
David, Nirmal; (M) Minister; Methodist English Church, 88, Can- 
tonment, Kanpur 



54 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Nathan, James; (M) Minister; Methodist Church, 26, Tashkent Road, 

Allahabad 
Shigh, Rathhan; (M) Minister; Centenniel High School, Lucknow 
Prasad, Jones C; (M) Minister; Methodist Church, Daliganj, Luck- 
now 
Singh, Robert M.; (M) Minister; Methodist Church, Arrah, Bihar 
Titus, D. P.; (M) Minister; c/o 109, Cantonment, Lucknow 
Mandrelle, J. P. G.; (M) Minister; N. I. Tract and Book Society, 

Allahabad 
Singh, Jai; (M) Mission Worker; Lucknow Publishing House, 37, 

Cantonment Road, Lucknow 
Washington, Donald S.; (M) Accountant; Christ Church College, 

Lucknow 
Franklin, A. T. ; (M) Teacher; Christ Church Inter-College, Kawpur 
Chand, Mrs. Shirin L; (M) Teacher; Lalbagh Girls InterCollege, 

Lucknow 
Dass, Prema; (M) Evangelist; 109, Cantonment Road; Lucknow 
Shyamlal, L. B.; (M) Clerk; c/o Methodist Church, Arrah, Bihar 
Prakash, Jyoti; (M) Teacher; c/o Methodist Church, Civil Lines, 

Ballia, U. P. 
Wallace, Miss Lillian; (M) Manager, Hudson Girls School, Kanpur 
Franklin, Miss Dorris; (M) Editor; Lucknow Publishing House, 

Lucknow 

MADHYA PRADESH (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 11, Seats 9-10 

Peter, Victor; (1) (M) Minister; Methodist Church, Hawabagh, 
Jabalpur, M. P. India 

Raoji, Ashok K.; (4) (M) Rly. Employee; Methodist Mission Com- 
pound, Khandwa, M. P. India 

Reserves 

Sham Roa, Prabhakar D.; (M) Minister; 214 Civil Lines, Jabalpur, 

M. P. India 
Radhakrishati, John; (M) Principal; Leonard Theological College, 

Jabalpur, M. P. India 
Singh, Ratan K.; (M) District Superintendent; Methodist Church, 

Khandwa, M.P. India 
Hulasi Rae, John V.; (M) Treasurer; All-India Provident Fund, 21 

Club Back Road, Byculla, Bombay— 8 (BC) 
Singh, Prem P.; (M) Teacher; Mission School, Baihar, Balaghat, 

M. P. India 
Singh, Fowler M.; (M) Accountant; S. D. C, P. W. D. (B & R) Suk- 

ma, Bastar, M. P. India 
Thomas, Miss Aley; (M) Principal; Hawabagh Women's College, 

Jabalpur, M. P. India 
Lall, Miss Premlata; (M) Principal; Mission Middle School, Khand- 
wa, M. P. India 

MAINE (2) NE 
Sec. B, Row 14, Seats 10-11 

"Ellis, S. Blake; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 226 Bradley St., 

Portland, Maine 04103 
Danforth, Merrill A.; (2) (M) Business Man; Route lA, Gardiner, 

Maine 04345 



The United Methodist Church 55 

Reserves 

Ives, S. Clifton; (M) Minister; 119 S. Park St., Bang-or, Maine 04401 
Smith, H. Travers; (M) Minister; 61 Pleasant St., Waterville, 

Maine 04901 
Hoivland, Leslie W.; (M) District Superintendent; 4 Brentwood R., 

Augusta, Maine 14330 
Woodbury, Harvey; (M) Engineer; 36 Megunticook St., Camden, 

Maine 04843 
Curtis, George E.; (M) Business; 25 Rackleff St., Portland, Maine 

04103 
Pratt, Horace A.; (M) Retired; Bennoch Rd., Orono, Maine 04473 

MEMPHIS (10) SE 
Sec. C, Rows 16-17, Seats 7-11 

*Fisher, James A., Sr.; (3) (M) District Superintendent; 555 Perkins 

Ext., Suite 224, Memphis, Tennessee 38117 
Bailey, William P., Jr.,; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 105 N. 

Seventh, Suite 220, Paducah, Kentucky 42001 
McRae, Frank L.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 2600 Poplar, 

Suite 517, Memphis, Tennessee 38112 
Ramier, Lloyd W.; (13) (M) Minister; 4155 Minden Rd., Memphis, 

Tenn, 38117 
Bobbins, Carl M.; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 206 Elks Build- 
ing, Jackson, Tenn. 38301 
Pevahouse, Joseph N.; (4) (M) Pharmacist; Box 224, Henderson, 

Tenn. 38340 
Lamb, Mrs. Wayne A.; (7) (M) Housewife; 110 Ogburn St., Paris, 

Tenn. 38242 
Bond, R. H.; (5) (M) Bell Telephone Co.; Drawer 808, Dyersburg, 

Tenn. 38042 
Yancey, Charles L.; (2) (M) Salesman; 3226 James Rd., Memphis, 

Tenn. 38128 
Adams, Lloyd S., Jr.; (9) (M) Lawyer; 306 Forest Dr., Humboldt, 

Tenn. 38343 

Reserves 

Douglass, Paul F.; (M) Minister; 301 Main St., Martin, Tenn. 38237 

Henton, Jack H.; (M) Minister; Box 340, Bartlett, Tenn. 38005 

Laney, James T.; (M) Dean, Candler Sch. Theol.; 2080 Renault Lane, 
Atlanta, Ga. 30305 

Mulroy, James R.; (M) District Superintendent; P. O. Box 207, Lex- 
ington, Tenn. 38351 

Lawson, James M; (M) Minister; 653 Alston Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 
38126 

Hester, John S.; (M) Chemical Engineer; 272 Old Orchard Rd., Padu- 
cah, Kentucky 42001 

Stratton, Leslie M., Ill; (M) Merchant; 105 E. Cherry Dr., Memphis, 
Tenn. 38117 

Stephenson, Roy C; (M) Assoc. Prog. Dir., Conf. Prog. Council; 432 
Arlington, Jackson, Tennessee 38301 

Brewster, Jerry G.; (M) Dentist; 5144 Pilgram, Memphis, Tenn. 
38116 

Page, Mrs. Dennis E.; (M) Housewife; 507 High St., Trenton, Tenn. 
38382 

MID-CHINA (2) OS 

No delegates elected 



56 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

MIDDLE PHILIPPINES (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 6, Seats 11-12 

Rodriguez, Moises M.; (M) (Deceased) 

Llenado, Abigael C. ; (M) Businesswoman; Llenado Poultry Farm, 
Valenzuela, Bulacan, Philippines 

Reserves 

Adriano, Santos M.; (M) District Superintendent; The United Metho- 
dist Church, Orani, Bataan, Philippines 

Mercado, LaVerne D.; (M) 900 United Nations Ave., Manila, Philip- 
pines 

Suarez, Reynaldo L. ; (M) Lawyer; The United Methodist Church, 
Angeles City, Philippines 

MINDANAO (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 3, Seats 1-2 

*Guiang, Condrado G.; (5) (M) Minister; Central United Methodist 
Church, 328 C. M. Recto, Davao City, Philippines 0-404 

Bibay, Francisco A., Jr.; (4) (M) Bank Cashier; 133-A, V. Mapua 
St., Davao City, Philippines, 0-404 

Reserves 

Garibay, Limerio €.; (M) Minister; First United Methodist Church, 
416 Vinzon St., Obrero, Davo City, Philippines 0-404 

Mapanao, Alfredo C; (M) Gov't Employee; Koronodal, South Cota- 
bato, Philippines 0-205 

MINNESOTA (12) NC 

Sec. C, Rows 22-23, Seats 7-12 

*Purdhavi, Charles B.; (6) (M) Conf. Program Dir.; 122 W. Frank- 
lin Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 55404 
Christianson, Lyle T.; (7) (M) Minister; 1524 W. City Rd. C-2, 

St. Paul, Minn. 55113 
Allin, Willard S.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 1801 10th St., 

N.E., Rochester, Minn. 55901 
Krueger, Delton H.; (11) (M) Minister; 807 First St., Princeton, 

Minn. 55371 
Dunn, Merle A.; (2) (E) Minister; 410 13th Ave., S. E., Rochester, 

Minn. 55901 
Hanks, Stanley G.; (9) (M) Minister; 204 1st Ave., N. W., Austin, 

Minn. 55912 
Melgren, Wesley A.; (8) (E) Accountant; 5836 Oakland Ave., S., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 55407 _ ., 

Schreiber, Lyle J.; (1) (E) Postmaster; 618 S. E. 1st St., Faribault, 

Minn. 55021 ^ „ ,,. 

Espie, John C; (4) (M) Executive; 7439 14th Ave., S., Minneapolis, 

Minn. 55423 
Haining, Kathleen L.; (14) (M) Secretary; 605 Runestone Dr., 

Alexandria, Minn. 56308 „ . ^ r,. 

Harkness, Leonard L.; (5) (M) Program Director 4H; 1879 Tatum, 

St., Paul, Minn. 55113 , ..„. t. t.- 

Gridley, Dorothy R.; (3) (M) Homemaker; 1960 E. River Terrace, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 55414 

Reserves 
Praetorius, E. R.; (E) District Superintendent; 122 W. Franklin 

Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 55404 



The United Methodist Church 57 

Walker, Gerald V.; (E) District Superintendent; 1225 W. River 
Dr., Mankato, Minn. 56001 

Walker, H. T.; (M) District Superintendent; 331 S. W. 8th St., 
Wadena, Minn. 56482 

Beck, Kenneth O.; (M) Minister; 308 3rd Ave. S., St. Cloud, Minn. 
56301 

Sweet, Charles R.; (M) Minister; 717 Hwy. 7, Hopkins, Minn. 55343 

Nicholas, Clarence R.; (M) District Superintendent; 424 Golf Ter- 
race, Litchfield, Minn. 55355 

Ireland, Wayne L.; (M) District Superintendent; 3410 Greysolon 
PI., Duluth, Minn. 55804 

Richardson, Sam; (E) Advertising; 4044 Oakland Ave., S., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 55407 

Fletcher, Fremont; (M) Attorney; 6809 Coi-nelia Dr., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 55435 

Forsberg, Winfield; (M) Realtor; 518 Summit, New Ulm, Minn. 
56073 

Larson, Norma; (M) Conf. Pres. WSCS; 2401 Jewell Lane, So. 
St. Paul, Minn. 55075 

Rice, Calvin C. ; (M) Prog. Management; 1424 Winsor Chase Dr., 
S. W., Rochester, Minn. 55901 

Kerns, Willis; (M) Ford Motor Co.; 3822 E. 49th St., Minneapolis, 
Minn. 55417 

Faber, Fran; (M) Advertising; Rt. 5, Box 148 W., Excelsior, Minn. 
55331 

MISSISSIPPI (C) (2) SE 
Sec. D, Row 18, Seats 10-11 

*Taylor, Wendell P. C; (13) (M) Minister; 777 Ewing St., Jackson, 

Miss. 39203 
Calbert, Wayne F.; (4) (M) Conf. Lay Leader; The Methodist 

Bldg, 321 Mississippi St., Jackson, Mississippi 39201 

Reserves 

None 

MISSISSIPPI (8) SE 

Sec. D, Rows 9-10, Seats 9-12 
*Leggett, John W., Jr.; (6) (M) Dir. Meth. Action Crusade; 5831 

King's PL, Jackson, Miss. 39211 
Jones, George E.; (9) (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 956, Laurel, Miss. 

39440 
Matheny, Robert M.; (3) (M) District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 

303, Jackson, Miss. 39205 
Dement, Frank E., Jr.; (8) (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 1009, Hatties- 

burg, Miss. 39401 
Satterfield, John C; (2) (M) Attorney; P. 0. Box 466, Yazoo City, 

Miss. 39194 
Jordan, Bert; (5) (M) Conf. Program Council; 321 Mississippi St., 

Jackson, Miss. 39201 
Moorhead, Edwin E.; (4) (M) Hydraulic Engineer; P. O. Box 691, 

Vicksburg, Miss. 39180 ^ ^ ^ 

Smith, Mrs. Marshall; (7) (M) Homemaker & Conf. Pres. W.S.C.S.; 

4248 Warrenton Rd., Vicksburg, Miss. 39180 

Reserves 

Peden, Homer C; (M) District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 629. 
Brookhaven, Miss. 39601 



58 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Kates, Robert L.; (M) Minister; Box 1092, Jackson, Miss. 39205 
Smith, Aubrey B.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 1126, Meridian, 

Miss. 39401 
Dickson, Nathan A.; (M) District Superintendent; 2004 Highland 

PL, Vicksburg, Miss. 39180 
Duke, Charles D.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 234, Gulf port. 

Miss 39501 
Cranberry, Seth W.; (M) Minister; 5301 Old Canton Rd., Jackson, 

Miss. 39211 
Breland, A. Dan; (M) Banker; Box 610, Crystal Springs, Miss. 39059 
Alford, J. W.; (M) Merchant; Box 727, 416 Mississippi St., McComb, 

Miss. 39648 
Egger, John F.; (M) Finance; 2314 Poplar Springs Dr., Meridian, 

Miss. 39301 
Hays, Ralph; (deceased) 

Johnson, Carroll; (M) Accountant; Rt. 1, Saucier, Miss. 39574 
Wilson, Earl R.; (M) Attorney; 3851 Eastover Dr., Jackson, Miss. 

39211 

MISSOURI EAST (8) SC 

Sec. A, Rows 19-20, Seats 1-4 
Doggett, John N., Jr.; (1) (M) Minister; 1141 Belt Ave., St. Louis, 

Mo. 63112 
Montgomery, John C, Jr.; (9) (M) District Superintendent; 511 

N. Carleton, Farmington, Mo. 63640 
Bryan, Monk; (7) (M) Minister; 9th & Locust, Columbia, Mo. 65201 
Ward, John W., Jr.; (6) (M) Minister; 600 Bompart Ave., Webster 

Groves, Mo. 63119 
Hawkins, J. Clinton; (4) (M) Business Executive, Retired; 7421 

Warwick Dr., St. Louis, Mo. 63121 
McCullough, Mrs. Ralph; (7) (M) Teacher; 15 Donald St., Flat 

River, Mo. 63601 
Swofford, Mrs. Ross; (13) (M) Homemaker; 2308 Powell Dr., Colum- 
bia, Mo. 65201 
Allison, William F.; (5) (M) Engineering Mgr.; 7843 Contour Dr., 

St. Louis, Mo. 63121 

Reserves 

Kinnard, Cannon; (M) Conference Program Director; 101 N. 

Bemiston, St. Louis, Mo. 63105 
Wagner, Joseph H.; (deceased) 
Stein, Neil L.; (M) Minister; 3770 McKelvey Rd., Bridgeton, Mo. 

63042 
Slover, Donald L.; (M) Minister; 209 S. High, Jackson, Mo. 63755 
Napier, Charles E.; (M) Minister; 6199 Waterman Ave., St. Louis, 

Mo. 63112 
Tucker, Frank C, Jr.; (M) District Superintendent; 55 Plaza Square, 

St. Louis, Mo. 63103 
Sonnenday, Mrs. Margaret; (M) Homemaker; 7490 Teasdale, St. 

Louis, Mo. 63130 
Schupp, Oscar G.; (M) Retired Teacher; 1217 Bald Hill Rd., Jefferson 

City, Mo. 65101 
Clardy, Mrs. Clarence; (M) Social Worker; 6199 Waterman, St. 

Louis, Mo. 63130 
Chaney, Tom; (M) Research Engineer; 12633 Brumley Dr., 

Bridgeton, Mo. 63044 



The United Methodist Church 59 

Brankhorst, Mrs. Edward; (M) Homemaker; 569 W. Glendale Rd., 

Webster Groves, Mo. 63119 
McCartney, Mrs. Victor; (E) Homemaker; 5906 Jefferson, Kinloch, 

Mo. 63140 

MISSOURI WEST (12) SC 

Sec. B, Rows 11-12, Seats 1-6 
*Ward, A. Sterling; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 410 Holland 

Bldg., Springfield, Mo. 65806 
Gray, C. Jarrett, St.; (5) (M) Minister; 1834 Woodland, Kansas 

City, Mo. 64108 
Johnston, Kenneth C; (3) (M) Minister; 7310 W. Hwy. 71, N. W., 

Kansas City, Mo. 64116 
Standard, Forrest L.; (11) (M) Minister; 7205 Longview Rd., Kansas 

City, Mo. 64134 
Firestone, Lyman; (2) (M) Minister; 3101 E.N.E. Winn Rd., Kansas 

City, Mo. 64117 
Davis, Sidney E.; (10) (E) Minister; 1730 Byers Ave., Joplin, Mo. 

64801 
Gailey, Mrs. Beulah; (7) (M) Housewife; 615 Bennett, Springfield, 

Mo. 65804 
Speer, Aubrey B.; (4) (M) Conference Treasurer; 1512 Van Brunt 

Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64127 
McCall, Kenneth A.; (13) (M) Architect; 1200 W. 39th, Kansas 

City, Mo. 64111 
Cagna, Mrs. Betty; (9) (M) Housewife; 2222 McKinley, Lexington, 

Mo. 64067 
Hampton, Mrs. Mary.; (1) (M) Director, Child Care Center; 3531 

Bellefontaine, Kansas City, Mo. 64128 
Scott, Ralph; (12) (M) Superintendent of Schools; 1315 Sixth, 

Monett, Mo. 65708 

Reserves 
Arbaugh, Robert N.; (M) Minister; Box 1356 S.S.S., Springfield, 

Mo. 65805 
Caldwell, Charles W.; (M) Conf. Prog. Director; 1512 Van Brunt 

Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64127 
Winter, Hauser; (M) Minister; 406 W. 74th, Kansas City, Mo. 64114 
Poe, George; (M) District Superintendent; Box 69, Maryville, Mo. 

64468 
Prater, Arnold; (M) District Superintendent; 1102 E. 28th, Joplin, 

Mo. 64801 
Soxman, Lee F., Jr.; (M) District Superintendent; 1512 Van Brunt 

Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64127 
Swinney, John R.; (M) Credit Mgr., Sears, Roebuck; 5900 N. Belton, 

Kansas City, Mo. 64151 
Mehl, Mrs. Blanche; (M) Housewife; 121 W. 48th, Kansas City, 

Mo. 64111 
Denman, James E.; (M) Banker; Nevada, Missouri 65772 
Walker, E. C; (M) Executive Director, GEO; Box 328, Maryville, 

Mo. 64468 
Hall, N. Guy; (M) Mfg. Concrete Block; 928 S. Glenstone, Springfield, 

Mo. 65802 
Patterson, Joyce Raye; (M) Deaconess; 200 Cherokee, St. Joseph, 

Mo. 64504 

MORADABAD (2) OS 

Sec. B, Rows 13-14, Seats 12 
*Massey, Daniel B.; (6) (M) District Supt.; Methodist Church, 
Civil Lines, Moradabad, U.P. India 



60 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Dayal, Dr. Christo D.; (10) (M) Medical Practice; Policlinic, 
Rampur, U. P. India 

Reserves 

Masih, Komal; (M) Teacher; North India Theological College, 95, 

Civil Lines, Bareilly, U. P. India 
Sinha, Miss Satyavati S.; (M) Principal; Methodist Girls College, 

Moradabad, U. P. India 

NEBRASKA (12) SC 

Sec. C, Rows 18-19, Seats 1-6 

*Clark, Alva H.; (7) (M) Minister; 5410 Corby, Omaha, Nebraska 

68104 
Wichelt, John F.; (6) (E) Conf. Program Dir.; Box 4553, 2641 N. 

49, Lincoln, Nebraska 68504 
Hicks, Kenneth W.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 3120 Ninth 

Ave., Kearney, Neb. 68847 
Streeter, Emmett T.; (10) (M) District Superintendent; Box 4553, 

2641 N. 49, Lincoln, Neb. 68504 
Kruse, Lowen V.; (3) (M) Minister; Box 414, Broken Bow, Neb. 

68822 
Mikkelsen, John H.; (12) (M) District Superintendent; 1402 W. 2nd 

St., McCook, Neb. 69001 
Dunlap, G.Alan; (1) (M) Banker; Milford, Neb. 68405 
Urbom, Warren K.; (5) (M) Judge; Rm. 333, P. O. Bldg., Lincoln, 

Neb. 68501 
Poppe, Odin W.; (4) (E) Postal Dept.; 1023 W. 9th St., Grand Island, 

Neb. 68801 
Frey, John H.; (9) (M) Exec. Sec, Lincoln Fdn.; 2441 Bradfield 

Dr., Lincoln, Neb. 68502 
Ferris, Mrs. E. L.; (2) (M) Homemaker; Archer, Nebraska 68816 
Harrington, Mrs. Wayne W.; (11) (M) Pres., Women's Div., Bd. of 

Missions; 4903 California Ave., Omaha, Neb. 68122 

Reserves 

Roker, Donald R.; (E) District Superintendent; 2608 Prospect Ave., 

Norfolk, Neb. 68701 
Bond, Nye O.; (M) District Superintendent; 357 Farm Credit Bldg., 

19th & Douglas, Omaha, Neb. 68102 
Munden, C. Ebb, III; (M) Minister; 2723 N. 50th St., Lincoln, Neb. 

68504 
Murphy, C. Edwin; (M) District Superintendent; 2538 N. St. Patrick, 

Grand Island, Neb. 68801 
Davis, Laurence R.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 4553, 2641 

N. 49th, Lincoln, Neb. 68504 
Wihnoth, Rodney E.; (M) Minister; 6001 Fontenelle Blvd., Omaha, 

Neb. 68111 
Ireland, Melvon L.; (M) Minister; 4530 A St., Lincoln, Neb. 68510 
Berg, Darrel E.; (M) Minister; 1345 S. 16th St., Lincoln, Neb. 68502 
Sukovaty, Norbert; (E) Insurance; 1800 Broadmoore Dr., Lincoln, 

Neb. 68506 
Savery, Gilbert M.; (E) Newspaper Editor; 4121 Fiene Blvd., Lin- 
coln, Neb. 68502 
Cobb, Mrs. Ed; (M) Homemaker; Ogallala, Nebraska 69153 
Flaming, Wilbert K.; (M) Farmer; Box 114, Elsie, Neb. 69134 
Sugden, Mrs. Virgil; (M) Homemaker; Douglas, Neb. 68344 
Mead, Mrs. Charles W.; (M) Homemaker; 5122 Davenport, Omaha, 

Neb. 68132 



The United Methodist Church 61 

Marquardt, Mrs. A. W.; (M) Homemaker; 1130 S. 47th St., Lincoln, 

Neb. 68510 
Norris, Mrs. Clyde; (M) Conf. Pres. WSCS; 4032 Mohawk, Lincoln, 

Neb. 68510 

NEW HAMPSHIRE (2) NE 
Sec. A, Row 3, Seats 5-6 

*Keeffe, William R.; (13) (M) Superintendent; 13 Springfield St., 

Concord, N. H. 03301 
Laraba, Forest W.; (2) (M) Vice Pres. Printing; 31 Woodman 

St., Manchester, N. H. 03103 

Reserves 

None 

NEW MEXICO (6) SC 

Sec. C, Rows 7-8, Seats 10-12 

Caswell, Bervin 0.; (6) (M) Dist. Supt.; 1412 Piedmont, Clovis, 

N. M. 88101 
Goodwin, Burnie C, Jr.; (2) (M) Dist. Supt.; 1203 S. Country Club, 

Carlsbad, N. M. 88220 
Stewart, Martin B.; (5) (M) Dist. Supt.; 6401 Belton Rd., El Paso, 

Texas 79912 
Butler, Randle; (7) (M) Farmer; 1319 Plum, Pecos, Texas 79772 
Ford, Frank B.; (13) (M) Insurance; 600 El Paso Natl. Bank Bldg., 

El Paso Texas 79901 
Steele, Sam; (4) (M) Rancher; Box 432, Fort Sumner, N. M. 88119 

Reserves 

Williams, Ira E., Jr.; (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 1638, Albuquerque, 

N. M. 87103 
Stone, Meredith C; (M) Minister; 10525 Candlewood, El Paso, Texas 

79925 
Hamilton, Edward E.; (M) Minister; 3501 Huec6, El Paso, Texas 

79903 
Moore, Mrs. Homer; (M) Homemaker; 3405 Clearmont, Odessa, 

Texas 79760 
Patten, William C; (M) Insurance; 608 Arboles NW, Albuquerque, 

N. M. 87107 
Stovall, Travis; (M) School Admin.; 1512 Arizona, Alamogordo, 

N. M. 88310 

NEW YORK (18) NE 

Sec. A, Rows 21-22-23, Seats 1-6 

James, William M.; (2) (M) Minister; 1981 Madison Ave., New 

York, N. Y. 10035 _ , 

Skeete, F. Herbert; (7) (M) Minister; 240 Nagle Ave., New York, 

N. Y. 10034 
Bosley, Harold A.; (1) (M) Minister; 520 Park Ave., New York, 

N. Y. 10021 , ^^ „ 

Carrington, John E.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 60 Harvard 

Ave., Rockville Centre, N. Y. 11570 „ . , . ,^. t^- 

Barton, Charles A.; (5) (M) Minister; 31 Smith Ave., Mt. Kisco, 

New York 10549 ^, „.„ x^ ^ x,i 

Parker, Richard S.; (11) (M) Minister; 22 Slate Hill Dr., Poughkeep- 

sie. N. Y. 12603 



62 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Thornburg, Richard A.; (6) (M) Minister; 718 West Avenue, Nor- 

walk, Conn. 06850 
Verdin, Douglas F.; (13) (M) Minister; 1 Raymond PL, Westport, 

Conn. 06880 
Cotto-T homer, Alfredo; (10) (M) Minister; 67 Manhattan Ave., 

Brooklyn, New York 11206 
*Preusch, Robert W.; (2) (M) C.P.A.; 74 Trinity PL, New York, 

N. Y. 10006 
Winton, Jeanette; (7) (M) Conf. President WSCS; 6911 N. Main 

St., Stratford, Conn. 06497 
Darling, Howard H.; (8) (M) Conference Treasurer; 210 Boston 

Post Rd., Rye, New York 10580 
Brown, William E.; (3) (M) Traffic Manager; 742 St. Lawrence 

Ave., Bronx, New York 10472 
Current, Gloster C; (1) (M) NAACP Executive; 100-30 203 St., 

Hollis, New York 11423 
Collins, Mabel E.; (9) (M) Administrative Staff Member; 920-5 

Baychester Ave., Bronx, New York 10475 
Staubach, William T., Jr., (4) (M) Bank Vice-President; 120 Ancon 

Ave., Pelham, New York 10803 
Northrop, George M.; (12) (M) Attorney; 396 Grand St., Newburgh, 

New York 12550 
Aponte, Ramon; (14) (M) Accountant; 332 W. 47th St., New York, 

N. Y. 10036 

Reserves 

Wolf, Wilmert H.; (E) Minister; 732 Donlon Ave., W. Hempstead, 

N. Y. 11552 
Abel, Paul F.; (M) Assoc. Conf, Program Director; 210 Boston 

Post Rd., Rye, New York 10580 
Spoor, Ralph E.; (M) District Superintendent; 20 Broadfield Rd., 

Hamden, Conn. 06517 
Collins, John C; (M) Assoc. Conf. Program Director; 210 Boston 

Post Rd., Rye, New York 10580 
Kirkland, H. Burnham; (M) Conference Program Director; 210 

Boston Post Rd., Rye, New York 10580 
Gates, Matthew H.; (M) District Superintendent; 791 Newfield Ave., 

Stamford, Conn. 06905 
Nugent, Randolph W.; (M) NCCC Executive; 475 Riverside Dr., 

New York, N. Y. 10027 
Hunter, C. Pershing; (M) Minister; 12 Hampton Rd., Port Wash- 
ington, N. Y. 11050 
Reed William B.; (M) District Superintendent; 5 Post Rd., E, 

Williston, New York 11596 
Marsland, Irving A., Jr.; (M) Minister; 40 Washington St., Hemp- 
stead, New York 11550 
Eversley, John C; (M) N. Y. Transit Authority; 875 St. Marks 

Ave., Brooklyn, New York 11213 
Burkitt, Olga; (M) Cokesbury Asst. Store Manager; 65 Columbia 

St., New York, N. Y. 10002 
Veale, William H.; (M) President Safty Foundation; West Rock 

Rd., New Haven, Conn. 06515 
Atkinson, Sydney H.; (M) Business Consultant; Box 26, N. Baldwin, 

Baldwin, N. Y. 11510 
Engelhardt, Christian L.; (M) Engineer; 68 Pool Rd., North Haven, 

Conn. 06473 
Hauser, Louis C; (M) Medical Sales Manager; 1601 Powers Ave., 

East Meadow, New York 11554 
Cline, Eleanor; (M) Homemaker; 61 Lawton Ave., Hartsdale, N. Y. 
10530 



The United Methodist Church 63 

Patterson, Ruthetta A.; (M) Social Worker; 172-52 126th Ave., 

Springfield Gardens, N. Y. 11434 
Metzler, Ed. E., Ill; (M) IBM Systems Engineer; 9 Ronnie Lane, 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 12603 
Doyle, Christopher D.; (M) Conference Credit Manager; 59 Jog 

Hill Rd., Trumbull, Conn. 06611 

NORTH ALABAMA (16) SE 

Sec. A, Rows 7-8, Seats 1-8 

Kimbrough, R. Edwin; (2) (M) Minister; 518 N. 19th St., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 35203 
Montgomery, Allen D.; (7) (M) Minister; 1848 Tune Ave., Florence, 

Ala. 35630 
Clem, Paul L.; (3) (M) District Superintendent; 1801 N. Sixth 

Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 35203 
Morgan, Robert C; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 2826 Mont- 

clair Dr., Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35401 
Stevenson, Thomas F.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; Box 403, 

Roanoke, Alabama 36274 
Anderson, Barry H.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 8705 Camille 

Dr., S. E., Huntsville, Alabama 35802 
Franklin, DensonN.; (9) (M) Minister; 350 Overbrook Rd., Birming- 
ham, Alabama 35223 
Edgar, Thomas A.; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 709 S. Norton 

Ave., Sylacauga, Ala. 35150 
* Hundley, George R.; (12) (M) Interior Decorator; 402 Hughes Ave., 

Attalla Ala. 35954 
Gulp, Jesse A.; (5) (M) Editor & Publisher; 923 Brooklyn Ave., 

Albertville, Ala. 35950 
Montgomery, Edward; (4) (M) Woodworks Manufacturer; 2001 

First Ave., Tuscaloosa, Ala. 35401 
Lewis, W, Robert; (1) (M) Business Executive; 2415 Huntsville 

Rd., Florence, Ala. 35630 
Gordon, Mrs. John W.; (11) (M) Conf. Pres. WSCS; 108 Woodland 

Dr., Hueytown, Ala. 35020 
Purdy, Burt; (14) (M) Furniture Dealer; 1206 Sunset Blvd., Fort 

Payne, Ala. 35967 
Barnes, H. K.; (9) (M) Printer, Retired; 1442 John Wesley Circle, 

Birmingham, Ala. 35210 
Woodall, A. H.; (10) (M) Chemist; 1400 30th St., West, Birmingham, 

Ala. 35218 

Reserves 

Frederick, Charles L.; (M) District Superintendent; 1856 Tune Ave., 

Florence, Ala. 35630 
Goodwin, E. Bert, Jr.; (M) District Superintendent; Route 1, Gallant, 

Alabama 35972 
Hunter, J. Duncan; (M) Minister; 3 The Highlands, Tuscaloosa, 

Ala. 35401 
Whitehead, Claude W.; (M) Conf. Program Director; 2241 Great 

Rock Rd., Birmingham, Alabama 35216 
Rutland, John E.; (M) Minister; 8014 Hickory Lane, S. E,, Hunts- 
ville, Alabama 35802 
Elmore, S. Joe; (M) District Superintendent; 2108 Henry Rd., 

Anniston, Ala. 36201 
Curl, William E.; (M) Minister; 120 Green St., Huntsville, Ala. 

35801 
Lewis, Monroe C; (M) District Superintendent; 821 Sherman St., 

Decatur, Ala. 35601 



64 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Martin, Harold C; (M) District Superintendent; 1801 N. Sixth 
Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 35203 

Doyle, D. Paul; (M) Minister; 722 S. 56th St., Birmingham, Ala. 
35212 

Brannon, William C; (M) Insurance Executive; 608 Twin Branch 
Dr., Birmingham, Alabama 35226 

Dominick, Frank M.; (M) Attorney; 927 Brown-Marx Building, Bir- 
mingham, Alabama 35203 

Dawson, Roy K.; (M) Engineer; 5628 Ninth Ave. S., Birmingham, 
Ala. 35212 

Self, Edgar; (M) Public Accountant; P. 0. Box 1221, Decatur, Ala. 
35601 

Branscomb, Louise; (M) Physician; 944 S. 18th St., Birmingham, 
Ala. 35205 

Tanner, Ralph M.; (M) College Dean; Birmingham-Southern College, 
Birmingham, Alabama 35204 

Harris, W. M., Jr.; (M) Physician; 1921 Wellington Rd., Birming- 
ham, Ala. 35223 

Norton, Elbert B.; (M) University President; Florence State Univer- 
sity, Florence, Alabama 35630 

Phillips, J. Donald; (M) Professor; 10 Echo Hills, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
35401 

Yeilding, N. Manly, Jr.; (M) Attorney; 8 Montrose Circle, Birming- 
ham, Ala. 35213 

NORTH ARKANSAS (8) SC 

Sec. D, Rows 9-10, Seats 5-8 
*Cooper, Joel A.; (6) (M) Minister; 325 Highland, Fayetteville, 

Arkansas 72701 
Carter, Earl B.; (3) (M) Assoc. Dir. Program Council; 715 Center 

Street, Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 
Curtis, Myers B.; (2) (M) Minister; 120 Utah, North Little Rock, 

Ark. 72118 
McDonald, Charles P.; (7) (M) District Superintendent; 219 N. 

51st, Fort Smith, Ark. 72901 
Fulbright, Homer H.; (5) (M) Businessman; 712 N. Spring, Searcy, 

Ark. 72143 
Bumpers, E. Clay; (4) (M) Businessman; Wabash, Arkansas 72889 
Rainwater, Henry M.; (10) (M) Jeweler; 200 S. W. 2nd, Walnut 

Ridge, Ark. 72476 
Ellis, Matt L.; (1) (M) College Professor; 1208 Hunter, Conway, 

Ark. 72032 

Reserves 

Dodgen, Ethan W.; (M) District Superintendent; 428 Highland, 

Forrest City, Ark. 72335 
Jordan, Ben F.; (M) Minister; 940 Center, Conway, Ark. 72032 
Bayliss, John A.; (M) Minister; 1112 Adelaide, Fort Smith, Ark. 

72901 
Beal, Jim; (M) Minister; Porter & Pecan, Helena, Ark. 72342 
Johnson, Mrs. Howard; (M) Housewife; Clinton, Arkansas 72031 
McClinton, Clark C; (M) Building Contractor; 40 W. Prospect, 

Fayetteville, Ark. 72701 
Smith, Carlos J. R.; (M) Hospital Administrator; Stonebrook Rd., 

Helena, Ark. 72342 
Barnett, I. Nels; (M) Businessman; 1063 E. Maine, Batesville, Ark. 

72501 



The United Methodist Church 65 

NORTH CAROLINA (18) SE 

Sec. D, Rows 7-8, Seats 1-9 

Grant, Nicholas W.; (13) (M) Dir., Conf. Program Council; Rm. 

203, Methodist Building, 1307 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 27605 
Neese, William J.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 2201 Lynnwood 

Ave., Wilmington, N. C. 28401 
Mercer, Charles H.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 

2425, New Bern, N. C. 28560 
Early, Joyce V.; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 905 Spring Lane, 

Sanford, N. C. 27330 
Petteway, Warren B.; (9) (M) Minister; 1206 Branch St., Wilson, 

N. C. 27893 
Townsend, Samuel L.; (11) (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 1487, Laurin- 

burg, N. C. 28352 
Cushman, Robert E.; (6) (M) Professor, Duke; 2719 Spencer St., 

Durham, N. C. 27705 
Barclift, Chancie D.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 1002 W. 

Knox St., Durham, N. C. 27701 
Fisher, Albert F.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; 617 Banks 

Ave., Goldsboro, N. C. 27530 
*Mann, Mrs. Harold L.; (2) (M) Homemaker; 2219 Lee Ave., San- 
ford, N. C. 27330 
Anderson, Walter F.; (5) (M) Retired; 1124 Gunnison PL, Raleigh, 

N. C. 27609 
Gibson, J. Nelson; (7) (M) Businessman; P. O. Box 66, Gibson, 

N. C. 28343 
Patrick, James T.; (4) (M) Businessman; 1700 Avondale Dr., Dur- 
ham, N. C. 27701 
McAdams, Charles K.; (3) (M) Conf. Treasurer; 1307 Glenwood 

Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 27605 
Weaver, L. Stacy; (12) (M) College President; Methodist College, 

Fayetteville, N. C. 28301 
Dunn, Mrs. Sam A.; (14) (M) Homemaker; 109 N. Church St., 

Enfield, N. C. 27823 
King, Arnold K.; (10) (M) Univ. Vice President; University of 

North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 27514 
Garrick, Grier L.; (4) (M) Businessman; 624 New Bridge St., 

Jacksonville, N. C, 28540 

Reserves 

Carruth, Paul; (M) District Superintendent; 803 Sycamore St., 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 27801 
Cline, John M.; (M) Minister; 136 Hoke St., Burlington, N. C. 27215 
Gillespie Sylvester T.; (M) Minister; 1914 Stanberry St., Fayette- 
ville, N. C. 28301 
Watson, Harvey L.; (M) Minister; 506 Caswell St., Chapel Hill, 

N. C. 27514 
Quick, William K.; (M) Minister; 1108 W. Knox St., Durham, N. C. 

27701 
Seawell, William A., Sr.; (M) Minister; 1211 Fairfax Dr., Raleigh, 

N. C. 27609 
Page, Jack W.; (M) District Superintendent; 2234 Wheeler Rd., 

Raleigh, N. C. 27607 
Davidson, Barney L.; (M) Minister; 704 E. Walnut St., Goldsboro, 

N. C. 27530 
Ingram, Osmond K.; (M) Professor, Duke; 2728 Sevier St., Durham, 

N. C. 27705 
Hathaway, Offie L.; (M) Assoc. Dir., Program Council; P. 0. Box 

10644, Raleigh, N. C. 27605 



66 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Meares, John M.; (M) Adult Min. & Soc. Concerns; Room 218C, 
Meth. Bldg., 1307 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 27605 

Forehand, George H. ; (M) Businessman; 405 Trail 2, Burlington, 
N. C. 27215 

Jenkins, Leo W.; (M) University President; 605 E. 5th St., Green- 
ville, N. C. 27834 

Blair, J. Seaborn; (M) Medical Doctor; 400 N. Main St., Wallace, 
N. C. 28466 

Hargrove, Bruce; (M) Educator; 1115 Kitt PL, Raleigh, N. C. 27610 

Vereen, Mrs. LaFon C; (M) Homemaker; 1403 Market St., Wil- 
mington, N. C. 28401 

West, Cameron P.; (M) Educator; 3312 Mesa Court, Raleigh, N. C. 
27607 

Sanford, Terry; (M) University President; Duke University, Dur- 
ham, N. C. 27706 

Dial, Adolph R.; (M) College Professor; Route 1, Pembroke, N. C. 
28S72 

Hillman, Mrs. E. L.; (M) Homemaker; 2507 Woodrow St., Durham, 
N. C. 27705 

NORTH CHINA (2) OS 

No delegates elected 

NORTH DAKOTA (2) NC 

Sec. A, Row 14, Seats 11-12 
*Knecht, David F.; (5) (M) Minister; 1000 1st St., Bismark, N. D. 

58501 
Sundin, Robert; (4) (E) Farmer; Bowbells, N. D. 58721 

Reserves 

Neumann, Norman C; (E) District Superintendent; 1246 Oak St., 

Fargo, N. D. 58102 
Ewers, Duane A.; (M) Minister; 905 20th St., N. W., Minot, N. D. 

58701 
Young, Mrs. lola; (M) Conference Treasurer; 811 2nd Ave. S., Fargo, 

N. D. 58102 
Caine, Dr. Donald; (M) Optometrist; Box 967, Jamestown, N. D. 

58401 

NORTH GEORGIA (18) SE 

Sec. D, Row 3-4, Seats 2-10 
*Ruff, William H.; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 159 Forrest 

Ave., N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30303 
Myers, T. Cecil; (3) (M) Minister; Box 1109, Athens, Georgia 30601 
Jones, Bevel; (7) (M) Minister; Box 686, Decatur, Georgia 30031 
Thompson, Gordon G., Jr.; (9) (M) Professor; 1654 Noble Dr., N. E., 

Atlanta, Georgia 30306 
Prince, Frank H.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 435 Decatur 

Federal Bldg., Decatur, Georgia 30030 
Wilson, Charles E., Jr.; (3) (M) Minister; 111 W. Lake Dr., Athens, 

Georgia 30601 
Hagood, Delma L.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 3106 Trafalgar 

Dr., Augusta, Georgia 30904 
Drinkard, Eugene T.; (14) (M) Minister; 4720 Tall Pines Dr., N.W., 

Atlanta, Georgia 30327 
Moorhead, Frank; (6) (M) Minister; 56 Whitlock Ave., N. W., 

Marietta, Ga. 30060 



The United Methodist Church 67 

Brooks, David W.; (7) (M) Retired; Box 2210, Atlanta, Georgia 

30301 
Webb, Paul, Jr.; (2) (M) Attorney; 927 Fulton Federal Bldg., 

Atlanta, Ga. 30303 
McCommons, Mrs. R. M.; (13) (M) Housewife; 126 Pinecrest Dr., 

Greensboro, Ga. 30642 
Dekle, Joe B.; (4) (M) Program Council Staff; 159 Forrest Ave., 

N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30303 
Yeargan, Mrs. Victor; (1) (M) Housewife; 120 Westmore Rd., Rome, 

Ga. 30163 
Moore, Ray; (10) (M) TV Newscaster; 1551 Briarcliff Rd., N.E., 

Atlanta, Ga. 30306 
Sharpe, Guy; (12) (M) TV Newscaster; 1551 Briarcliff Rd., N.E., 

Atlanta, Ga. 30306 
Styron, Mrs. Arthur; (11) (M) Housewife; 262 Peachtree Hills 

Ave., N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30305 
MacKay, James; (8) (M) Attorney; 1032 Clifton Rd., N.E., Atlanta, 

Ga. 30307 

Reserves 

Taylor, Robert L.; (M) Minister; 1221 Clifton Rd., N.E., Atlanta, 

Georgia 30307 
Boleyn, Charles W.; (M) District Superintendent; 159 Forrest Ave., 

N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30303 
Thompson, James N.; (M) Minister; P. O. Box 752, Gainesville, Ga. 

30501 
Shelnutt, Dumas B.; (M) Minister; 521 E. College Ave., Griffin, Ga. 

30223 
Bi(dd, W. Candler; (M) Sec, Bd. of Pensions; 159 Forrest Ave., 

N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30303 
Padgett, Edgar A.; (M) District Superintendent; 801 Vernon St., 

La Grange, Ga. 30240 
Sherrill, Marion J.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 243, Rome, 

Georgia 30161 
Williams, Charles R.; (M) Director, Program Council; 159 Forrest 

Ave., N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 30303 
Whiting, Thoynas A.; (M) Minister; 670 Old Ivy Rd., N.E., Atlanta, 

Ga. 30305 
Boiven, William C; (M) District Superintendent; 2080 Campground 

Rd., S.W., Atlanta, Ga. 30331 
Noland, Robert J.; (M) Attorney; 115 Bowden St., Douglasville, Ga. 

30134 
King, Martha; (M) Teacher; 602y2 McCall Blvd., Rome, Ga. 30161 
Burgess, J. R.; (M) College President; Reinhardt College, Waleska, 

Ga. 30183 
Lance, Bert; (M) Banker; 409 E. Line St., Calhoun, Ga. 30701 
Harris, Frederick; (M) Cement Products; P. O. Box 550, Cartersville, 

Ga. 30120 
Tuck, Claude; (M) Clothing Store, Manager; 103 S. Broad St., 

Winder, Ga. 30680 
Gustafson, M. 0.; (M) Pres., Imp. Homes; 212 Larcom Ln., Griffin, 

Ga. 30223 
Eberhart, Tom; (M) Ex. Ser., U. of Ga.; 115 Edgewood Dr., Athens, 

Ga. 30601 
Pickett, Mrs, Elizabeth; (M) Housewife; 2000 W. Paces Ferry Rd., 

N.W., Atlanta, Georgia 30327 
Pittard, Joe; (M) Retired; 853 Northcliff Dr., N.W., Atlanta, Georgia 

30332 



68 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

NORTH INDIA (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 6, Seats 1-2 

Richards, Cecil T.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 94 Civil Lines, 

Bareilly, U. P., India 
Shaw, Inder A.; (12) (M) Doctor; Clara Swain Hospital, Civil Lines, 

Bareilly, U.P., India 

Reserves 

Singh, Joseph G.; (M) Minister; St. Paul's Church, Izatnagar, 

Bareilly, U.P., India 
Smart, Rosemund A.; (M) Government Service; 88 Civil Lines, 

Bareilly, U.P., India 

NORTH INDIANA (18) NC 
Sec. D, Rows 21-22-23, Seats 7-12 

*Colpitts, A. Hunter; (6) (E) District Superintendent; 326 E. Wayne 

St., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46802 
Bjork, Virgil V.; (6) (M) Minister; Box 967, Anderson, Indiana 

46015 
Geible, Merrell D.; (3) (E) Conference Staif; 1820 W. Main St., 

Muncie, Ind. 47303 
Carlson, Verner A.; (8) (E) District Superintendent; 629 Marleton 

Rd., Logansport, Indiana 46947 
Wolf, John D.; (1) (M) Minister; 7320 Northcote Ave., Hammond, 

Indiana 46324 
Jones, Gerald H.; (2) (M) Conference Director; 505 Roxbury Ct., 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 46807 
Keller, Alfred L.; (5) (E) Minister; 348 Rose Ellen Dr., Crown Point, 

Indiana 46307 
LaSuer, Donald F.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 305 E. 68th 

PL, Merrillville, Indiana 46410 
Fribley, Robert W.; Resigned 
Davis, George; (1) (E) School Superintendent; 166 W. Third, Peru, 

Indiana 46970 , , 

Sites, Mrs. Robert L.; (2) (E) Housewife; 4349 Lucinda Lane, 

Lafayette, Ind. 47905 
Helms, Mrs. Roy; (7) (M) Housewife; 1023 W. Taylor St., Kokomo, 

Ind. 46901 . _ 

Shown, Mrs. Louise; (11) (M) Housewife; 3334 St. Croix Dr., 

Fort Wayne, Indiana 46807 
Burrous, Kermit; (9) (M) Attorney; R. R. #3, Peru, Indiana 46970 
Heyde, Forest R.; (4) (E) Owner, Oil Company; E-31 Barrett Rd., 

Rochester, Ind. 46975 ^, , ^ , 

Robbins, Gene E.; (12) (M) Attorney; 1558 Rossville Ave., Frank- 
fort, Indiana 46041 X, ^o T. T J- 
Burrous, Mrs. Anita; (7) (M) Housewife; R. R. #3, Peru, Indiana 

46970 
Colpitts, Mrs. A. Hunter; (14) (E) Housewife; 1236 St. Joe River 

Dr., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46805 

Reserves 

McMahan, Donald F.; (10) (M) District Superintendent; 19050 

Orchard Hgts. Dr., South Bend, Indiana 46614 
Katayama, Roy; (M) Minister; 428 Second St., Chesterton, Ind. 46304 
Duecker, R. Sheldon; (M) Minister; 2501 S. Harrison St., Ft. Wayne, 

Indiana 46807 , , x j a^^aa 

Dicken, John; (M) Minister; 211 S. Beiger, Mishawaka, Ind. 46544 



The United Methodist Church 69 

Bergwall, Evan H., Sr.; (M) District Superintendent; 1721 Meado- 

wood Dr., Elkhart, Ind. 46514 
Hook, James S.; (E) Minister; 1232 Crescent Ave., Fort Wayne, 

Indiana 46805 
Kistler, Richard; (E) Minister; 1415 N. Michigan St., Elkhart, 

Indiana 46514 
Steele, Ralph S.; (M) Minister; 6635 Hohman Ave., Hammond, Ind. 

46324 
Williams, J. C; (M) Minister; 1112 S. Hackley St., Muncie, Ind. 

47302 
Barnes, Donald L.; (M) Minister; 321 N. Webster, Kokomo, Ind. 

46901 
Chambers, Marshall; (E) Public Relations; 1525 Windermire, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 46227 
Walker, Clarence; (M) Retired, U.S. Steel; 729 E. 14th Ave., Gary, 

Ind. 46407 
Fenstermacher, Mrs. Robert; (M) Housewife; 203 Clarke Rd., 

Walkerton, Ind. 46574 
Hefley, Charles E.; (M) Principal, Jr. High; 910 Euclid Ave., Marion, 

Ind. 46952 
Anglin, James F.; (E) Corp. President; 2704 Glencairn Dr., Ft. 

Wayne, Ind, 46805 
Kaiser, Samuel M.; (M) Manufacturer; 1858 Dean St., Huntington, 

Indiana 46750 
Morlan, Darrell E.; (M) Controller; 1803 W. Wallen Rd., Ft. Wayne, 

Indiana 46808 
Case, Riley L.; (M) Retired; 711 Hawpatch, LaGrange Ind. 46761 
Roudebush, Roy R.; (M) Retired; 1518 Nichol Ave., Anderson, Ind. 

46011 
Roelke, Mrs. Paul L.; (E) Housewife; 18165 Southern View Dr., 

South Bend, Indiana 46614 
Bergwall, Mrs. Evan H., Sr.; (M) Housewife; 1721 Meadowood Dr., 

Elkhart, Ind. 46514 
Hauptman, Leo; (M) Retired; 2025 W. Jackson, Muncie, Ind. 47303 

NORTH KATANGA (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 11, Seats 7-8 
*Ngoi, Maurice; (3) (M) Minister; B. P. 95, Kamina, Republique 

Democratique du Congo 
Werder, Louise; (4) (M) Principal; B. P. 62, Kamina, Republique 

Democratique du Congo 

Reserves 

Mwambai, Leon; (M) Minister; B. P. 522, Lubumbashi, Republique 

Democratique du Congo 
Makonga, Arnold; (M) Principal; B. P. 95, Kamina, Republique 

Democratique du Congo 

NORTH MISSISSIPPI (8) SE 

Sec. A, Rows 15-16, Seats 5-8 

^Houston, Jamie G.; (13) (M) Minister; Box 100, Kosciusko, Missis- 
sippi 39090 

Bailey, E. A.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; Box 929, Cleveland, 
Mississippi 38732 

Humphrey, John D., Sr.; (3) (M) Staff, General Bd. of Ed.; Box 
871, Nashville, Tenn. 37202 

Wallace, William L., Jr.; (6) (M) Minister; Box 230, Cleveland, 
Mississippi 38732 



70 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Egger, Kirk; (7) (M) Wholesale Grocer; Box 1018, Columbus, Mis- 
sissippi 39701 

Fant, Glenn; (2) (M) Attorney; Box 66, Holly Springs, Mississippi 
38G35 

Yarbrough, George M.; (1) (M) Editor &. Publisher; Red Banks, 
Mississippi 38661 

Bailey, Joe N., Jr.; (4) (M) Farmer & Merchant; Box 257, CoflFee- 
ville, Mississippi 38922 

Reserves 

Meadows, Archie L.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 552, Stark- 
ville, Mississippi 39759 

Gordon, Prentiss, Sr.; (M) Minister; Drawer 728, Starkville, Mis- 
sissippi 39759 

Bishop, Andie C; (M) Minister; Box 603, Clarksdale, Mississippi 
38614 

McCool, David; (M) Public Accountant; Box 147, Louisville, Mis- 
sissippi 39339 

Sharp, William L.; (M) Attorney; P. 0. Box 844, Corinth, Mis- 
sissippi 38834 

Perry, Bob G.; (M) State Senator; Box 121, Horn Lake, Mississippi 
38637 

NORTH TEXAS (12) SC 
Sec. C, Rows 16-17, Seats 1-6 

*Trice, William E.; (6) (M) Minister; P. O. Box 12038, Dallas, 

Tx. 75225 
Outler, Albert C; (1) (M) Theologian, Perkins; 6019 Lakehurst, 

Dallas Tx 75230 
Holmes, 'Zan W., Jr.; (3) (M) District Superintendent; P. O. Box 

7170, Dallas, Tx. 75209 
Goodrich, Robert E., Jr.; (9) (M) Minister; 1928 Ross Ave., Dallas, 

Tx. 75201 
Gathings, Ervin M.; (14) (M) District Superintendent; Jefferson 

Towers, Suite 501, Dallas, Texas 75208 
Casad, Gordon D.; (10) (M) District Superintendent; P. O. Box 

8124, Dallas, Tx. 75205 
Baker, Leo L.; (4) (M) Engineer; 5624 Daniels, Dallas, Tx. 75230 
Greenhaw, Frank; (13) (M) Merchant; 425 S. Galloway, Mesquite, 

Tx. 75149 
Fisher, J. Herschel; (5) (M) Architect; 1630 Nob Hill, Dallas, Tx. 

75208 
Mays, Avery; (7) (M) Building Contractor; 950 Kessler Way, Dallas 

Tx. 75208 
Roper, Wilbur F.; (11) (M) Research Chemist; 811 Green Hills, 

Dallas Texas 75232 
Watson, 'Martha B.; (2) (M) Registered Nurse; 1511 Kendolph, 

Denton, Texas 76201 

Reserves 

Hares, James; (M) Dir., Conf. Prog. Agencies; Box 8386, Dallas, 

Texas 75205 
Underwood, Walter L.; (M) Minister; Box 2125, Wichita Falls, 

Tx. 76307 
Shipp, Thomas J.; (M) Minister; 5002 W. Lovers Ln., Dallas, Tx. 

75209 
Weaver, R. Bruce; (M) Minister; 1215 Turner, Dallas, Texas 75208 
Mooring, J. D.; (M) Minister; 3731 Myrtle, Dallas, Texas 75215 
Stephenson, William T.; (M) Minister; 11076 Swaffar Dr., Dallas, 

Tx. 75228 



The United Methodist Church 71 

Williams, Raymond; (M) Postal Clerk; 1246 Whispering Tr., Dallas, 

Tx. 75241 
Ransom, E. C; (M) Insurance Agent; 3514 Packard, Dallas, Tx 

75215 
Braswell, Henry; (M) Judge; 3555 Audubon Rd., Paris, Tx. 75460 
Tanner, Mrs. Guy; (M) Housewife; 1538 Mesquite, Wichita Falls, 

Tx. 76302 
Gilreath, Mrs, Judy; (M) Housewife; Box 203, Sulphur Springs, 

Tx. 75482 
Boswell, George; (M) Orthopedic Surgeon; 7249 Wabash, Dallas, 

Tx. 75214 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS (18) NC 
Sec. D, Rows 15-16, Seats 1-9 

-North felt, Merlyn W.; (6) (M) President, Garrett Theological Sem.; 

2121 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, 111. 60201 
Jarvis, Charles S.; (2) (M) Minister; 1903 E. Euclid St., Arlington 

Heights, 111. 60004 
Clay, Willie B.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 77 W. Washington, 

Suite 1806, Chicago, 111. 60602 
Tholin, Richard D.; (1) (E) Professor; 15 N. Columbia Ave., 

Naperville, 111. 60540 
Amnions, Edsel A.; (1) (M) Professor; 2121 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, 

111. 60201 
White, William D.; (13) (M) Program Coordinator; 77 W. Wash- 
ington, Suite 1806, Chicago, 111. 60602 
Batt, Samuel; (5) (E) Minister; 115 W. Lincoln, Barrington, 111. 

60010 
Rogers, Carleton C; (10) (M) Minister; 216 E. Highland, Elgin, 

111. 60120 
Stauffer, Eugene E.; (12) (M) Minister; 100 W. Cossitt Ave., 

LaGrange, 111. 60525 
Gates, Merrill; (3) (E) School Administrator; 26 W. 255 Maple, 

Naperville, 111. 60540 
Lennartson, Walter; (4) (M) Retired; 5624 W. 100th St., Oak Lawn, 

111. 60453 
Van Sickle, John R.; (9) (M) Newspaper Publisher; 1904 Crenshaw 

St., Rockford, 111. 61107 
Pfeiffer, Mrs. A. B.; (11) (M) Homemaker; 523 Kingsway Dr., 

Aurora, 111. 60505 
Wieting, Mrs. Wesley S.; (7) (M) Conf. President WSCS; 600 

Lyman Ave., Oak Park, 111. 60304 
Oehler, Mrs. Jack; (14) (E) Homemaker; 1003 Augusta, Elgin, 

111. 60120 
Johnson, Joseph T.; (3) (M) Funeral Director; 462 W. Division St., 

Chicago, 111. 60610 
Walton, Herbert; (8) (M) Retired; 2400 Talcott, Apt. 322, Park 

Ridge, 111. 60068 
Cummings, Mrs. C. C; (7) (M) Homemaker; Lakeview Apts., 92 

Pauline Dr., Elgin, 111. 60120 

Reserves 

Clymer, Wayne K.; (E) President, Evangelical Theological Sem.; 

209 N. Brainard, Naperville, 111. 60540 
Mettling, Carl G.; (M) District Superintendent; 77 W. Washington, 

Chicago, 111. 60602 
Wykle, Eugene M.; (E) District Superintendent; 112 George Ln., 

Naperville, 111. 60540 



72 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Pembroke, Maceo D.; (M) Minister; 8441 St. Lawrence, Chicago, 

111. 60619 
Ferguson, John C; (M) Minister; 7350 S. Jeffrey, Chicago, 111. 60649 
Flores, Finees; (M) Minister; 912 Sheridan Rd., Chicago, 111. 60613 
Benson, Hotvard C; (M) District Superintendent; 582 McLean Blvd., 

Elgin, 111. 60120 
Whittle, Paul O.; (M) District Superintendent; 77 W. Washington, 

Chicago. 111. 60602 
Jordan, Charles W.; (M) Urban Work; 101 Chesnut, Rockford, 111. 

61101 
Kirkpatrick, Dow; (M) Minister; 1630 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 111. 

60201 
Riskedal, R. Kenneth; (M) Farmer; Rt. 1, Leland, 111. 60531 
Fannings, Mrs. Helen; (M) Social Worker; 7800 Merrill, Chicago, 

111. 60649 
Steele, Clay; (M) Retired; 595 Duane, Glen Ellyn, 111. 60137 
Kinsey, Mrs. A. M.; (M) Homemaker; 275 N, Country Club Dr., 

Addison, 111. 60101 
Zimmerman, Paul; (E) 444 S. Julian, Naperville, 111. 60540 
McFarland, Mrs. R. J.; (M) 500 E. 33rd, Chicago, 111. 60619 
Laskey, W. Jennings; (M) Retired; 422 Davis, Evanston, 111. 60201 
Agler, Mrs. L. M.; (M) 1016 Arlington, LaGrange, 111. 60525 
Huntington, Mrs. Earle; (M) Homemaker; 2210 Taylor, Joliet, 111. 

60433 
Farley, Mrs. Paul; (E) 301 W. Center, Itasca, 111. 60143 

NORTHERN NEW JERSEY (8) NE 

Sec. A, Rows 3-4, Seats 7-10 

*Ault, James M.; (6) (M) Seminary Dean; 8 Campus Drive, 

Madison, N. J. 07940 
Lanning, Dean A.; (3) (M) Minister; 99 Parish Dr., Wayne, N. J. 

07470 
Smith, Eugene L.; (2) (M) Exec. Sec'y, New York Office, W.C.C; 

157 Alpine Dr., Closter, N. J. 07624 
Stephens, Ralph L.; (7) (M) Director, Urban Ministries; 103 N. 

Walnut St., East Orange, N. J. 07017 
Black, Clair W. (Mr.) ; (4) (M) Educator; 328 Colonial Blvd., West- 
wood, N. J. 07675 
Holland, Betty Lou (Mrs.) ; (1) (M) Housewife; 11 Elm St., Newton, 

N. J. 07860 
Howe, Clarice (Mrs.); (5) (M) Housewife; 150 Clinton Ave., North 

Plainfield, N. J. 07063 
Rollins, Rose (Mrs.); (13) (M) Housewife; 803 S. 10th St., Newark, 

N.J. 07112 

Reserves 

Goodwin, Robert B.; (M) Minister; 22 Madison Ave., Madison, N. J. 
07940 

Watt, George, Jr.; (M) Minister; 110 Union St., Ridgewood, N. J. 
07450 

Gra7it, Robert E.; (M) Minister; 379 15th Ave., Paterson, N. J. 07504 

Rodda, William F. B.; (M) Minister; 12 Roosevelt Rd., Maplewood, 
N. J. 07040 

Stockwell, Eugene L.; (M) Assistant General Secretary, World Di- 
vision, Bd. of Missions; 197 Union St., Ridgewood, N. J. 07450 

Kokolias, Dorothy (Mrs.) ; (E) Newspaper Reporter; Kokolias Lane, 
Matamoras, Pa. 18336 

Ewing, Miss Betsy K. ; (M) Assoc. General Sect'y, Board of Missions; 
1 Wall St., Apt. 3 A, Fort Lee, N. J. 07024 



The United Methodist Church 73 

Ostertag, Frank, Sr.; (M) Administrator; 277 Clark St., Hillside, 

N. J. 07205 
Galbraith, Mrs. John A.; (M) Secretary; 329 Hickory St., Teaneck, 

N.J. 07666 
Burkett, Newton, Jr.; (M) Banker; 153 Chilton St., Elizabeth, N. J. 

07208 

NORTHERN NEW YORK (4) NE 

Sec. A, Row 6, Seats 3-6 

Van Ornum, Carlton G.; (6) (M) District Supt.; 43 Proctor Blvd., 

Utica, N. Y. 13501 
Wood, Allison C; (13) (M) Minister; 187 Main St., Massena, N. Y. 

13662 
Schoenlein, Dr. Charles F.; (4) (M) Dentist; Richfield Springs, 

New York 13439 
Lee, Vernon; (3) (M) Ret. School Principal; 804 Hickory St., Rome, 

N. Y. 13440 

Reserves 

Oot, Arthur B., Jr.; (M) Conf. Program Dir.; 418 Washington St., 

Watertown, N. Y. 13601 
Hart, William G.; (M) Minister; 43 Court St., Canton, N. Y. 13617 
Dice, Howard; (M) Production Mgr.; R.F.D, #3, Oswego, N. Y. 

13126 
Williams, Mrs. Charles S.; (M) Housewife; 68 Morgan St., Illon, 

N. Y. 13357 

NORTHERN PHILIPPINES (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 11, Seats 4-5 

*Addiiro, Pablo M.; (1) (M) Minister; United Methodist Church, 

Ilagan, Isabela, Philippines 
Fabian, Pedro F.; (4) (M) Bank Manager; P. N. B. Branch, Aparri, 

Cagayan-A-305, Philippines 

Reserves 

Ibasco, Abelardo 0.; (M) Minister; United Methodist Church, Solano, 
Nueva Vizcaya, Philippines 

Jimenez, Bienenido J.; (M) Lawyer; Aparri, Cagayan-A-305, Phil- 
ippines 

NORTHWEST GERMANY (4) OS 

Sec. A, Row 7, Seats 9-12 
*Baass, Erich M.; (12) (M) District Superintendent; 2000 Hamburg 

20, Abendrothsweg 43, Germany 
Harriefeld, Fritz; (11) (E) District Superintendent; 43 Essen, 

Menzelstrasse 20, Germany 
Kuehl, Werner E.; (11) (M) Official; 315 Peine, Weidenweg 5, 

Germany 
Westphal, Wilhelm F.; (3) (E) Businessman; 3001 Isernhagen FB, 

Im Heisterholz 11, Germany 

Reserves 
Lein, Woldemar; (M) Minister; 2000 Hamburg 26, Carl-Petersen- 

Str. 59, Germany , . , ^ , • . 

Mohrmann, Werner; (E) Minister; 563 Remscheid, Ludwigstr. 6, 

Germany 



74 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Lovasz, Johannes K. ; (M) Conf. Youth Secretary; 2 Hamburg 22, 

Dehnhaide 3, Germany 
Schalla, Reinhard A.; (E) Techn. Clerk; 33 Braunschweig, Fritz- 

Giesel-Strasse 15, Germany 

NORTHWEST PHILIPPINES (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 12, Seats 6-7 

Vinluan, Victor C; (6) (M) Dist. Supt.; 27 Alvear St., Lingayen, 

Pangasinan, Philippines 
*Samson, Restitute F.; (4) (M) Business Man; 105 Quezon Hill 

Rd., Baguio City, Philippines 

Reserves 

Bailen, Gregorio R.; (M) Minister; Paniqui, Tarlac, Philippines 
Sansano, Lauro 0.; (M) Lawyer; Guimba, Nueva Ecija, Philippines 
Gacutan, Ezekias G.; (M) 1732 J. Bacobo St., Manila, Philippines 

NORTHWEST TEXAS (8) SC 

Sec. A, Rows 15-16, Seats 9-12 

*Boyd, Marvin L.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 3005 23rd St., 

Lubbock, Texas 79410 
Bruce, S. Duane; (2) (M) Conf. Prog. Director; Box 2958, Lubbock, 

Texas 79408 
Lutrick, Charles E.; (13) (M) Pastor; 1501 University, Lubbock, 

Texas 79401 
Dotts, Ted J.; (14) (M) District Superintendent; 2014 N. Russell, 

Pampa, Texas 79065 
Ledbetter, M. C; (4) (M) District Judge; Box 735, Morton, Texas 

79346 
Matthews, Mrs. Cecil R. ; (7) (M) Pres., Conf. WSCS; 2614 3rd 

Ave., Canyon, Texas 79015 
Kim, Thomas K.; (3) (M) College President; McMurry College, 

Abilene, Texas 79605 
Harriger, Harold O.; (1) (M) Attorney; Drawer 10302, Lubbock, 

Texas 74908 

Reserves 

Grooms, Jordon; (M) District Superintendent; 623 Tulane, Big 

Spring, Texas 79720 
Trotter, Clifford E.; (M) District Superintendent; 1401 Polk St., 

Amarillo, Texas 79101 
Butler, J. Weldon; (M) District Superintendent; 1410 Amarillo St., 

Plainveiw, Texas 79072 
Egger, Darris L.; (M) District Superintendent; 1909 River Oaks Rd., 

Abilene, Texas 79605 
McBrayer, O. A.; (M) Pastor; 3007 33rd St., Lubbock, Texas 79410 
Appling, W.A.; (M) Pastor; Box 527, Hereford, Texas 79045 
Langley, Earnest; (M) Attorney; Box 1818, Hereford, Texas 79045 
Tooley, Wendell; (M) Editor; Box 700, Floydada, Texas 79235 
Willson, J. M., Jr; (M) Lumber Dealer; Box 666, Floydada, Texas 

79235 
Salem, Joe T.; (M) Investments; Box 218, Sudan, Texas 79371 
Baumgardner, Robert; (M) Farmer; 1007 E. Peppto, Brownfield, 

Texas 79316 
DeflFebach, Lyle L.; (M) Public Accountant; Box 920, Snyder, Texas 

79549 



The United Methodist Church 75 

NORWAY (2) OS 
Sec. C, Row 9, Seats 10-11 

Madsen, Arnold; (5) (M) District Superintendent; St. Olavsgt. 28, 
Oslo, Norway 

*Gausdal, Hans; (4) (M) Astrids vei 11, 4600 Kristiansand S Nor- 
way 

Reserves 

Soiland, Gustav; (M) Minister; Olavsgt. 6, 3900 Porsgrunn, Norway 
Master, Rolf; (M) Minister; Thv. Meyersgt. 56, Oslo 5, Norway 
Gulliksen, Erling; (M) Liavegen 33, 1600 Fredrikstad, Norway 

OKLAHOMA (20) SC 

Sec. B, Rows 3-4, Seats 1-10 

Crutchfield, Finis A.; (6) (M) Minister; 1301 S. Boston Ave., Tulsa, 

Oklahoma 74119 
Fenn, G. Lemuel; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 1901 Mocking- 
bird Lane, Enid, Oklahoma 73701 
Henry, William R.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 624 Harned 

PI., Stillwater, Oklahoma 74074 
Lovern, J. Chess; (7) (M) Minister, 323 N. W. 16th, Oklahoma City, 

Oklahoma 73103 
Peters, Lloyd A.; (3) (M) Minister; 7th and Duck, Stillwater, Okla. 

74074 
S7nith, Irving L.; (14) (M) District Superintendent; 3133 N. W. 19th, 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73107 
Sprouls, J. Clifton; (2) (M) District Superintendent; Box 1757, 

Muskogee, Oklahoma 74401 
Coffin, Wayne W.; (6) (M) Minister; Box 2067, Norman, Oklahoma 

73069 
Kay, W. Eugene; (10) (E) Minister; Box 385, Mooreland, Oklahoma 

73852 
Featherston, R. Jack; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 1722 Essex, 

Ardmore, Oklahoma 73401 
*Doenges, William C; (4) (M) Rancher & Automobile Dealer; 

Drawer "Z", Bartlesville, Okla. 74004 
Egan, Jim A.; (1) (M) Investment Banking; 219 North 11th, Musko- 
gee, Okla. 74401 
Page, S. Covey; (5) (M) Terminal Manager; 5344 E. 21st, Tulsa, 

Okla. 74114 
Silvers, Mrs. Floyd L.; (11) (M) Pres. Conf. WSCS; 1228 S. Quebec, 

Tulsa, Okla. 74112 
Whitten, Dolphus, Jr.; (9) (M) University President; 2501 N. Black- 
welder, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73106 
Metzel, Mrs. George V.; (7) (M) Homemaker; 1925 S. Florence, 

Tulsa, Okla. 74104 
Price, Robert R.; (3) (M) Professor; 601 Hartwood Ave., Stillwater, 

Okla. 74074 
Moore, Manly M.; (8) (M) Builder; 910 E. Lockheed, Midwest City, 

Okla. 73110 
Codding, Charles, Jr.; (9) (M) Rancher; Foraker, Oklahoma 74638 
Gilbert, Ronald W.; (12) (M) Dentist; 304 "B" Street N. W., Miami, 

Okla. 74354 

Reserves 

Teeter, Bonner E.; (M) Minister; 143 Park View, Ponca City, Okla. 
74601 



76 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Meyer, Lester A.; (M) Dir. Conf. Program Council; 706 Cravens 

Bldg., Oklahoma City, Okla. 73102 
Grahajn, George G.; (M) District Superintendent; 1628 N. 32nd, 

Lawton, Okla. 73501 
Dorff, Earl N.; (M) District Superintendent; 3707 E. 47th Place, 

Tulsa, Okla. 74135 
Miller, W. Jene; (M) Minister; 3034 N.W. 17th, Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 73107 
Thurston, Elwyn O.; (M) Minister; Box 507, Lawton, Oklahoma 

73501 
Plowman, Howard L.; (M) Minister; 5603 S. New Haven, Tulsa, 

Okla. 74135 
Russell, John W.; (M) Minister; 401 W. Randolph, Enid, Okla. 73701 
Oden, William B.; (M) Minister; 820 McGee Dr., Norman, Okla. 

73069 
Wells, Charles E.; (M) Minister; 2600 N. May Ave., Oklahoma City, 

Oklahoma 73107 
Hicks, L. T.; (E) Salesman; R. R. 1, Bixby, Oklahoma 74008 
Felts, Clay W.; (M) Merchant; Box 420, Tahlequah, Oklahoma 74464 
McFall, Carl S.; (M) Life Insurance Agent; Box 13, Frederick, 

Oklahoma 73542 
Fossett, Warren J.; (M) Funeral Director; 701 W. Maine, Enid, 

Oklahoma 73701 
Oden, Waldo T., Jr.; (M) Attorney; P. O. Drawer "J", Altus, Okla, 

73521 
Finney, W. Wray; (M) Cattle Ranching; Box 280, Fort Cobb, Okla. 

73038 
Barrett, Samuel M.; (M) Dentist; 205 N. Noble, Watonga, Okla. 

73772 
Pettijohn, Rex E.; (M) Postmaster; Box 361, Stigler, Oklahoma 74462 
Carle, John R.; (M) Attorney; Box 326, Claremore, Oklahoma 74017 
Whitten, Mrs. Dolphus, Jr.; (M) Housewife; 2321 N. W. 25th, Okla- 
homa City, Oklahoma 73107 

OREGON-IDAHO (6) W 

Sec. C, Rows 11-12, Seats 1-3 

*Burtner, Robert W.; (11) (M) Minister; 5830 N. E. Alameda, Port- 
land, Or. 97213 

Jenkins, H. James; (2) (M) Minister; 237 N. Water, Idaho Falls, Id. 
83401 

Albertson, C. Gene; (6) (M) Minister; Box 2327, Salem, Oregon 
97308 

Schwiebert, Erwin H.; (1) (M) Asst. Pres. College; 2904 College, 
Caldwell, Id. 83605 

Watson, Mrs. Elizabeth; (7) (M) Homemaker; 3325 N. E. 29th, Port- 
land, Or. 97212 

Rose, Harold E.; (4) (M) Research Metallurgist; 5404 N. Montana, 
Portland, Or. 97217 

Reserves 

Walker, William O.; (M) Minister, 1165 N. W. Monroe, Corvallis, 

Or. 97330 
Peters, Robert N.; (M) Minister; 1236 Kincaid, Eugene, Or. 97401 
Balcomb, Raymond E.; (M) Minister; 1838 S. W. Jeflferson, Portland, 

Oregon 97201 
Haines, Henry L.; (M) District Superintendent; 10 N. W. 10th Ave., 

Portland, Oregon 97209 
Cox, Ralph E.; (E) Office Manager; 18615 S. W. Wilmotte, Portland, 

Oregon 97222 



The United Methodist Church 77 

Blair, Mrs. Douglas; (M) Homemaker; 347 Craven, Monmouth, Or. 

97361 
Reed, Watford; (M) Staff writer, Oregon Journal; 5250 S. E. Ivon, 

Portland, Or. 97206 
Uppinghouse, Mrs. Leonard; (M) Secretary; 9684 N. W. Cornell, 

Portland, Or. 97229 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST (10) W 

Sec. A, Rows 11-12, Seats 8-12 

''Tuell, Jack M.; (6) (M) Minister; 401 E. 33rd St., Vancouver, Wa. 
98663 

Finkbeiner, Melvin M.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; 804 Olym- 
pic Nat'l Bldg., Seattle, Wa. 98104 

Harding, Joe A.; (14) (M) Minister; 1124 Stevens Dr., Richland, Wa. 
99352 

Beeman, Paul J.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 410 Sherwood 
Bldg., Spokane, Wa. 99201 

Poor, George L.; (5) (M) Minister; 3118 S. 140th St., Seattle, Wa. 
98168 

Eby, Mrs. Norma; (7) (M) Homemaker; 10805 S. E. 320th, Auburn, 
Wa. 98002 

Dolliver, James; (1) (M) Gov't Administration; 312 N. Sherman, 
Olympia, Wa. 98501 

Hjelte, Marshall C; (10) (M) Administrator; Wesley Gardens-Ter- 
race, Des Moines, Washington 98188 

Praetorius, Herman R.; (4) (E) Orchardist; Rt. 1, Box 340, Tieton, 
Wa. 98947 

Little, Mrs. Alvirita; (3) (M) Med. Administrator; 2325 S. Graham 
St., Seattle, Wa. 98108 

Reserves 

Ritchey, William H.; (M) Minister; 14 N. 48th Ave., Yakima, Wa. 
98902 

Brown, Frank E.; (M) Minister; 828 Caspers St., Edmonds, Wa. 
98020 

Ellington, William D.; (M) Minister; 18515 92nd Ave., N. E., Bothell, 
Wa. 98011 

Tuttle, G. Richard; (M) Minister; 3520 Colby Ave., Everett, Wa. 
98201 

Parker, Bruce G.; (M) Minister; 4710 N. E. 70th, Seattle, Wa. 98115 

Summerour, William F.; (M) District Superintendent; Rm. 206, 
Denny Bldg., Walla Walla, Washington 99362 

Ikeda, Tsuguo; (M) Social Work Administration; 2103 S. Atlantic, 
Seattle, Wa. 98118 

Stevens, Robert W.; (M) Conference Treasurer; 810 Olympic Nat'l 
Bldg., Seattle, Washington 98104 

Zellmer, Willard; (M) Attorney; Rt 3, Davenport, Washington 
99122 

Wyckoff, Mrs. Aloha; (M) Homemaker; 6735 35th Ave., N. W., Seat- 
tle, Wa. 98107 

Holte, Alfred O.; (M) Attorney, Judge; 1031 C St., Edmonds, Wash- 
ington 98020 

Pritchard, Llewelyn G.; (M) Attorney; 5229 140th N. E., Bellevue, 
Washington 98004 

PENINSULA (8) NE 

Sec. D, Rows 9-10, Seats 1-4 
*Cooke, R. Jervis; (7) (M) Conf. Program Director; 217 N. Bradford 
St., Dover, Delaware 19901 



78 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Cuff, G. Wayne; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 431 N. State St., 
Dover, Delaware 19901 

McCoy, Paul E.; (6) (M) Minister; 1704 Bancroft Parkway, Wil- 
mington, Delaware 19806 

Breiver, Otho G., Jr.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 215 S. Han- 
son St., Easton, Md. 21601 

Chapman, Dr. A. Frank; (12) (M) DuPont Co. Executive; 2417 
Brookshire Dr., Chatham, Wilmington, Delaware 19803 

Mangum, Mrs. Orien; (11) (M) President Conf. WSCS; 2407 Mat- 
wood Rd. N. Graylyn Crest, Wilmington, Delaware 19803 

Hardcastle, James C; (3) (M) School Administrator; 121 N. Kirk- 
wood St., Dover, Delaware 19901 

Hancock, Maurice M.; (4) (M) Insurance Business; 215 Oakdale 
Rd., Salisbury, Md. 21801 

Reserves 

Wilkins, Howell O.; (M) District Superintendent; 1213 Delaware, 

Wilmington, Del. 19808 
Shockley, John R.; (M) Minister; 623 N. Harrison St., Wilmington, 

Del. 19805 
Hemphill, William, Jr.; (M) Minister; 4 Malvern Court, Devon, 

Wilmin^on, Delaware 19803 
Ruth, Dale L.; (M) District Superintendent; 1404 Camden Ave., 

Ext'd, Salisbury, Md. 21801 
May, Felton E.; (M) Minister; 4303 Whittier Dr., Brandywine Hills, 

Wilmington, Delaware 19802 
Mackey, J. Robert; (M) Minister; 410 Country Club Dr., Wilmington, 

Delaware 19803 
Henry, Mrs. William A.; (M) 1007 Popular St., Wilmington, Dela- 
ware 19800 
Boss, Leroy; (M) Dover Electric Co.; 438 West St., Dover, Delaware 

19901 
Weber, Benjamin; (M) 134 Wesley St., Elkton, Md. 21921 
Alford, Mrs. Thelma; (M) Housewife; Box 310, Oxford, Maryland 

21654 
Selby, Mrs. Cora; (M) Teacher; R.D. 2, Box 34, Laurel, Delaware 

19956 
Appleby, Harvey; (M) Box 135, Bear, Delaware 19701 

PHILIPPINES (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 6, Seats 11-12 

*Bautista, Ignacio P.; (7) (M) Dist. Supt,; #55 Guevara, Sn. Fran- 
cisco del Monte, Q.C. 503, Philippines 

Mendigorin, Abdon; (12) (M) Lawyer; #14 Botolan, Quezon City, 
R. P. 501, Philippines 

Reserves 

Cortes, Nathanael L.; (M) Minister; 943 Aurora Blvd. Q.C.,R.P. 501, 

Philippines 
Bernardo, Teodoro; (M) Lawyer; #125 Int. Ignacio St., Pasay City, 

R.P. 720, Philippines 

POLAND (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 4, Seats 11-12 
*Benedyktowicz, Witold; (14) (M) General Superintendent; Moko- 

towska 12 M 10-a, Warsaw, Poland 
Kleszczynski, Adam; (3) (M) Teacher; ul. Piotra skargi 1, Konstan- 

cin near Warsaw, p-ta Jeziorna, Poland 



The United Methodist Church 79 

Reserves 

Kuczma, Adam; (M) Vice Superintendent; Mokotowska 12m 10, War- 
saw, Poland 

Kuczma, Lidia; (M) Secretary; Mokotowska 12 m 10, Warsaw, Po- 
land 

PUERTO RICO (2) NE 

Sec. B, Row 13, Seats 10-11 

*Santana, Benjamin; (12) (M) Pastor; Bracetti #8, Rio Piedras, 

P.R. 
Cabrera, Ismael; (4) (M) Businessman; G. P. 0. Box 1152, San Juan, 

P.R. 00930 

Reserves 

None 

RHODESIA (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 17, Seats 10-11 

Delegates 

Kadenge, Fannuel; (M) (13) Minister; Mutambara Mission, P. 0. 

Mutambara, Rhodesia 
Marima, William; (M) (4) Boarding Director; P.B. P7024, Umtali, 

Rhodesia 

Reserves 

Munjoyna, Samuel; (M) Minister; Old Umtali Mission, P.B. P7024, 

Umtali, Rhodesia 
Dangarembga, Susan; (M) Teacher; P.B. P7024, Umtali, Rhodesia 

RIO GRANDE (2) SC 

Sec. C, Rows 9-10, Seats 12 
*Barton, Roy D.; (7) (M) Conf. Program Director; P. 0. Box 28098, 

San Antonio, Texas 78284 
Avifia, Mike; (2) (M) Teacher; 437 De Leon Dr., El Paso, Texas 

79912 

Reserves 

None 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN (10) W 

Sec. C, Rows 11-12, Seats 8-12 

Potthoff, Harvey H.; (3) (M) Iliff Professor; 2201 S. University 
Blvd., Denver, Colo. 80210 

Hagiya, Paul H.; (1) (M) Minister; 6001 Wolff, Arvada, Colorado 
80002 

Persons, Williayn R.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 3224 S. 3075 
E., Salt Lake City, Utah 84109 

Hamilton, Ronald R.; (9) (M) Minister; 522 White, Grand Junction, 
Colorado 81501 

Byrd, William O.; (11) (M) District Superintendent; 2200 S. Univer- 
sity Blvd., Denver, Colorado 80210 

*Naylor, E. R.; (4) (M) Lay Leader; 3333 E. 7th, Denver, Colorado 
80206 

Ariki, Joe; (10) (M) School Principal; 3238 S. Beeler, Denver, Colo- 
rado 80203 



80 JouT7ial of the 1972 General Conference 

Moeller, Romane G.; (2) (E) Chrm. W. S. & F.; 7217 Ross Dr., 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 80907 
Anderson, Mrs. Virgil; (7) (M) President WSCS; 3860 Balsam, 

Wheat Ridge, Colo. 80033 
Wood, Dr. Donald R.; (13) (M) College Professor; 1920 Sheely Dr., 

Fort Collins, Colo. 80521 

Reserves 

Brown, E. Russell; (M) Minister; 1551 W. 106th, Denver, Colo. 

80234 
Babbs, J. Carlton; (M) Minister; 5209 Montview^ Blvd., Denver, Colo. 

80207 
Jones, S. Jameson; (M) Iliff President; 2201 S. University Blvd., 

Denver, Colo. 80210 
Rowbotham, Eugene B.; (M) District Superintendent; 3438 Yucca 

Rd., Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001 
Paulson, Delbert C; (M) District Superintendent; 88 Amherst, Pueb- 
lo, Colorado 81005 
App, Donald B.; (E) Program Director; 2200 S. University Blvd., 

Denver, Colo. 80210 
Brockman, Mrs. Vivian; (M) Housevi^ife; 3250 Fillmore St., Denver, 

Colo. 80207 
Huffman, Mrs. Frank W.; (M) Housewife; 620 Delmar, Sterling, 

Colo. 80751 
Byrkit, Ervin; (M) Rancher; Haxton, Colorado 80731 
Mclntyre, John J.; (M) Judge; Box 146, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82001 
Sohl, Mrs. Lowell; (E) Housewife; 2089 Fuller Rd., Colorado Springs, 

Colo. 80907 
Persinger, Mrs. John; (M) Housewife; 1536 E. 3010 So., Salt Lake 

City, Utah 84109 

SHANTUNG (2) OS 

No delegates elected 

SIERRA LEONE (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 4, Seats 11-12 

Smith, Alex J.; (5) (E) Minister; c/o U.M.C. Parsonage, Yengema, 

Sierra Leone 
Lagawo, Richard, E.S.; (4) (E) Teacher; P.O. Box 58, BO. Sierra 

Leone, West Africa 

Reserves 

Va7idy Rogers, Joseph B.; (E) Minister; c/o P. O. Box 121, BO. 

Sierra Leone 
Bailor, Alfred M.; (E) Education Secy.; P. 0. Box 523, Freetown, 

Sierra Leone, West Africa 

SOUTH CAROLINA (1866) (2) SE 

Sec. C, Row 12, Seats 4-5 

* Jenkins, Warren M.; (9) (M) Exec. Program Council; 1200 Davis 

St., Evanston, 111. 60201 
Mack, James; (3) (M) Instructor, Claflin College; Claflin College, 

Orangeburg, S. C. 29115 

Reserves 

Curry, John W., Sr.; (M) Conf. Treasurer; 191 Boulevard N. E., 
Orangeburg, S. C. 29115 



The United Methodist Church 81 

Summers, James L.; (M) Minister; P. O. Box 481, St. Stephen, S. C. 
29479 

Manning, Hubert V.; (M) College President; Claflin College, Orange- 
burg, S. C. 29115 

Fields, Richard E.; (M) Judge; 65 Spring St., Charleston, S. C. 29403 

Nelson, William L. J.; (M) Ship Yard "Oiler"; 2023 Riverview Ave., 
Charleston, S. C. 29405 

Baxley, Mrs. Beulah H.; (M) Conf. Pres. WSCS; 1327 Gregg St., 
Columbia, S.C 29201 

SOUTH CAROLINA (1785) (16) SE 
Sec. C, Rows 20-21, Seats 1-8 

Taylor, Eben; (14) (M) District Superintendent; Box 1056, Ander- 
son, S. C. 29621 

Spears, R. Wright; (3) (M) College President; 1320 Columbia College 
Dr., Columbia, S. C. 29203 

Moody, C. LeGrande, Jr.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 104 
Amherst Dr., Cherokee Hills, Greenwood, S. C. 29646 

Jones, Phil M.; (5) (M) Minister; Box 407, Batesburg, S. C. 29006 

Brabham, A. McKay; (9) (M) District Superintendent; 1320-A Fern- 
wood Rd., Spartanburg, S. C. 29302 

Fridy, Wallace; (6) (M) Conf. Program Director; 1420 Lady St., 
Columbia, S. C. 29201 

Barrett, James S.; (12) (M) Jr. Col. President; Spartanburg Jr. 
College, Spartanburg, S. C. 29301 

Whitaker, George W.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; Box 3505, 
Charleston, S. C. 29407 

*Kent, Harry R.; (4) (M) Construction; P. O. Box 932, Charleston, 
S. C. 29402 

Parker, Mrs. W. Roy; (7) (M) Homemaker; Box 224, Abbeville, S. C. 
29620 

Jerome, J. E.; (5) (M) Hardware; Box 403, Rock Hills, S. C. 29730 

Hyatt, Lochlan L.; (8) (M) Manufacturing; 300 E. Park Dr., Spar- 
tanburg, S. C. 29302 

Watson, Michael; (7) (M) Doctor; Bamberg, S. C. 29003 

Evatt, Parker; (1) (M) Dir., Alston Wilkes Society; 258 Chartwell 
Rd., Columbia, S. C. 29210 

Adkins, Joel C; (10) (M) ; Route 1, Pelzer, S. C. 29669 

Rice, Spencer M.; (11) (M) Associate Director, Program Council; 
1420 Lady St., Columbia, S. C. 29201 

Reserves 

Robison, John W.; (M) Minister; 200 Buncombe St., Greenville, 

S. C. 29601 
Cannon, Ralph A.; (M) Minister; Box 16, Darlington, S. C. 29532 
Crenshaw, Bryan; (M) Minister; 3407 Devine St., Columbia, S. C. 

29205 
Broome, Allan R.; (M) Executive Director, Epworth Ch. Home; 

2900 Millwood Ave., Columbia, S. C. 29205 
Brittain, Thomas N.; (M) Minister; P. O. Box 2947, Spartanburg, 

S. C. 29302 
Jenkins, W. Y.,Jr.; (deceased) 
Cannon, Joel E.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 57, Lake City, 

S. C. 29560 
Kinnett, William R.; (M) Minister; 1244 Naples Ave., Cayce, S. C. 

29033 
Lynn, Hawley B.; (M) District Superintendent; 129 Holly Dr., 

Hartsville, S. C. 29550 



82 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Reese, David W., Jr.; (M) District Superintendent; 1420 Lady St., 
Columbia, S. C. 29201 

McLeod, David W.; (M) Mayor; Florence, South Carolina 29501 

Hardin, Paul, III; (M) College President; Wofford College, Spartan- 
burg, S. C. 29301 

Workman, W. D., Jr.; (M) Newspaper Editor; 915 Beltline Blvd., 
Columbia, S. C. 29205 

Ready, Judson W.; (M) Retired; 1420 Lady St., Columbia, S. C. 
29201 

Jackson, Rhett; (M) Carpet Dealer; 4848 Landrum Dr., Columbia, 
S C 29206 

Hipp, J. C; (M) Furniture; 3390 Liberty St., Loris, S. C. 29569 

Holler, J. Carlisle; (M) State Board of Education; 6120 Lakeshore 
Dr., Columbia, S. C. 29206 

Moore, Roy C; (M) Dept. Stores; 209 Mclver St., Cheraw, S. C. 
29520 

Gardner, William A.; (M) ; Box 15, Ninety Six, S. C. 29666 

Carter, Fletcher; (M) Conf. Program Council; 1420 Lady St., Colum- 
bia, S. C. 29201 

SOUTH DAKOTA (2) NC 

Sec. A, Row 3, Seats 3-4 

*Pittenger, Richard; (1) (M) District Superintendent; Box 1304, 

Huron, South Dakota 57350 
Ortman, Ervin; (7) (M) Osteopath; Canistota, South Dakota 57012 

Reserves 

Sander, Harvey; (M) Minister; Box 579, Pierre, South Dakota 57501 
Hartung, Ron H.; (M) Minister; 1617 S. West Ave., Sioux Falls, 

South Dakota 57105 
Tarver, Russell E.; (M) Minister; 210 S. Plum, Vermillion, South 

Dakota 57069 
Grinager, Lloyd K.; (M) Minister; Box 683, Yankton, South Dakota 

57078 
Kuhler, Warren; (M) Hospital Administrator; Wakonda, South 

Dakota 57073 
Cochrane, Maynard; (M) Educator; 1212 1st St., Brookings, South 

Dakota 57006 
Lushbough, Mrs. Lillian; (M) Housewife; Sturgis, South Dakota 

57785 
Stengel, Jack; (E) Executive; Milbank, South Dakota 57252 

SOUTH GEORGIA (12) SE 

Sec. B, Rows 7-8, Seats 1-6 

Freeman, G. Ross; (13) (M) Minister; Box 534, Statesboro, Ga. 

30458 
Robertson, Frank L.; (3) (M) Minister; Box 1306, Valdosta, Ga. 

31601 
Duck, David A.; (5) (M) Minister; Box 747, Moultrie, Ga. 31768 
Waite, Alvis A., Jr.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; Box 876, 

Waycross, Ga. 31501 
Key, W. R.; (12) (M) Minister; 115 E. Church, Americus, Ga. 

31709 
Zorn, George L.; (1) (M) Minister; Box 975, Thomasville, Ga. 31792 
Wright, George A.; (2) (M) Retail Druggist; Box 267, Tifton, Ga. 

31794 
Rivers, Mrs. J. R.; (7) (M) Conf. President WSCS; Box 33, Camilla, 

Ga. 31730 



The United Methodist Church 83 

Thornton, B. I.; (4) (M) Lumber & Building Supplies; Box 190, 

Cordele, Ga. 31015 
Mayo, George W.; (8) (M) Insurance; Box 592, Savannah, Ga. 31402 
Carruth, Mrs. Carlton; (11) (M) Housewife; Box 408, St. Simons 

Island, Ga. 31522 
Henderson, Zach S.; (9) (M) Educator; P. O. Box 2045, Statesboro, 

Ga. 30458 

Reserves 

Hancock, C.W.; (M) Minister; Box 149, Macon, Ga. 31202 
Cleveland, Weyman R.; (M) Minister; 429 Abercorn St., Savannah, 

Ga. 31401 
Cariker, C. E.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 828, Thomasville, 

Ga. 31792 
Steel, C. E.; (M) District Superintendent; 631 E. Victory Dr., Savan- 
nah, Ga. 31405 
Robertson, Vernard E.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 2568, Val- 

dosta, Ga. 31601 
Alsohrook, W. A.; (M) Minister; Box 541, Bainbridge, Ga. 31717 
Shirah, A. Jason; (M) Minister; Box 867, Columbus, Ga. 31902 
Peterson, Will; (M) Manufacturer; Box 56, Soperton, Ga. 30457 
Braucht, Jack H.; (M) U. S. Civil Service; 101 Donald Dr., Warner 

Robins, Ga. 31093 
Martin, S. Walter; (M) College President; Valdosta State College, 

Valdosta, Ga. 31601 
Harrison, Walter; (M) Business; Millen, Ga. 30442 
Hall, Kenneth T.; (M) Optician; 121 Briarcliff Rd., Warner Robins, 

Ga. 31093 
Bostwick, W. E.; (M) Banker; Arlington, Ga. 31713 
Heard, Milton, Jr.; (M) Dentist; 285 Country Club Rd., Macon, 

Ga. 31204 

SOUTH GERMANY (4) OS 

Sec. D, Rows 13-14, Seats 11-12 

"^Sticker, Hermann; (5) (E) Superintendent; 741 Reutlingen, P. 
Corneliusstr. 26, Germany 

Sackmann, Dieter A.; (6) (M) Minister; 7 Stuttgart 1, Sophienstr. 
21 D, Germany 

Jetter, Richard; (9) (E) Businessman; 79 Ulm, Pionierstr, 3, Ger- 
many 

Fischer, Dr. Heinz P.; (1) (M) Court President; 79 Ulm, Haidweg 
9, Germany 

Reserves 

Dimmler, Rolf; (M) Superintendent; 88 Ansbach, Juedtstr. 15, Ger- 
many 

Schwaiger, Walter; (E) Minister; 7 Stuttgart 1, Silberburgstr. 134 
A, Germany 

Richter, Kurt; (E) Functionary; 714 Ludwigsburg, Hubertusstr. 19, 
Germany 

Kaelble, Alfred; (M) Functionary; 7144 Asperg, Osterholzstr, 33, 
Germany 

SOUTH INDIA (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 7, Seats 11-12 

Samuel, S. K.; (11) (M) District Superintendent; Methodist Church, 
P. O. Yadgiri, Mysore State, India 



84 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Devadanam, H. M.; (4) (M) ; c/o Rev. Solomon Sabana, Methodist 
Church, P. 0. Raichur, Mysore State, India 

Reserves 

Raja, Victor; (M) Methodist Boys Hostal, P. 0. Gulbarga, Mystore 

State, India 
Budarpur, H. C; (M) c/o Rev. K. T. Shanta Raj, Methodist Church, 

P. 0. Belgaum, Mysore State, India 

SOUTH INDIANA (18) NC 
Sec. B, Rows 13-14, Seats 1-9 

""Forbes, J. Kenneth; (2) (M) Exec. Asst. to Bishop; 1100 West 
42nd St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46208 

Hodapp, Leroy C; (1) (M) Program Director, Program Council; 
2427 E. Second St., Bloomington, Ind. 47401 

Hamilton, Richard E.; (3) (M) Minister; 2109 Lincoln, Evansville, 
Ind. 47714 

Crawford, Gene P.; (8) (E) Minister; 47 Union St., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 46227 

Emerson, Joe G.; (7) (M) District Superintendent; 1214 Southfield 
Rd., Evansville, Ind. 47715 

Stroh, Byron F.; (6) (M) Minister; 3808 N. Meridian St., India- 
napolis, Indiana 46208 

Rice, George E.; (14) (M) Minister; 2960 N. Capitol Ave., India- 
napolis, Indiana 46208 

Stanton, Charles F.; (4) (E) District Superintendent; 3 Orchard 
Lane, New Albany, Ind. 47150 

Koenig, Robert W.; (11) (E) Exec. Dir. Church Fed.; 1100 West 
42nd St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46208 

Green, Mrs. Robert E.; (9) (M) Homemaker; 117 E. Staat St., 
Fortville, Ind. 46040 

Wilcoxon, Francis; (7) (E) Insurance; R. R. 1, Brazil, Indiana 
47834 

Thomas, John J.; (4) (M) Attorney; R. R. 1, Brazil, Indiana 47834 

Bingham, Clifford; (13) (E) ; 1368 N. Ridgeview Dr., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 46219 

Susat, Edward; (10) (M) Dir. Placement Service, Univ. of Evans- 
ville; 2901 Wayside Dr., Evansville, Ind. 47711 

Bastain, Miss Mary Lee; (5) (M) Teacher; 1705 H Street, Bedford, 
Ind. 47421 

Bryant, Thomas; (2) (M) Census Bureau Clerk; 1431 Frederick, 
Jeffersonville, Ind. 47130 

Easley, John; (1) (E) Pharmacist; Clay City, Indiana 47841 

Evans, Daniel F.; (12) (M) Company President; 6463 N. Illinois, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 46260 

Reserves 

Blaising, Marcus J.; (M) District Superintendent; 604 Black Rd., 

New Castle, Ind. 47362 
Tyler, Charles A.; (M) District Superintendent; 644 East 38th St., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 46205 
Holmes, Robert C; (M) District Superintendent; 1005 N. East St., 

Greensburg, Ind. 47240 
Hancock, C. David; (E) District Superintendent; 58 Briarwood Dr., 

Terre Haute, Ind. 47803 
Marrs, Ross W.; (M) District Superintendent; 644 E. 38th St., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 46205 



The United Methodist Church 85 

Lawson, David J.; (M) Minister; 801 Main St., Beech Grove, Ind. 
46107 

Murphy, William T.; (M) District Superintendent; 644 E. 38th St., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 46205 

O'Dell, A. Glen; (E) Minister; 1040 Washington Ave., Evansville, 
Ind. 47714 

Christopher, Richard L.; (M) District Superintendent; P.O. Box 33, 
Vincennes, Ind. 47591 

Phillips, Samuel B.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 566, Green- 
castle, Ind. 46135 

Lorch, Basil H., Jr.; (M) Attorney; 1802 Crestview Dr., New Albany, 
Ind. 47150 

Pinaire, Edward; (M) Lithograph & Engraving Co.; 1210 West- 
wood Lane, New Albany, Ind. 47150 

Kibler, Russell; (M) Insurance; Farmersburg, Indiana 47850 

Crawford, Raymond P.; (E) ; 2103 E. Elm St., New Albany, Ind. 
47150 

Talbott, Norbert L.; (M) Exec. Sec'y March of Dimes; 179 N. Post 
Road, Indianapolis, Ind. 46219 

Penrod, Miss Blanche; (E) Retired, Dean of Women; 1846 Colt Rd., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 46227 

Graves, Wallace B.; (M) University President; Lincoln Ave., Evans- 
ville, Indiana 47714 

Hirschman, Russell; (M) Retired Business Executive; 7320 E. 96th 
St., Indianapolis, Ind. 46240 

Bechdol, Mrs. Ralph; (M) Homemaker; R. R. 1, Fountaintown, In- 
diana 46130 

Harris, Mrs. C. 0.; (M) Homemaker; 3118 26th St., Columbus, Ind. 
47401 

SOUTHEAST AFRICA (2) OS 

Sec. A, Row 8, Seats 9-10 

Penicela, Almeida; (M) Director of High School; Caixa Postal 1505 

Lourenco Marques Mozambique, Africa 
Simbine, Titos J.; (M) Medical Nurse; Caixa Postal 2640 Lourenco 

Marques Mozambique, Africa 

Reserves 

Helgesson, Alf ; (M) Missionary; 59 Westmoreland Rd., Kensington, 

Johannesburg, South Africa 
Mujongue, Chadreque J., (M) Field Treasurer; Caixa Postal 7, Mor- 

rumbene, Mozambique, Africa 

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA-ARIZONA (24) W 

Sec. A, Rows 17-18, Seats 1-12 

*Talbert, Melvin G.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 5108 

Meadow Wood Ave., Lakewood, California 90712 
Trotter, F. Thomas; (6) (M) Dean; School of Theology, Claremont, 

California 91711 
Cain, Richard W.; (2) (M) Minister; 5510 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, 

Arizona 85012 
Farley, Thomas K.; (1) (M) Assoc. Program Director; 5250 Santa 

Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90029 
Chen, Peter F.; (7) (M) Minister; 3500 S. Normandie Ave., Los 

Angeles, California 90007 
Phillips, Randall C; (11) (M) Minister; 711 S. Plymouth, Los 

Angeles, California 90005 



86 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Wheatley, Melvin E., Jr.; (3) (M) Minister; 10497 Wilshire Blvd., 

Los Angeles, California 90024 
Kcsler, N. Robert; (14) (M) Minister; 4690 Palm Ave., La Mesa, 

California 92041 
Galvan, Elias G.; (12) (M) Dir. Ethnic Plans & Strategy; 3954 

City Terrace Dr., Los Angeles, California 90063 
Gustafson, Laverne H.; (5) (E) Minister; 3295 Meade Ave., San 

Diego, California 92116 
Hildebrand, Will M.; (4) (M) Assoc. Prog. Director; 5250 Santa 

Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90029 
Trotter, J. Irwin; (10) (M) District Superintendent; 5250 Santa 

Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90029 
Bobbitt, Pauline; (13) (M) Conf. President WSCS & Homemaker; 

4014 El Rovia Ave., El Monte, California 91731 
Aguilar, Clifford B.; (6) (M) Dir. Hospital Purchasing Dept.; 5910 

Belice Ave., Long Beach, California 90815 
Myers, David L.; (5) (M) Vice-Pres. Memorial Park; 6300 Forest 

Lawn Dr., Los Angeles, California 90028 
Harkness, Georgia; (1) (M) Retired Professor & Author; 927 Emer- 
son PL, Claremont, California 91711 
Hook, Ralph C, Jr.; (4) (M) College Dean; 452 Dune Circle, Kailua, 

Hawaii 96734 
Hutchinson, Mildred; (11) (M) Homemaker; 1432 W. 102nd St., 

Los Angeles, California 90047 
Williams, George F.; (2) (M) Conference Treasurer; 5250 Santa 

Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90029 
Otwell, William; (7) (M) College Student; 1336 Hall, Tempe, 

Arizona 85281 
Cuaresma, Consuelo O.; (3) (M) School Teacher; Kekaha, Hawaii 

96752 
Martin, Gordon; (8) (M) Physicist; 2627 Burgener Blvd., San Diego, 

California 92110 
McKenzie, Leon T.; (9) (M) Vice-President Mfg. Co.; 2350 Daladier 

Dr., San Pedro, California 90732 
Saito, Kazuo; (10) (M) Landscape Gardener; 120 N. Bonnie Brae 

St., Los Angeles, California 90026 

Reserves 

Locher, Donald R.; (M) Minister; 305 E. Anapamu, Santa Barbara, 
California 93101 

Sasaki, James K.; (M) Minister; 333 S. Garfield Ave., Monterey 
Park, California 91754 

Mann, George M.; (M) Minister; 3759 Orange Ave. Long Beach, 
California 90807 

Coots, Fred H.; (M) Minister; 400 W. Duarte Rd., Arcadia, Cali- 
fornia 91006 

Zimmer, John A.; (M) Minister; 114 N. Pomona Ave., Fullerton, 
California 92632 

Torrance, Calvin W.; (M) Minister; 817 W. 34th St., Los Angeles, 
California 90007 

Harada, David J.; (M) Minister; 280 Panio St., Honolulu, Hawaii 
96821 

Hinshaw, Lawrence A.; (M) District Superintendent; 5250 Santa 
Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90029 

Ragsdale, Ray W.; (M) Minister; 1551 El Prado, Torrance, Cali- 
fornia 90501 

Edwards, K. Morgan; (M) Seminary Professor; 1080 Scripps Dr., 
Claremont, California 91712 

White, L. L.; (M) Minister; 3320 W. Adams Blvd., Los Angeles, 
California 90018 



The JJyiited Methodist Church 87 

Olivas, Mardoqueo L.; (M) Dir. Plaza Comm. Center; 648 Indiana 
Ave., Los Angeles, California 90023 

Robinson, Russell R.; (M) Minister; 5950 E. Willow St., Long Beach, 
California 90815 

Hole, D. Leslie; (M) Retired Business Executive; 4467 West 61st 
St., Los Angeles, California 90043 

Griggs, Ulysses S., Sr. ; (M) Exec. Housing Authority; 1524 West 
36th PL, Los Angeles, California 90018 

Grumbein, Percy; (E) Engineer; 845 St. John PL, Claremont, Cali- 
fornia 91711 

Mauerhan, Clarence W. ; (E) Citrus Rancher; 210 Narcissus St., 
Corona Del Mar, California 92625 

Cooper, Lawrence T.; (M) Retired Business Executive; 2710 Lorain 
Rd., San Marino, California 91108 

Walker, Marion R.; (M) Agriculturist; 2751 Poll St., Ventura, Cali- 
fornia 93003 

Akamine, Ernest K.; (M) Professor; 2255 Hulali PL, Honolulu, 
Hawaii 96819 

Harshman, David T.; (M) Insurance; 1125 E. Broadway, Glendale, 
Calif. 91209 

Allen, Jerry; (M) College Student; 8708 10th Ave. #3, Inglewood, 
California 90305 

Rollins, William B.; (M) Coordinator MUM; 9910 S. Cimarron St., 
Los Angeles, California 90047 

Lindsey, Jane; (M) Homemaker; 518 Carvalos Dr., Chula Vista, 
California 92010 

Self, Nancy; (M) Homemaker; 6481 El Roble St., Long Beach, Cali- 
fornia 90815 

Orton, Hubert E.; (M) Real Estate; 6253 Hollywood Blvd., Los 
Angeles, Calif. 90028 

SOUTHERN CONGO (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 4, Seats 11-12 
Kaputo, Elie M.; (11) (M) School Professor; Ecole Secondaire-Unie, 

Katubwe B. P. 780, Luluabourg Republique Democratique du Congo 
Muteteke, Paul; (3) (M) Director Normal School; Institut Brinton 

Mwajinga-Sandoa — Katanga, Republique Democratique du Congo 

Reserves 

Shindany, Joseph N.; (M) Minister; Eglise Methodiste-Unie, B. P. 

76, Kapanga, Republique Democratique du Congo 
Mulundu, Jonathan S.; (M) General Secretary, Congo Protestant 

Church Council; B. P. 2714 Kinshasa I, Republique Democratique 

du Congo 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS (8) NC 

Sec. C, Rows 3-4, Seats 6-9 

*Sims, R. Paul; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 402 N. Poplar, 

Carbondale, Illinois 62901 
Lowe, Donald L.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; 1019 N. Burtschi, 

Vandalia, Illinois 62417 
Lewis, William B.; (14) (M) Minister; St. Louis & 2nd, Edwardsville, 

Illinois 62025 
Hollis, Robert R.; (6) (M) Minister; 2 Signal Hill Blvd., E. St. 

Louis, Illinois 62203 
Fechtig, Norman; (3) (E) Assistant Supt. of Schools; R#l, Carmi, 

Illinois 62821 



88 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Thompson, Everett K.; (4) (M) Manuf. Concrete Prod.: Sesser, 

Illinois 62884 
Cummins, Marlene; (7) (M) Conf. Pres. WSCS, Teacher; 1710 Kane, 

Carlyle, Illinois 62231 
Stanley, David L.; (1) (M) Attorney; Carmi, Illinois 62821 

Reserves 

Kauffman, John E.; (E) Minister; 700 N. East Ave., Olney, Illinois 

62450 
Nettleton, James L.; (M) Program Director; 1919 Broadway, Mt. 

Vernon, Illinois 62864 
Henderson, Johii; (M) District Superintendent; 502 W. St. Louis, 

Lebanon, Illinois 62254 
Lippman, Roland A.; (M) Minister; 413 E, Broadway, Centralia, 

Illinois 62801 
Smith, Lowell; (M) Owner Auto Agency; Eldorado, Illinois 62930 
Davis, Doris; (M) Member Executive Comm., Gen. Bd. of Christian 

Social Concerns; P. O. Box 158, Robinson, Illinois 62454 
Buford, John L.; (M) School Administrator, Retired; 1020 N. 18th 

St., Mt. Vernon, 111. 62864 
Rider, John R.; (M) So. Illinois Univ. Faculty; Edwardsville, Illinois 

62025 

SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND (10) NE 

Sec. C, Rows 9-10, Seats 5-9 

*Caldwell, Gilbert H., Jr.; (2) (M) Exec. Dir., Ministerial Interfaith 

Ass'n., NY; 25 West 132nd Street, New York, New York 10035 
White, E. McKinnon; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 388 Porter 

St., Melrose, Mass. 02176 
White, C. Dale; (10) (M) District Superintendent; 43 Gould Place, 

East Greenwich, R. I. 02818 
Ziegler, Wilbur C; (6) (M) Minister; 204 Pondview Dr., Springfield, 

Mass. 01108 
Muelder, Walter G.; (3) (M) University Dean; 82 Oxford Rd., 

Newton Center, Mass. 02159 
Smith, Harold F.; (7) (M) Director, Hayden Goodwill Inn for Boys; 

9 Queen Street, Dorchester, Mass. 02122 
Johnson, Harry L., II; (8) (M) Management; 62 White Place, Brook- 
line, Mass. 02146 
Grain, Dight W.; (4) (M) Management; 10 Clover Lane, Natick, 

Mass. 01760 
Spurr, Miss Edith; (13) (M) Student Nurse; 240 Lynn St., Peabody, 

Mass. 01960 
Weinberg, Stanley C, Jr.; (5) (M) ; 197 Highland St., Manchester, 

Conn. 06040 

Reserves 

Harding, Richard E.; (M) Conf. Program Director; 286 Marrett Rd., 

Lexington, Mass. 02173 
Uhlinger, James R.; (M) District Superintendent; R. D. 4, Center 

Rd., Box 529, Bolton, Conn. 06040 
Post, John E.; (M) Minister; 18 McKay Ave., Fitchburg, Mass. 01420 
Felder, Cain H.; (M) Executive Director, B.M.C.R.; 890 Beckwith 

St., S.W., Atlanta, Ga. 30314 . 

Almond, Lawrence F.; (M) Exec. Director, Mass. Bible Society; 

652 Commercial St., Weymouth Heights, Mass. 02189 
Lindsay, T. Landon; (M) Special Ministry in Human Relations; 

18 Faulkner Hill Rd., Acton, Mass. 01720 



The United Methodist Church 89 

Gee, Thomas A.; (E) Executive; 5 Aberdeen Rd., Weston, Mass. 

02193 
Stewart, Mrs. Mary; (M) Housewife; Suncrest Dr., Somers, Conn. 

06071 
Bell Thomas; (M) Retired; 31 King St., Putnam, Conn. 06260 
Anderson, Mrs. Ruth; (M) Housewife; Bray Rd., Shelburne Falls, 

Mass. 01370 
Shinn, Ridgway F., Jr.; (M) Professor; 22 Whittier Dr., Johnston, 

R. I. 02919 
Yeo, J. Wendell; (M) Professor; 11 Brae Burn Rd., Auburndale, 

Mass. 02166 

SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY (8) NE 

Sec. C, Rows 20-21, Seats 9-12 
Sayre, Charles A.; (9) (M) Minister; 24 Hinchman Ave., Haddon- 

field, N. J. 08033 
Davis, Hooker D.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 510 Main St., 

Elmer, N. J. 08318 
Lee, Ernest W.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; 199 E. Lake Ave., 

Audubon, N. J. 08106 
Stanger, Frank B.; (3) (M) President, Asbury Seminary; 203 As- 

bury Dr., Wilmore, Kentucky 40390 
*Walker, Leon E.; (4) (M) Computer Supervisor; 432 W. Pine St., 

Audubon, N. J. 08106 
Shipps, Hammell P.; (10) (M) Medical Doctor; 136 Winding Way, 

Cinnaminson, N. J. 08077 
Hann, Edwin F., Jr.; (8) (M) Lawyer; Apt. A, 101 Farnsworth 

Ave., Bordentown, N. J. 08505 
Brogdon, Mrs. Elizabeth S.; (7) (M) President Conf. WSCS; 4 

Ramapo Lane, Beach Haven, N. J. 08008 

Reserves 

Cheney, Edward B.; (M) District Superintendent; 2 Denise Dr., 

Hamilton Sq., Trenton, N. J. 08690 
Marker, Charles W.; (M) District Superintendent; 725 Old Corlies 

Ave., Neptune, N. J. 07753 
Lang, Albert V.; (M) District Superintendent; 445 E. Main St., 

Moorestown, N. J. 08057 
Hawk, Louis B.; (M) District Superintendent; Sharp & Glenside 

Avenues, Millville, N. J. 08332 
Arnold, Frederick D.; (M) Minister; 47 Fountain Ave., Trenton, 

N. J. 08618 
Howe, Robert B.; (M) Minister; 36 Delaware Ave., Penns Grove, 

N. J. 08069 
Estilow, Ulysses S. ; (E) History Professor; Lincoln Rd., Mullica 

Hill, N. J. 08062 
Kirk, William; (M) O. E. O. Director; 18 Norman Lane, Willingboro, 

N. J. 08046 
Schilling, Kurt H.; (M) Federal Aviation Agency; 12 Lake Dr., 

Linwood, N. J. 08221 
Backenson, Henry L. ; (M) Insurance; 41 Lake St., Bridgeton, N. J. 

08302 
Davis, Elwood; (M) Banking; 1614 N. Arkansas Ave., Atlantic City, 

N. J. 08401 
Johnson, Mrs. Frank; (M) Housewife; 164 E. Atlantic Ave., Ocean 

City, N. J. 08226 



90 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

SOUTHWEST (2) SC 

Sec. D, Row 12, Seats 7-8 

*Lester, W. D.; (9) (M) Minister; 1113 State St., Little Rock, Ark. 

72001 
Preston, Alice; (3) (M) Pres. Conf. WSCS; Box 98, Murfreesboro, 

Arkansas 71958 

Reserves 

None 

SOUTHWEST GERMANY (4) OS 

Sec. A, Rows 11-12, Seats 6-7 

*Michelmann, Heinrich; (1) (M) Superintendent; 75 Karlsruhe 41, 

Auer Str. 20 a — Germany 
Mossinger, Manfred; (5) (E) Minister; 7534 Birkenfeld, Schillerstr. 

10 — Germany 
Wunderlich, Maria; (4) (M) ; 6 Frankfurt am Main 1, Grillpar- 

zerstr. 34 — Germany 
Hermann, Dr. Erich; (13) (E) Director; 6 Frankfurt am Main 50, 

Kobbachstr. 9 — Germany 

Reserves 

Kumm, Kurt; (M) Minister; 6 Frankfurt am Main 1, Wilhelm- 
Leuschner-Str. 8 — Germany 

Deiss, Werner; (E) Minister; 753 Pforzheim, Simmlerstr. 4 — Ger- 
many 

Hermann, Theodor; (M) 633 Wetzlar, Am Sturzkopf 24f— Germany 

Weber, Oskar; (E) ; 6 Frankfurt am Main, Egelsbacher Str. 1, Ger- 
many 

SOUTHWEST TEXAS (12) SC 

Sec. D, Rows 11-12, Seats 1-6 

* Dixon, Ernest T.; (6) (M) Staff, Program Council; 601 W. River- 
view, Dayton, Ohio 45406 
Heaeock, Jack D.; (11) (M) District Superintendent; Box 6301, 

Corpus Christi, Texas 78411 
Ricker, George M.; (5) (M) Minister; 3151 Reid Drive, Corpus 

Christi, Texas 78404 
Owens, J. Garfield; (7) (M) District Superintendent; P. O. Box 

28098, San Antonio, Texas 78228 
Richardson, Ted I.; (9) (M) Minister; 2140 Allandale, Austin, 

Texas 78756 
Seiler, Ralph H.; (12) (M) Minister; 230 E. Travis, San Antonio, 

Texas 78205 
Reavley, Tom; (1) (M) Judge; 1312 Meriden Lane, Austin, Texas 

78703 
King, John T.; (3) (M) College President; 2400 Givens Ave., Austin, 

Texas 78722 
Walker, James M.; (2) (M) Electronics; 973 Jefferson Ave., Seguin, 

Texas 78155 
McMillan, Mrs. Norris; (13) (M) Member, Bd. of Missions; Mason, 

Texas 76856 
Hand, Don J.; (4) (M) Attorney; 723 Pickwell Dr., San Antonio, 

Texas 78223 



The United Methodist Church 91 

Wilshusen, Mrs. John; (10) (M) Conf. Pres. WSCS; 326 Glenmore, 
Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 

Reserves 

Holmes, William A.; Minister; 2409 Guadalupe St., Austin, Texas 

78703 
Woods, Prenza L.; (M) Assoc. Prog. Dir. ; Box 28098, San Antonio, 

Texas 78228 
Hierholzer, Elmer J.; (M) District Superintendent; 1209 Whitewing, 

McAllen, Texas 78501 
Harris, William M.; (M) District Superintendent; 4012 Crescent 

Dr Austin Texas 78722 
Ader',Joe K.;\u) Minister; Box 268, El Campo, Texas 77437 
Gray, Barrel D.; (M) Minister; 227 W. Woodlawn, San Antonio, 

Texas 78212 
Mann, C. Jordan; (M) District Superintendent; Box 687, Kerrville, 

Texas 78028 
Lembke, Dr. Glen L.; (M) Theological Professor; 134 Bryker Dr., 

San Antonio, Texas 78209 
McQueen, Jack; (M) Bell Telephone Executive; 4650 Janssen, Corpus 

Christi, Texas 78411 
Woolsey, R. W.; (M) Attorney; Box 2446, Corpus Christi, Texas 
Perry, Kirby W.; (M) Architect; Box 5544, Austin, Texas 78703 
Brovi^n, Dr. Claude W.; (M) Oil Development; Box 1029, McCamey, 

Texas 79752 
Spruce, Miss Susan; (M) Student; c/o Mrs. Robert Spruce, Flores- 

ville, Texas 78011 
Erck, Fred; (M) Rancher & Banker; Box 156, Alice, Texas 78332 

SWEDEN (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 11, Seats 6-7 

Larson, Gunnar E.; (5) (M) Minister; Sturegatan 16, S 502 31 

Boras, Sw^eden 
*Amark, Curt; (4) (M) Doctor; Sagostigen 5, 161 37 Bromma, 

Sweden 

Reserves 

Berg, Josef E.; (M) District Superintendent; Aschebergsg. 38,411.33 

Goteborg, Sweden 
Lindell, Rolf; (M) Minister; Frostv. 19, 441 00 Alingsas, Sweden 
Wedar, Torsten E. V.; (M) Minister; Sibylleg. 18, 114 42 Stockholm, 

Sweden 
Carlstedt, Gustav G.; (M) Minister; Flemingg. 14, 602 24 Norrkoping, 

Sweden 
Holm, Carl-Axel; (M) Fil. Mag. Teacher; Liljeholmens Folkhogskola, 

590 41 Rimforsa, Sweden 
Collin, Anne Marie; (M) Seminary Teacher; Box 376, 721 07 Vasteras, 

Sweden 
Nordieng, Ingemar; (M) Optician; Hallandsg, 30, 571 00 Nassjo, 

Sweden 
Carro, Bengt; (M) Ing.; Egilsv. 84, 151 57 Soder*alje, Sweden 

SWITZERLAND (M) (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 12, Seats 11-12 
Tobler, Theophil J.; (5) (M) Superintendent; Weyerstrasse 22, CH- 
3084 Wabern BE, Switzerland 



92 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

*Gsell, Theophil H.; (4) (M) Pres., Methodist Church in Switzerland; 
Hallwilstrasse 2, CH-5600 Lenzburg, Switzerland 

Reserves 

Siegfried, Peter M.; (M) Minister; Rue Kageneck no. 7 F-67, Stras- 
bourg, France 

Rohmann, Kurt M.; (M) Lay-Leader; Gartenstadtstrasse 21, CH- 
3098 Koniz BE, Switzerland 

SWITZERLAND (E) (2) OS 

Sec. D, Row 11, Seats 11-12 

Geissbuhler, Theo; (13) (E) Minister; Frey-Herose-Strasse 17, 5000 

Aarau, Switzerland 
*Stich, Siegfried; (9) (E) Textil-Kauf mann ; Larchenfeld 414, 4803 

Vordemwald, Switzerland 

Reserves 
Buchmiiller, Josua; (E) Minister; Gellertstrasse 144, 4000 Basel, 

Switzerland 
Merz, Alfred; (E) Chemist; Lettenstr. 5, 5200 Windisch, Switzerland 

TENNESSEE (10) SE 
Sec. B, Rows 5-6, Seats 1-5 

*Tomlin, William H.; (12) (M) District Superintendent; 410 Profes- 
sional Plaza Bldg., Madison, Tenn. 37115 

Corry, John G.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 306 Gay St., Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 37203 

Spain, Robert H.; (13) (M) Minister; 121 Davidson Rd., Nashville, 
Tenn. 37205 

Fowler, H. Thornton; (9) (M) Publishing House Representative; 
201 8th Ave., S., Nashville, Tenn. 37202 

Allison, John R.; (3) (M) Minister; 6018 New York Ave., Nashville, 
Tenn. 37209 

Ford, Floyd; (7) (M) College Professor; Rt. 6, Clarksville, Tenn. 
37040 

Roberts, Mrs. William T.; (1) (M) Pres. W. S. C. S.; 491 Brentview 
Hills Dr., Nashville, Tenn. 37220 

Stone, S. Lloyd; (4) (M) Retired U.S. Gov.; 903 Woodmont Dr., 
Murfreesboro, Tenn. 37131 

Buttrey, D. Roscoe; (10) (M) Banker; 5936 Sedberry Rd., Nashville, 
Tenn. 37205 

Sexton, Mrs. Joe; (5) (M) Homemaker; Dover, Tennessee 37058 

Reserves 

Ritter, Philip M.; (M) Minister; 220 Church St., Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

37130 
Broyles, Jay E.; (M) District Superintendent; 418 Minerva Dr., 

Murfreesboro, Tenn. 37130 
Strother, W.Bruce; (M) Minister; Gallatin, Tennessee 37066 
Alexander, Ben C; (M) Minister; 204 E. Spring St., Cookeville, 

Tenn. 38501 
Morris, William W.; (M) Conf. Program Council; 1907 Acklen Ave., 

Nashville, Tenn. 37212 
Jones, George K.; (M) Minister; 422 GlenPark Dr., Nashville, Tenn. 

37217 
Calhoun, Mrs. Frank A.; (M) Gen. Bd. of Missions; 204 Woods 

Cr., Columbia, Tenn. 38401 



The United Methodist Church 93 

Rosser, Mrs. Ellen; (M) Metro Empl.; 805 Lischey Ave., Nashville, 
Tenn. 37207 

Bell, James M.; (M) ; Dickson, Tennessee 37055 

Waller, R. W.; (E) ; Clarksville, Tennessee 37040 

Puckett, L. G., Jr.; (M) Businessman; Livingston, Tennessee 38570 

Atchison, Calvin; (M) College Professor; 940 37th Ave., N., Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 37210 

TEXAS (20) SC 
Sec. A, Rows 13-14, Seats 1-10 

*Hardt, John W.; (6) (M) Minister; Box 3247, Beaumont, Texas 

77704 
McCleskey, Wayne H.; (7) (M) Minister; 300 W. Ervi^in, Tyler, 

Texas 75701 
Randolph, Willie B.; (3) (M) District Superintendent; 5215 South 

Main, Houston, Tx. 77002 
Davis, Carlos W.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 300 W. Erwin, 

Tyler, Texas 75701 ' 
Shamblin, J. Kenneth; (2) (M) Minister; Box 22013, Houston, Texas 

77027 
Kellow, M. Keith; (9) (M) District Superintendent; Box 3666, Bryan, 

Texas 77801 
Fagan, Harold; (4) (M) District Superintendent; Drawer 1101, 

Nacogdoches, Tx. 75961 
Mayes, Allen M.; (8) (M) Staff, Bd. of Pensions; 1200 Davis St., 

Evanston, 111. 60201 
Shook, Wallace T.; (11) (M) District Superintendent; 5215 S. Main, 

Houston, Texas 77002 
Love, Elza L; (13) (M) Minister; Box 488, Bellaire, Texas 77401 
Goens, Ray W.; (2) (M) Physician; 2210 Maroneal, Houston, Tx. 

77025 
Strickland, Don L.; (4) (M) Business & Investments; Box 1268, 

Liberty, Texas 77575 
Seals, Woodrow; (1) (M) Judge; 1510 Lehman, Houston, Tx. 77018 
Humphrey, L. A., Jr.; (8) (M) Realtor, CPA; 5515 Ave. K, Galveston, 

Tx. 77550 
Pope, H. David, Jr.; (14) (M) Physician; 3411 Parkway Terrace, 

Bryan, Tx. 77801 
Morton, Mrs. C; (7) (M) Homemaker; 1360 Prairie, Beaumont, 

Tx. 77701 
Bramlett, Sam C; (13) (M) Business Executive; 3228 Indiana, 

Baytown, Tx. 77520 
Clark, Mrs. Lamar; (6) (M) Homemaker; 106 Westwood, Baytown, 

Tx. 77520 
Decker, Mrs. E. Moore; (10) (M) Homemaker; Box 1307, Jackson- 
ville, Tx. 75766 
Paxton, James R.; (12) (M) Attorney; Drawer P., Palestine, Texas 

75801 

Reserves 

Allen, Charles L.; (M) Minister; 1320 S. Main, Houston, Tx. 77002 

Hayes, Robert E., Sr.; (M) College President; Wiley College, Mar- 
shall, Tx. 75670 

Heflin, James M.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 898, Baytown, 
Tx. 77520 

Riley, James L.; (M) Minister; 6856 Bellaire Blvd., Houston, Tx. 
77036 

Haygood, W. Hooper; (M) Minister; 3611 University Blvd., Houston, 
Tx. 77005 



94 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Shoultz, Jack W.; (M) District Superintendent; Drawer 3606, Beau- 
mont, Tx. 77704 

Robinson, Richard H.; (M) Assoc. Program Director; 5215 S. Main, 
Houston, Tx. 77002 

Barrow, Emmitt C; (M) Minister; Box 1358, Port Arthur, Tx. 
77640 

Krause, Bruce E.; (M) Conf. Direc. Leadership Devel.; 5215 S. Main, 
Houston, Tx. 77002 

Orrick, L. C; (M) Minister; 5501 Beechnut, Houston, Tx. 77035 

Murray, Richard T.; (M) Professor, Perkins; SMU, Dallas, Texas 
75222 

Parr, Thomas H.; (M) Realtor; 3427 Bremond, Houston, Tx. 77004 

Wooten, Mrs. H. L.; (M) Teacher; Star Rte., Lovelady, Tx. 75851 

Robinson, Frank J.; (M) Utility Co. Supervisor; 1019 12th St., 
Huntsville, Tx. 77340 

Greer, W. E.; (M) Attorney; 1502 Driftwood Lane, Galveston, Tx. 
77550 

Allen, Joe B; (M) Attorney; 1105 Eden, Longview, Tx. 75601 

Faubion, Mrs. E. Maurice; (M) Homemaker; 3031 Robinwood, Hous- 
ton, Tx. 77005 

Jeter, Mrs. Velma M.; (M) Teacher; 1202 Third, Beaumont, Tx. 
77701 

Crawford, Mrs. Mary G.; (M) Professor; 808 Atkins, Marshall, 
Tx. 75670 

Sparks, John R.; (M) Attorney; 704 Sherwood, Pasadena, Tx. 77502 

Rooks, Frank; (M) FBI Investigator; 10606 Hazelhurst, Houston, 
Tx. 77043 

McGrew, Mrs. Mary M.; (M) Model Cities Program Planner; 7305 
Brompton, Houston, Tx. 77025 

TROY (8) NE 
Sec. C, Rows 9-10, Seats 1-4 

Adkins, Leon M., Jr.; (6) (M) Minister; 21 Sunnyside Rd., Scotia, 

N. Y. 12302 
Patton, Luther A.; (7) (M) District Superintendent; 8 Brookwood 

Dr., Saratoga Springs, New York 12866 
Melius, Arthur R.; (1) (M) Minister; 831 Jamaica Rd., Schenectady, 

N. Y. 12309 
Fishbeck, Royal B., Jr.; (13) (M) Minister; 6 South Lake Ave., 

Troy, N. Y. 12180 
*Ogden, Mrs. Selma; (5) (M) Housewife; 316 Northern Blvd., Apt. 

1-B, Albany, N. Y. 12204 
Cooper, Earle N.; (12) (M) Attorney; Church St., Nassau, New 

York 12123 
Kirchner, Frederick K.; (11) (M) Scientist; 9 Rural Place, Delmar, 

N. Y. 12054 
Waterfield, Donald A.; (4) (M) Businessman; 14 Robin Lane, Eagle 

Mills, Troy, N. Y. 12180 

Reserves 

Burgess, E. Clayton, Jr.; (M) Minister; 15 New Street, So. Glen 

Falls, N. Y. 12801 
Rhinesmith, John G.; (M) District Superintendent; 100 Observatory 

St., Bennington, Vermont 05201 
Conklin, Rowland S.; (M) District Superintendent; 4 Arden Craig 

Dr., Albany, N. Y. 12203 
Thomas, Robert B.; (M) Minister; 128 Adams PI., Delmar, N. Y. 

12054 



The United Methodist Church 95 

Trost, Mrs. Alice; (M) Housewife; 30 Fifth Ave., Saratoga Springs, 
N. Y. 12866 

Vanderbilt, Chester W.; (M) Businessman; 30 Birchwood Ave., Rens- 
selaer, N. Y. 12144 

Doty, L. Arthur; (M) Businessman; Salisbury, Vermont 05769 

Wusterbarth, Harold J.; (M) Accountant; 395 Daniels Ave., Sche- 
nectady, N. Y. 12304 

UPPER MISSISSIPPI (2) SE 

Sec. B, Row 8, Seats 9-10 

*Graham, John H.; (6) (M) Board of Missions; 475 Riverside Dr., 

New York, N. Y. 10024 
Presley, I. P.; (4) (M) Businessman; 111 College Ave., Kosciusko, 

Miss. 39090 



Reserves. 



None 



VIRGINIA (30) SE 

Sec. B, Rows 15-16, Seats 1-12 
Sec. B, Row 17, Seats 1-6 

Sanders, Carl J.; (9) (M) Minister; 3410 S. 8th St., Arlington, Va. 
22204 

Martin, Paul D., Jr.; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 4016 W. 
Broad St., Richmond, Va. 23230 

Douglass, Carl H., Jr.; (6) (M) Minister; 4604 Winston Rd., Ports- 
mouth, Va. 23703 

Fink, Harold H.; (13) (M) Minister; 903 Forest Ave., Richmond, 
Va. 23229 

Riddick, Roland P.; (2) (M) Program Director; 4016 W. Broad 
St., Richmond Va. 23230 

Hughes, Harold H.; (7) (M) Minister; 6935 Columbia Pike, Annan- 
dale, Va. 22003 

Newman, M. Douglas; (0) (M) District Superintendent; 7 Douglas 
Dr., Newport News, Va. 23601 

Eaton, Harry B.; (3) (M) Minister; 2309 Cameron Mills Rd., Alexan- 
dria, Va. 22302 

Tate, Godfrey L.; (1) (M) Minister; 3210 Garland Ave., Richmond, 
Va. 23222 

Lightner, George S.; (8) (M) Personnel (P. Area); 4016 West 
Broad St., Richmond, Va. 23230 

Fulk, Floyd L; (5) (E) District Superintendent; Box 317, Parksley, 
Va. 23421 

Carson, Joseph T., Jr.; (10) (M) District Superintendent; Box 265, 
Urbanna, Va. 23175 

Turner, James W.; (14) (M) District Superintendent; 5001 Echols 
Ave., Alexandria, Va. 22311 

Eutsler, R. Kern; (1) (M) Executive Director Meth. Homes, Inc., 
4611 W. Broad St., Richmond, Va. 23230 

Parker, Robert P.; (12) (M) President, Shenandoah College; 524 

Jefferson St., Winchester, Va. 22601 
*Bray, Jerry G.; (2) (M) Judge; 707 Liberty St., Chesapeake, Va. 

23324 
Jefferson, A. G.; (12) (M) Optical Supplies; 204 Pennsylvania Ave., 

Lynchburg, Va. 24502 
Walker, W. Roland; (10) (M) Business; Kenbridge, Va. 23944 
Rixse, John H., Jr.; (4) (M) Professional Engineer; 717 Grand Viev 
Dr., Alexandria, Va. 22305 



96 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Vaughan, William C; (13) (M) Business; 2306 Bedford Ave., Lynch- 
burg, Va. 24503 

Russell, John B.; (9) (M) Business; 1510 Ross Building, Richmond 
Va. 23219 

Robey, William T., Jr.; (3) (M) Business; P. O. Box 386, Buena 
Vista, Va. 24416 

Kellam, Harold B.; (4) (M) Business; 3113 Pacific Ave., Virginia 
Beach, Va. 23451 

Linhoss, John C; (7) (E) Business; 810 Hillcrest Dr., Staunton, 
Va. 24401 

White, Luther W., Ill; (3) (M) College President; Randolph-Macon 
College, Ashland, Va. 23005 

Tignor, Thomas P.; (5) (M) Business; 3925 Park Ave., Richmond, 
Va. 23221 

Born, Mrs. Harry E.; (7) (M) Housewife; 3046 Germantown Rd., 
Oakton, Va. 22124 

Simpson, John C, Jr.; (11) (M) College President; 158 Confederate 
Ave., Danville, Va. 24541 

Hartz, Mrs. Paul; (11) (M) Conf. President WSCS; P. O. Box 5, 
Waverly, Va. 23890 

Allen, Mrs. James; (14) (M) Housewife; 1720 S. Fillmore St., Arling- 
ton, Va. 22204 

Reserves 

♦ 

Minnick, Carlton P.; (M) Minister; P. O. BB, Williamsburg, Va. 

23185 
Kidd, Charles O.; (M) District Superintendent; 5001 Echols Ave., 

Alexandria, Va. 22311 
Ashby, Harvey W.; (M) District Superintendent; 1313 Grove Rd., 

Charlottesville, Va. 22901 
Knight, William E.; (M) Minister; 1024 Harpersville Rd., Newport 

News, Va. 23601 
Sheaffer, Lee B.; (E) Minister; 2421 N. Glebe Rd., Arlington, Va. 

22207 
Pannell, James M.; (M) Minister; P. 0. Box 906, Portsmouth, Va. 

23705 
Landis, Theodore E.; (M) Minister; 154 Holbrook Ave., Danville, 

Va. 24541 
Watkins, R. Beverly; (M) District Superintendent; 5016 Dogwood 

Trail, Portsmouth, Va. 23703 
Freeman, W. Carroll; (M) District Superintendent; 808 High St., 

Farmville, Va. 23901 
Sawyer, John R.; (E) Minister; 410 W. Beverly St., Staunton, Va. 

24401 
Gruver, Esdras S.; (M) District Superintendent; 162 Hawthorne 

Dr., Winchester, Va. 22601 
Potts, Edgar A.; (M) Minister; 3268 Allendale St., S. W., Roanoke, 

Va. 24014 
Felty, Beverly; (M) District Superintendent; 160 Hawthorne Dr., 

Danville, Va. 24541 
Davidson, John H.; (M) District Superintendent; 1647 Westover 

Ave., Petersburg, Va. 23803 
Johnston, Joseph S.; (M) District Superintendent; 5964 Joffa PL, 

Springfield, Va. 22150 
Mast, Jacob W.; (M) District Superintendent; 2233 Rivermont Ave., 

Lynchburg, Va. 24503 
Newman, John W.; (M) District Superintendent; 608 Mountain Trust 

Bldg., Roanoke, Va. 24011 „ ., 

Kelly, Owen T.; (M) Minister, Retired; 530 Hartswood Trail, 

Chesapeake, Va. 23320 



The United Methodist Church 97 

Pope, J. W., Jr., (M) Business; Boykins, Va. 23827 

Manning, Charles C; (M) Business; Palmyra, Va. 22963 

French, Burton L.; (M) Business; 3614 Paul St., Alexandria, Va. 

22311 
Header, James A.; (M) Business; Box 433, Salem, Virginia 23040 
Fears, Macon F.; (M) Business; Ontario, Virginia 23956 
Farley, Charles M.; (M) Business; 306 Royster Bldg., Norfolk, Va. 

23510 
Figgs, Clyde P.; (M) Business; Parksley, Virginia 23421 
Moss, Melvin C; (M) Business; Kinsale, Virginia 22488 
Tamkin, R. Naymon; (M) Business; Box 206, Strasburg, Va. 22657 
Douglas, Willard H.; (M) Business; 415 N, 2nd St., Richmond, 

Va. 23219 
Rowe, J. Edgar; (M) Business; 107 Salt Ponds Rd., Hampton, Va. 

23364 
Decker, Clyde A.; (M) Business; 2904 Replica Lane, Portsmouth, 

Va. 23703 
Wood, T. Clay; (M) Business; Landelyn Farm, Nokesville, Va. 22123 
Reames, David H., Jr.; (M) Business; 1026 Johnson Ave., Petersburg, 

Va. 23803 
Chiles, Charles E.; (M) Business; Louisa, Virginia 23093 
Huber, Paul W.; (M) Business; 2 Edgewood Dr., Nevi^port News, 

Va. 23606 
Snead, Dr. James G.; (M) Medical; 2923 Rosalind Ave., SW, Roanoke, 

Va. 24014 
Lockowandt, Walter; (E) Business; 10311 Wood Rd., Fairfax, Va. 

22030 

WEST BERLIN (4) OS 

Sec. B, Row 7, Seats 7-10 

""Eckstein, D. D. Herbert; (1) (E) Superintendent; 1-Berlin 33, 

Koenigsallee 70, Germany 
Manns, Herbert; (13) (M) Minister; 1-Berlin 27, Gorkistr., 127, 

Germany 
Doering, Martin; (4) (M) Conf, Lay Leader; 1-Berlin 19, Neue 

Kantstr. 6, Germany 
Meinhardt, Lydia; (7) (E) Conf. Worn. Leader; 1-Berlin 61, Dief- 

fenbachstr. 39, Germany 

Reserves 

Goebel, Eberhard; (E) Minister; 1-Berlin 46, Kaiser Wilhelm Str. 
29, Germany 

Brose, Winfriecl; (M) Minister; 1-Berlin 61, Bergmannstr. 22, Ger- 
many 

Kumm, Joachim; (M) Lay representative; 1-Berlin 41, Liebowzeile 
12a, Germany 

Kleinitz, Erwin; (E) Lay representative; 1-Berlin 61, Dieffenbachstr. 
39, Germany 

WEST CHINA (2) OS 

No delegates elected 

WEST MICHIGAN (10) NC 

Sec. C, Rows 3-4, Seats 1-5 

*Taylor, Lawrence R.; (8) (E) Minister; 1100 Lake Dr., S. E., 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 49506 
Page, Carlos C; (13) (M) Minister; 275 Pipestone St., Benton 

Harbor, Michigan 49022 



98 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Burns, Alden B.; (3) (M) Minister; 3919 Portage Rd., Kalamazoo, 

Michigan 49001 
Wright, James W.; (6) (M) Minister; 212 S. Park, Kalamazoo, 

Michigan 49006 
Pohl, Keith I.; (11) (M) UMHE-MSU East Lansing Direc; 118 

S. Harrison, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 
Wilcox, Katherine W.; (1) (M) Psychologist; 333 Sixth, Traverse 

City, Michigan 49684 
Newman, Mrs. Rosalyn; (7) (M) Housewife; 2518 Outlook, Kalama- 
zoo, Michigan 49001 
Peterson, Arden M.; (5) (E) Professor; 2236 Hamilton Rd., Okemos, 

Michigan 48864 
Babcock, John; (4) (M) Farmer; R. 2, Hartford, Michigan 49057 
Holbrook, Donald E.; (2) (M) Circuit Judge; Box 29, Clare, Michigan 

48617 

Reserves 

Avery, Keith T.; (M) Program Director; 11 Fuller S.E., Grand 

Rapids, Mich. 49506 
Tennayit, John W.; (M) Minister; 114 E. Michigan, Battle Creek, 

Mich. 49014 
Francis, John L.; (M) District Superintendent; Suite 208, Columbia 

Square Bldg., 181 E. Columbia Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49015 
Forkner, Stanley H.; (E) Staff Director; 11 Fuller S.E., Grand 

Rapids, Mich. 49506 
DeMoss, Lynn A.; (M) Minister; 600 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, 

Mich. 49224 
Selleck, Richard A.; (M) Minister; 2109 Carter Dr., Muskegon, Mich. 

49441 
Strong, Donald T.; (M) Executive; 4602 Canterbury, Kalamazoo, 

Mich. 49007 
Jackson, Andrew; (M) ; 829 Farnsworth, Big Rapids, Mich. 49037 
Sorensen, Earl; (M) Manager, Hudson Farms; Fennville, Mich. 

49408 
Lundquist, C. David; (M) Attorney; 2425 S. Park, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

49001 
Dean, Ben, Jr.; (M) Advertising Executive; 1349 Lenox Rd., S.E., 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 49506 
Kennaugh, John H.; (E) Executive Secretary; 514 Elmshaven, Lans- 
ing, Mich. 48917 

WEST OHIO (36) NC 
Sec. C, Rows 13-14-15, Seats 1-12 

*Messmer, William K.; (9) (E) Administrative Ass't to Bishop 
Ensley; 395 E. Broad St., Columbus, Ohio 43215 

Stuckey, Paul E.; (3) (M) Minister; 90 W. College Ave., Westerville, 
Ohio 43081 

Byler, Robert A.; (13) (M) Minister; 2657 E. Broad St., Columbus, 
Ohio 43209 

Graham, Joseph R.; (10) (E) District Superintendent; 898 E. State 
St., Athens, Ohio 45701 

Hardin, Granville N.; (14) (M) Minister; 395 E. Broad St., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 43215 

Rodeheffer, Calvin; (9) (M) District Superintendent; 522 National 
Bank Bldg., Portsmouth, Ohio 45662 

Riley, Sumpter M., Jr.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 205 Ma- 
sonic Bldg., Lima, Ohio 45801 

Colaw, Emerson S.; (5) (M) Minister; 1345 Grace Ave., Cincinnati, 
Ohio 45208 



The United Methodist Church 99 

Flinchbaugh, James E.; (6) (E) Minister; 2701 S. Smithville Rd., 

Dayton, Ohio 45420 
Biddle, Glenn H.; (7) (E) Director of Ministries; 333 Pearl St., 

Jackson, Ohio 45640 
Chiles, Paul D.; (8) (M) District Superintendent; 514-1/2 Third 

St., Defiance, Ohio 43512 
Vandegriff, Paul M.; (1) (M) Minister; 2658 Drummond Rd., Toledo, 

Ohio 43606 
Ber gland, John K.; (6) (E) Dir. of Admissions, United Theo. Sem.; 

1810 Harvard Blvd., Dayton, Ohio 45406 
Yocorn, Donald R.; (7) (M) Minister; 524 S. Collins Ave., Lima, 

Ohio 45204 
Dickhaut, Walter R., St.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 2138 

Madison Ave., Toledo, Ohio 43624 
Osborn, John F.; (2) (E) Assoc. Director, Program Council; 395 

E. Broad St., Columbus, Ohio 43215 
Dutt, Harold; (12) (E) District Superintendent; 601 W. Riverview 

Ave., Dayton, Ohio 45406 
Calkins, Raoul C.; (3) (M) Ex. Secy., Quadrennial Emphasis Com- 
mittee; 601 W. Riverview Ave., Dayton, Ohio 45406 
Hottle, Darrell; (2) (M) Judge; 355 W. Walnut St., Hillsboro, Ohio 

45133 
Slutz, Leonard D.; (2) (M) Attorney; Tri-State Bldg., 432 Walnut 

St., Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 
DeLong, Dale F.; (4) (E) Insurance Agent; 590 Ridgewood Dr., 

Circleville, Ohio 43113 
Hunt, Kenneth W.; (1) (M) Technician; P. 0. Box 73, Casstown 

Ohio 45312 
Hawkins, Donald; (4) (M) Attorney; 2227 Innisbrook Rd., Toledo, 

Ohio 45208 
Boda, Harold L.; (3) (E) ; 3101 Kenmore Ave., Dayton, Ohio 45420 
Leonard, Mrs. James M.; (11) (M) Housewife; 811 Francis Ave., 

Columbus, Ohio 43209 
Redmond, Charles D.; (12) (E) Attorney; 2857 Charing Rd., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 43221 
Heisel, Eldred B.; (4) (E) Physician; 5595 Roberts, Hilliard, Ohio 

43026 
Detty, Darrell; (5) (E) Business Executive; 411 Mill Lawn Ave., 

Oak Hill, Ohio 45656 
Momberg, Paul B.; (8) (M) Banker; 148 Wrenwood Lane, Terrace 

Park, Ohio 45174 
Cochrun, Edgar; (13) (E) Sales Engineer; Box 186, Etna, Ohio 

43018 
Cox, Miss Sarah; (1) (M) Claim Supervisor; 1324 Ida Ave., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 43212 
Henderson, Mrs. Henry; (10) (M) Homemaker; 5214 Ebersole Ave., 

Cincinnati, Ohio 45227 
Richer, Ben; (14) (E) Engineer; 3142 Huron PI., Lima, Ohio 45806 
Weston, Charles H.; (7) (M) Public Administrator; 711 Hayden 

Park Dr., Columbus, Ohio 43219 
Gilts, George; (13) (E) Retired; 641 Second St., Findlay, Ohio 45840 
Fichter, Joseph W.; (11) (M) Educator; 28 E. Vine St., Oxford, 

Ohio 45056 

Reserves 

Smith, William E.; (M) Minister; 3434 Broadway, Columbus, Ohio 

43214 
Davis, James T. (M) Minister; 3215 Woodburn Ave., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 45207 



100 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Dixon, W. Edge; (M) Minister; 296 Weyden Rd., Worthington, Ohio 

43085 
Seay, John W.; (M) Minister; 3486 Epworth Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 

45211 
Crabtree, H. Glenn; (E) Minister; 623 E. Boundary St., Perrysburg, 

Ohio 43551 
Sageser, David B.; (M) Minister; 2701 Zollinger Rd., Columbus, 

Ohio 43221 
Delp, Walter Owen, Jr.; (E) Regional Director Program Council; 

913 S. Johnson St., Ada, Ohio 45810 
Longsworth, John E.; (M) District Superintendent; Rock Knoll West, 

Rt. 6, Lancaster, Ohio 43130 
Miller, Millard J.; (E) District Superintendent; 1017 Oakdale Dr., 

Findlay, Ohio 45840 
Chow, W. Jing; (M) Minister; Etna, Ohio 43018 
Cryer, Donald W.; (M) Minister; 140 Stonemill Rd., Dayton, Ohio 

45409 
Minus, Paul M., Jr.; (M) Professor; 259 W. Riverglenn Dr., 

Worthington, Ohio 43085 
Wiley, Carl L.; (E) Minister; 4914 Cleveland Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

43229 
Smith, Rex C; (E) Regional Director Program Council; Route #3, 

Logan, Ohio 43138 
Shunk, Ralph K.; (M) Minister; 51 N. State St., Westerville, Ohio 

43081 
Ling, Carl C; (M) Minister; 900 Van Buren St., Fostoria, Ohio 

44830 
Fetter, C. Willard; (E) Minister; 1516 Salem Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

45406 
McCormack, James H.; (M) Minister; 225 Ludlow Ave., Hamilton, 

Ohio 45011 
Coad, Richard P.; (M) District Superintendent; 601 W. Riverview 

Ave., Dayton, Ohio 45406 
Emmert, Herman A.; (E) Minister; 1585 Compton Rd., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 45231 
Whitmore, Austin R.; (M) Director Program Council; 395 E. Broad 

St., Columbus, Ohio 43215 
Sampson, Charles T.; (E) Field Procurement Wright Patterson 

AFB; 308 Geneva Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45417 
Harbarger, Wayne Boyce, Jr.; (M) Electronics Engineer; 193 E. 

South St., Jackson, Ohio 45640 
Kaatz, Torrey A; (E) Facilities Manager; 2144 Millwood Court, 

Toledo, Ohio 43613 
Shields, Joe; (M) Banker; 301 South Patterson, Forest, Ohio 45843 
McVey, Charles; (E) ; 62 Franklin, Athens, Ohio 45701 
Trenary, Mrs. Phyllis; (E) ; 2578 Maplewood Dr., Columbus, Ohio 

43229 
Moots, Phillip R.; (M) Legal Advisor; 149 W. Kenworth Rd., Colum- 
bus, Ohio 43214 
Cochran, Robert E.; (E) Accountant; Route 2, St. Marys, Ohio 

45885 
Carter, Clifford L.; (M) Insurance; 561 Howell Dr., Newark, Ohio 

43055 
Lee, Jack W.; (M) Banker; 4152 Ural Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43213 
Goodwin, Mrs. Louise; (M) Homemaker; 2320 Shawnee Rd., Lima, 

Ohio 45806 
Medkeff, Mrs. Emma; (E) Homemaker; 6268 Banning Rd., Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio 45239 
Jenkins, Daniel C; (M) Judge; 128 S. Jackson PL, New Lexington, 
Ohio 43764 



The United Methodist Church 101 

Mclnturf, Wayne; (M) ; Route 4, McConnelsville, Ohio 43756 

Kelz, Linton; (M) Retired; 2800 Dixie Highway, Hamilton, Ohio 

45015 
Baker, Mrs. Jane; (M) Homemaker; P. 0. Box 68, Worthington, 

Ohio 43085 
Richardson, John W.; (M) ; Bowersville, Ohio 45307 
Baird, C. Robert; (M) Accountant; Gratiot, Ohio 43740 
Harkness, Nerval; (M) Salesman; Route 1, Box 130, Mt, Perry, 

Ohio 43760 
Ballou, James D.; (M) Businessman; 53 Japonica Dr., Cincinnati, 

Ohio 45218 
Bowen, John; (M) Attorney; 10 E. Town St., Columbus, Ohio 43215 

WEST VIRGINIA (18) NE 
Sec. C, Rows 7-8, Seats 1-9 

Bridges, Ramsey; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 938 Pine Hill 
Dr., Fairmont, West Virginia 26554 

DiUe, Robert E.; (3) (E) District Superintendent; 51 So. Florida 
St., Buckhannon, West Virginia 26201 

Collins, Claude R.; (1) (M) District Superintendent; 401 E. Wash- 
ington St., Lewisburg, West Virginia 24901 

High, Henry R.; (8) (M) Assoc. Direc. Program Council; P. 0. 
Box 2313, Charleston, West Virginia 25328 

Coleman, Harry; (14) (M) Minister; 106 McGoveran Rd., Charleston, 
West Virginia 25314 

Miles, Denver L.; (2) (E) District Superintendent; P. O. Drawer 
W, Romney, West Virginia 26757 

Risinger, Melvin S.; (13) (M) Minister; 815 Kanawha Terrace, St. 
Albans, West Virginia 25177 

Carr, Marvin H.; (7) (M) Minister; 216 Bosworth St., Philippi, 
West Virginia 26416 

Potter, Truman W.; (5) (M) Minister; 1221 Quarrier St., Charleston, 
West Virginia 25301 

Blessing, Roy E.; (8) (E) Insurance CLU; 2125 Lincoln Ave., Point 
Pleasant, West Virginia 25550 

Hoffman, Mrs. Richard; (3) (M) Housewife; 115 Washington St., 
Wheeling, West Virginia 26003 

Engel, Damon L.; (9) (M) Chemical Engineer; 405 Sheridan Circle, 
Charleston, West Virginia 25314 

Roberts, Sam; (4) (M) Student; Sophia, West Virginia 25921 

Everhart, Mrs. Frank B.; (12) (M) Housewife; 119 Price St., King- 
wood, West Virginia 26537 

Rogers, Mrs. Flyd; (7) (E) Housewife; 1706 23rd St., Parkersburg, 
West Virginia 26101 

Stanley, Miles; (1) (E) Labor Union Executive; AFL-CIO Head- 
quarters, Charleston, West Virginia 25314 

Paige, Mrs. Jean; (11) (M) Nurse; 181-17th St., Wheeling, West 
Virginia 26003 

Froe, D. W.; (10) (M) Office, Economic Opportunity; P. O, Box 
1063, Bluefield, West Virginia 24701 

Reserves 

Hinzman, Parker L.; (E) Minister; Box 336, Mason, West Virginia 

25260 
Davis, H. Homer; (M) Office of Economic Development; 1802 Wood- 

mont Rd., Huntington, West Virginia 25701 
Mick, Billee S.; (M) District Superintendent; 318 E. 7th St., Weston, 

West Virginia 26452 



102 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Smith, Rossing; (M) District Superintendent; 1716 Market St., Park- 

ersburg, West Virginia 26101 
Berisford, Martin A., Jr.; (E) Minister; P, 0. Box 367, Buckhannon, 

West Virginia 26201 
Bowyer, Richard O.; (M) Wesley Foundation; 1105 Locust Ave., 

Fairmont, West Virginia 26554 
Edman, Clarence D.; (E) Minister; 1023 Fairfax St., Fairmont, West 

Virginia 26554 
Reed, James; (E) Assoc. Direc. Program Council; 900 Washington 

St. E., Charleston, West Virginia 25301 
Dickens, Connie; (M) District Superintendent; 7 Larchmont Dr., 

Huntington, West Virginia 25705 
Eskew, Wendell; (M) District Superintendent; 1232 National Rd,, 

Wheeling, West Virginia 26003 
Belk, Mrs. Ethel; (M) Housewife; 1405-B 3rd Ave., Charleston, West 

Virginia 25302 
Miller, Harry; (E) Retailer; New Haven, West Virginia 25265 
Sebert, Lowell E; (M) Owner, Farm Machinery Co.; P. 0. Box 

568, Fairlea, West Virginia 24902 
Ryan, Mrs. Paul; (E) Housewife; 307 Locust St., Mannington, West 

Virginia 26582 
Bowyer, Mrs. John; (E) Housewife; 5800 Pea Ridge Rd., Huntington, 

West Virginia 25705 
Alley, Mrs. Clyde; (E) Housewife; 1110 Park Ave., Charleston, West 

Virginia 25302 
Smith, Stanley J.; (M) Student; 1629 9th Ave., Huntington, West 

Virginia 25703 
Everhart, Frank; (M) Attorney; 107 N. Price St., Kingwood, West 

Virginia 26537 
Lowe, Jonathan ; (M) Retired; Milton, West Virginia 25541 
Phipps, James; (M) Orthodontist; 9106 1st National Bank Bldg., 

Huntington, West Virginia 25701 

WESTERN NEW YORK (8) NE 

Sec. A, Row 5-6, Seats 7-10 

Eckel, Sherman B.; (8) (E) District Superintendent; 206 N. Fourth 

St., Clean, New York 14760 
Harrington, Richard W.; (6) (M) Minister; 711 Niagara Falls Blvd., 

Buffalo, New York 14226 
Millet, Edmund A. W.; (7) (M) Minister; 48 Donaldson Rd., Buffalo, 

New York 14208 
Modisher, Donald E.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 314 Harding 

Ave., Jamestown, New York 14701 
*Cooke, George W.; (1) (M) Lawyer; 77 Windemere Rd., Rochester, 

New York 14610 
Gundlach, Mrs. Elizabeth B.; (4) (M) Housewife; 326 E. Main St., 

Springville, New York 14141 
Lesher, Mrs. Rosalind M.; (3) (E) Beautician; Lakewood, New 

York 14750 
Merrow, Arthur S.; (2) (M) Fuel Engineer; 110 Oliver St., Hamburg, 

New York 14075 

Reserves 

Rowsam, Robert H.; (M) Minister; 60 Treehaven Dr., Lockport, 

New York 14094 
Shipman, Joseph C; (M) District Superintendent; Box 705, Batavia, 

New York 14020 
Lange, James A.; (Transfered out 9/1/71) 



The United Methodist Church 103 

Aldrich, Charles S.; (M) Program Council Director; 96 Mount 

Vernon Rd., Buffalo, New York 14226 
Zentz, Franklin M.; (M) District Superintendent; 2 Brantwood Dr., 

Buffalo, New York 14226 
Stamp, Mrs. Carl; (M) Housewife; 16 Fordham St., Batavia, New 

York 14020 
Bliven, Owen R. ; (M) Teacher; 58 Greenleaf, Tonawanda, New 

York 14150 
Minsker, John H. ; (M) Retired; 104 Maple Rd., E. Aurora, New 

York 14052 
Clay, Thomas B.; (M) Retired; 131 S. Meadow Dr., Orchard Park, 

New York 14127 
Kraatz, Alvin L., Sr,; (E) Laundry & Dry Cleaning; 100 The Com- 
mons, Buffalo, New York 14221 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (24) SE 
Sec. C, Rows 5-6, Seats 1-12 

*Peters, James C; (9) (M) District Superintendent; Box 993, Win- 
ston-Salem, North Carolina 27102 

Murray, Jerry D.; (2) (M) District Superintendent; 319 Summitt 
Ave., Statesville, N. C. 28677 

Whites, Charles D.; (12) (M) District Superintendent; 1540 West- 
brook Cr., Gastonia, N. C. 28052 

Weldon, Wilson O.; (5) (M) Editor; 1908 Grand Ave., Nashville, 
Tenn. 37203 

Nicholson, R. Herman; (6) (M) Minister; 2810 Providence Rd., 
Charlotte, N. C. 28211 

Lindsey, Julian A.; (10) (M) District Superintendent; 1130 West- 
ridge Rd., Greensboro, N. C. 27410 

Young, H. Claude; (7) (M) Assoc. Program Director; Box 749, 
Statesville, North Carolina 28677 

Madison, J. Clay; (8) (M) Program Director; 207 Hawthorne Ln., 
Charlotte, N. C. 28204 

Shore, Philip L., Jr.; (13) (M) Minister; Box 426, Thomasville, 
North Carolina 27360 

Bethea, Joseph B.; (9) (M) Minister; 1200 Julian St., Greensboro, 
N. C. 27406 

Heckard, Cecil L.; (11) (M) District Superintendent; 2318 Richard- 
son Dr., Charlotte, N. C. 28211 

Young, Robert T.; (6) (M) Assistant Dean; 105 Divinity, Duke 
University, Durham, N. C. 27205 

King, Mrs. Mary E.; (11) (M) Housewife; 2701 Selwyn Ave., Char- 
lotte, N. C. 28209 

Barnhardt, Mrs. Lurleen G.; (1) (M) Conf. Chrm. Ecu. Affairs; 
5830 Creola Rd., Charlotte, N. C. 28201 

Henderson, William R.; (1) (M) Advertising Executive; Box 191, 
High Point, N. C. 27261 

Redding, Mrs. Viola; (7) (M) Conf. President WSCS; Box 458, 
Asheboro, N. C. 27203 

Bailey, Wesley; (3) (M) Attorney; 707 Ransom Rd., Winston-Sa- 
lem, N. C. 27106 

Hyatt, Carl B.; (4) (M) Executive; 9 Woodcrest, Asheville, N. C. 
28804 

Majors, R. Powell; (8) (M) Businessman; 2749 Picardy PI., Char- 
lotte, North Carolina 28209 

Miller, Isaac H.; (3) (M) College President; Bennett College, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27202 

Dudley, E. M.; (M) Investor; 211 Ridgecrest Dr., Lenoir, North 
Carolina 28645 



104 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Hood, Robin P.; (2) (M) Banker; Box 189, Marion, North Carolina 

28752 
Morrison, Mrs. Mary; (4) (M) Retired Teacher; Rt. 4, Box 129, 

Statesville, North Carolina 28677 
Ford, Edwin C; (13) (M) Businessman; O. E. Ford Co., Shelby, 

North Carolina 28150 

Reserves 

Tuttle, Robert G.; (M) District Superintendent; Box 426, Lake 

Junaluska, North Carolina, 28745 
Fitzgerald, Ernest A.; (M) Minister; Box 608, Winston-Salem, 

North Carolina 27102 
Harbin, Melton E.; (M) District Superintendent; 1236 Maxwell St., 

Salisbury, North Carolina 28144 
Nease, Edgar H.; (M) Ex. Dir. Lake Junaluska Assembly; Box 67, 

Lake Junaluska, North Carolina 28745 
Williams, Harley M.; (M) Minister; 302 W. Market St., Greensboro, 

North Carolina 27401 
Christy, John H.; (M) Minister; 34 Sheppard Dr., Asheville, North 

Carolina 28806 
Lang ford, Thomas A.; (M) Seminary Dean; Box 4735, Duke Station, 

Durham, North Carolina 27706 
Dickson, Clarence H.; (M) Minister; Box 307, Lexington, North 

Carolina 27292 
Shannon, Charles E.; (M) Minister; 1200 South St., Gastonia, North 

Carolina 28053 
Hutchinson, Orion N., Jr.; (M) Minister; 500 N. Broad St., Brevard, 

North Carolina 28712 
Faulkner, Arthur M.; (M) Minister; Box 6094, Charlotte, North 

Carolina 28207 
Ferree, James W.; (M) Assoc. Program Director; 207 Hawthorne 

Ln., Charlotte, North Carolina 28204 
Medlin, William T., Jr.; (M) Minister; 2300 Friendly Ave., Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27403 
Beaman, Charles G., Jr.; (M) Minister; 311 3rd Ave., N. E., Hickory, 

North Carolina 28601 
Corriher, Walter D.; (M) District Superintendent; 102 W. Fort St., 

Marion, North Carolina 28752 
Smith, Robert M.; (M) Businessman; Box 792, Mt. Airy, North 

Carolina 27030 
Winchester, Clarence M. ; (M) Businessman; Box 20108, Greensboro, 

North Carolina 27402 
Erwin, Richard C; (M) Attorney; Suite 1223, Wachovia Bank Bldg., 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 27102 
Sales, Philip N.; (M) Chemical Engineer; 80 School Rd., Asheville, 

North Carolina 28806 
Price, James S.; (M) Optometrist; 6615 Terry Ln., Charlotte, North 

Carolina 28212 
Smith, Harvey J.; (M) Businessman; 1211 Buckingham Rd., Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408 
Phillips, Charles W.; (M) Retired Educator; 210 S. Tremont, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27403 
Massie, Hugh; (M) Dept. Store; 148 Main St., Waynesville, North 

Carolina 28786 
Summers, James A.; (M) Business Executive; Box 1353, Salisbury, 

North Carolina 28144 
Dillin, 0. E.; (M) Realtor; Box 444, Kernersville, North Carolina 

27284 
Finch, George D.; (M) Retired Bus. Executive; Box 1, Thomasville, 

North Carolina 27360 



The United Methodist Church 105 

Hartsell, Woodrow W.; (M) Educator; Box 152, Concord, North 
Carolina 28025 

Baker, Robert L.; (M) Conf. Pres. UMYF; 313 Armstrong Park Rd., 
Gastonia, North Carolina 28052 

Parrish, Robert L.; (M) Insurance; 320 Birchwood, High Point, 
North Carolina 27262 

Sink, Archie; (M) Egg Producer; Box 339, Lexington, North Caro- 
lina 27292 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA (24) NE 
Sec. B, Rows 18-19, Seats 1-12 

'^Warman, John B.; (2) (M) Minister; 4887 Doverdell Dr., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 15236 

Rutter, Kenneth P.; (6) (M) Minister; 12 Northmont St., Greens- 
burg, Pa. 15601 

Woomer, James A.; (1) (E) District Superintendent; 65 Shady Dr., 
Indiana, Pa. 15701 

Lindqwist, Harold V.; (5) (E) Minister; 2925 Myrtle St., Erie, Pa. 
16508 

Grove, William B.; (11) (M) Minister; Center at Aiken, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 15208 

Fisher, Harry J.; (8) (E) District Superintendent; 324 Nadona 
Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 15904 

Meiischke, Paul J.; (6) (M) District Superintendent; 119 Morrison 
Dr., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15216 

Lash, H. Donald; (14) (E) Minister; 476 W. Patriot St., Somerset, 
Pa. 15501 

Sease, Gene E.; (13) (E) College President; 4001 Otterbein Ave., 
Indianapolis, Indiana 46227 

Carraway, James L.; (8) (M) Program Director; 408 Seventh Ave., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219 

Easter, Paul M.; (13) (M) District Superintendent; 309 Dragon 
Rouge Dr., Greensburg, Pa. 15601 

Ho^ve, Robert C; (7) (M) Minister; 733 South Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
15221 

DeVaux, Mrs. Thomas; (4) (E) Housewife; 331 N. Maple Ave., 
Greensburg, Pa. 15601 

Blackstone, Franklin, Jr.; (11) (M) Lawyer; RD 1, Zelienople, Pa. 
16063 

Beatty, William M.; (2) (M) Camp Director; RD 1, Box 734, Hop- 
wood, Pa. 15445 

Bell, Raymond M.; (3) (M) College Professor; 413 Burton Ave., 
Washington, Pa. 15301 

Bittner, Dwight M.; (4) (E) Business Administrator; 408 Seventh 
Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219 

Chaffee, Paul; (9) (M) ; RD 4, Union City, Pa. 16438 

Anderegg, Miss Joyce; (14) (E) ; P. O. Box 36, Russell, Pa. 16346 

Chadwick, Mrs. Dorothy; (13) (M) Housewife; 5 Woodbine Dr., 
Greenville, Pa. 16125 

Gwyer, Herbert L.; (9) (M) Sales; 435 Dickson Ave., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 15202 

Cain, Mrs. James S. ; (1) (M) Housewife; 191 Pinecrest Dr., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 15237 

Cockerille, Miss Clara; (10) (M) Teaching; 165 Beechwood Rd., 
New Wilmington, Pa. 16142 

Bell, Lester H.; (12) (E) ; Highland Dr., Cooperstown, Pa. 16317 

Reserves 

Siess, Robert J.; (M) District Superintendent; 117 Davis St., Con- 
nellsville, Pa. 15425 



106 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Crawford, Arthur M.; (M) Minister; 516 Chesnut St., Meadville, 

Pa. 16335 
Mowrey, James D.; (E) Minister; 518 Fronheiser St., Johnstown, 

Pa. 15902 
Emerick, Jack F.; (E) COP A Counselor; 408 Seventh Ave., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 15219 
Dietrich, Clyde W.; (E) Minister; 46 E. High St., Union City, Pa. 

16438 
Jolley, Delbert E.; (M) Minister; Church & Seventh St., Indiana, 

Pa. 15701 
Cousins, James G.; (M) District Superintendent; 83 Cervone Dr., 

Meadville, Pa. 16335 
Bishop, Bruce H.; (E) Minister; 899 Fairman Ave., Indiana, Pa. 

15701 
Roney, Herman F.; (M) Minister; 311 Wyllis St., Oil City, Pa. 

16301 
Bergmann, Lynn A.; (E) Hospital Administrator; 31 North Park 

Ave., Meadville, Pa. 16335 
Thompson, Bishop S.; (M) Minister; 800 Wilkinsburg Ave., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 15208 
Bugbee, Warren A.; (M) Minister; 145 Greenhill Dr., Butler, Pa. 

16001 
McCormick, Gerald A.; (E) Minister; 1516 21st St., Beaver Falls, 

Pa. 15010 
Crocker, Hugh D.; (M) Minister; 607 W. 2nd St., Oil City, Pa. 

16301 
Bishop, Mrs. Gerald 0.; (E); RFD 3, Box 363, Johnstown, Pa. 15904 
Rote, G. Eugene; (E) ; Box 316, Duke Center, Pa. 16729 
Donner, James L.; (M) ; 1510 Fairfax, Erie, Pa. 16502 
Reynolds, Paul C; (M) Education; 705 Beechwood Blvd., Ellwood 

City, Pa. 16117 
Haun, Miss Mildred; (E) ; 139 Elm St., Franklin, Pa. 16323 
McCormick, Paul R.; (E) 501 Horizon View, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15235 
Hershberger, George; (E) ; Star Route, Scottdale, Pa. 15683 
Bennett, Benjamin; (M) ; 3008 Harcourt Dr., Greensburg, Pa. 15601 
Miles, Emory S.; (M) ; 3201 Caughey Rd., Erie, Pa. 16506 
Cook, Dean F.; (M) ; 1024 Hillside Trail, Johnstown, Pa. 15905 
Johnson, John G.; (M) ; 314 E. Butler St., Mercer, Pa. 16137 
Handy, Miss Doris M.; (M) ; 3350 McNeil PI., Pittsburgh, Pa. 15219 
Ford, Earl L.; (M) ; 214 Walnut St., St. Marys, Pa. 15857 
Ledebur, Gilbert; (E) ; Box 142, Derrick City, Pa. 16727 

WISCONSIN (14) NO 
Sec. D, Row 19, Seats 1-8 
Sec. D, Row 20, Seats 1-6 

Schilling, Marvin A.; (5) (M) District Superintendent; 7748 Honey 
Creek Pkwy., West Allis, Wis. 53219 

Bender, Gordon R.; (6) (E) District Superintendent; 40 Park Lane, 
Fond du Lac, Wis. 54935 

Strosahl, M. Stanford; (3) (M) District Superintendent; 2231 E. 
Luther Rd., Janesville, Wis. 53545 

Truitt, Richard O.; (1) (M) Minister; 5555 W. Capitol Dr., Milwau- 
kee Wis. 53216 

Schul'z, Willard W.; (14) (E) Minister; 145 S. Prairie St., White- 
water, Wis. 53190 

Lindgren, Alvin J.; (2) (M) Professor; 2121 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, 
111. 60201 

Wilson, Winslow; (8) (M) Conference Staff; 325 Emerald Terrace, 
Sun Prairie, Wis. 53590 



The United Methodist Church 107 

* Roberts, Leigh; (7) (M) Psychiatrist; 4921 Fond du Lac Trail, 

Madison, Wis. 53705 
Lau, Clifford; (13) (M) Salesman; RFD, Jim Falls, Wis. 54748 
Mielke, Mrs. Sharon; (11) (E) Housewife; 2375 Prairie Ave., Beloit, 

Wis. 53511 
Soderholm, Mrs. Patricia A.; (4) (M) Housewife; 2035 26th St., 

Monroe, Wis. 53566 
Wilkinson, Donald; (9) (M) State Sec'y of Agric; 4237 Wanda PL, 

Madison, Wis. 53711 
Hinz, Lawrence ; (E) (resigned) 
Hundley, Mrs. Frances; (12) (M) Housewife; 8409 W. Hillview Dr., 

Mequon, Wis. 53092 

Reserves 

Saito, Perry H.; (M) District Superintendent; 1140 Ridge Rd., Stev- 
ens Point, Wis. 54481 
Kalas, J.Ellsworth; (M) Minister; 203 Wisconsin Ave., Madison, Wis. 

53703 
Weaver, Harold; (M) Minister; 1529 Wauwatosa Ave., Wauwatosa, 

Wis. 53213 
Zeharth, Herbert E.; (E) Minister; 527 Volk St., Portage, Wis. 53901 
Krause, Gerald A.; (M) Conference Staff; 325 Emerald Terrace, Sun 

Prairie, Wis. 53590 
Adams, Robert; (M) Minister; 2319 E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee, 

Wis. 53211 
Corbin, J. Wesley; (E) Minister; 7265 W. Center St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

53210 
Francis, John H., Jr.; (M) Minister; 28 Church St., Oconomowoc, 

Wis. 53066 
Martin, James L; (M) Industry; Route 1, Box 482, Oconomowoc, 

Wis. 53066 
Boettcher, Mrs. Lu; (M) Housewife; 401 Fleming Street, Wausau, 

Wis. 54401 
Sprecher, Mrs. Delia; (10) (E) Housewife; Route 1, Box 319, Sauk 

City, Wis. 53583 
Stevens, Donald; (M) Construction Engineer; 8822 West Park Hill 

Dr., Wauwatosa, Wis. 53213 
Mevis, Mrs. Joyce; (E) Housewife; 6215 Ravine St., Darlington, 

Wis. 53530 
Reinhardt, Halsey; (M) Farmer; Rt. 3, Richland Center, Wis. 53581 
Keller, Edward M.; (M) Osteopath; 305 Park Ave., Beaver Dam, 

Wis. 53916 
Cramer, Mrs. Irene; (E) Housewife; 120 Sheboygan St., Fond du 

Lac, Wis. 54935 

WYOMING (6) NE 
Sec. C, Rows 3-4, Seats 10-12 

Singer, Edgar F.; (1) (M) Minister; 708 Monterey Dr., Endwell, 
N. Y. 13760 

Akers, George R.; (6) (M) Dist. Superintendent; 19 Ravine Park- 
way North, Oneonta, N. Y. 13820 

Pitcher, Philip N.; (2) (M) Minister; 108 N. Broad St., Norwich, 
N. Y. 13815 

Gordon, Harry M.; (4) (M) Realtor & Insurance; Northeastern Pa. 
National Bank Bldg., Scranton, Pa. 18503 

Lashford, Mrs. Edgar J.; (7) (M) Housewife; R. D. 5, Shavertown, 
Pa. 18708 

Beebe, William L.; (14) (M) Electrical Contr.; R. D. 1, Wyalusing, 
Pa. 18853 



108 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Reserves 

Lukens, Robert J; (M) Minister; 101 E. Union St., Endicott, N. Y. 

13762 
Reid, William W.; (M) Minister; 65 Academy St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

18702 
Crayton, Alfred L.; (M) Dist. Superintendent; 248 N. Sprague Ave., 

Kingston, Pa. 18704 
Harring, James L.; (E) Minister; 109 Dana St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

18701 
Long, Richard B.; (M) Law^yer; 7 Overbrook Ave., Binghamton, N. Y. 

13900 
Hunt, Walter L.; (M) Retired; 6 Church St., Unadilla, N. Y. 13849 
Woodfield, Harry; (M) Supt. State Park; R. D. 1, Chenango Forks, 

N. Y. 13746 
McGregor, Mrs. Warren; (M) Housewife; R, D., Maine, N. Y. 13802 

YELLOWSTONE (2) W 

Sec. B, Row 3, Seats 11-12 

Soderberg, John C; (1) (M) Minister; Box 205, Fort Benton, Mon- 
tana 59442 

*Hood, Esther (Mrs. Chas.) ; (7) (M) Housewife; 401 Daly, Missoula, 
Montana 59801 

Reserves 

Herbert, Hugh S.; (M) Minister; Box 1444, Great Falls, Mont. 59401 
Robison, Roger; (M) District Superintendent; 222 Stillwater Lane, 

Billings, Montana 59101 
Mills, Ardilla; (E) Housewife; 620 Terry, Billings, Montana 59102 
Munson, Sam; (M) Insurance Salesman; 1134 S. Spruce St., Boze- 

man, Montana 59715 

YENPING (2) OS 

No delegates elected 

THE METHODIST CHURCH OF 
GREAT BRITAIN (4) OS 

Sec. B, Row 17, Seats 7-10 

Baker, Eric W.; (6) (M) Ex-Pres. of Conference; 21 Walnut Tree 

Walk, Eastbourne, Sussex, England 
Roberts, Harold; (3) (M) Ex-Pres. of Conference; 16 Dalegarth, 

Hurst Park Ave. Cambridge, CB4 2AG, England 
Kellaway, John W.; (4) (M) Banker, Vice Pres. of Conference; 9 

Sandringham Rd., Birkdale, Southport Lanes, England 
Webb, Pauline M.; (11) (M) Ex-Vice Pres. of Conf.; 2 Chester 

House, Pageslane, London N. 10 England 

Reserves 

Wooldridge, W. N. Charles (M) 1 Central Bldg., Westminster, Lon- 
don SWI 

NON-VOTING DELEGATES 

Representatives from Provisional Conferences outside the United 
States, Affiliated Autonomous Churches, Affiliated United Churches, 
and members of the Council of Secretaries are seated as non-voting 



The United Methodist Church 109 

delegates under provisions of The Book of Discipline. By action of 
the 1972 General Conference youth representatives, representatives 
from theological seminaries, and representatives of the Alaska Mis- 
sion, the Oklahoma Indian Mission and the Red Bird Mission were 
seated in this conference as non-voting delegates. 

PROVISIONAL ANNUAL CONFERENCES 

(See Discipline Par. 604) 

AUSTRIA PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

Sec. B, Row 1, Seat 2 

Gebhart, Robert F.; c/o The Bishop's Office, P. O. B. 135, 8026 
Zurich, Switzerland 

BALTIC-SLAVIC PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

No Representative elected 

BULGARIA PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

No Representative elected 

FINLAND-FINNISH PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

No representative elected 

FINLAND-SWEDISH PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

No representative elected 

HONG KONG PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

Sec. B, Row 1, Seat 3 
Leung, Lincoln; 11 Cheung Hong Street, North Point, Hong Kong 

Reserve 

Chang, Jackson; 1505 Liu Chong Hing Bank Building, Hong Kong 

HUNGARY PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

Sec. B, Row 1, Seat 4 
Hector, Adam; Felsoerdosor 5, Budapest, Hungary 

NORTH AFRICA PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

Sec. B, Row 1, Seat 5 

Larsen, Miss Liv; c/o Board of Missions, 475 Riverside Drive, New 
York, N. Y. 10027 

PANAMA PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

Sec. B, Row 1, Seat 6 
No representative elected 

SOUTHWEST PHILIPPINES PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

Sec. B, Row 1, Seat 7 
Spottswood, Curran L.; San Jose, Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 



110 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Reserve 

Spottswood, Mariam H.; San Jose, Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 

TAIWAN PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

Sec. B., Row 1, Seat 8 

Wong, J. C; 137 Min Sheng Road, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of 
China 

Reserve 

Twanmoh, Joseph K.; Soochow University, Wai Shuang Hsi, Shihlin, 
Taipei III, Taiwan 

YUGOSLAVIA PROVISIONAL (1) OS 

No Representative elected 

AFFILIATED AUTONOMOUS CHURCHES 

(See Discipline Par. 642.3) 

METHODIST CHURCH OF ARGENTINA (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 2, Seats 3-4 

Lavigne, Enrique A.; Espejo 423 MENDOZA, Argentina 
Seara, Dr. Albine; Salva 439 ROSARIO, S. Fe, Argentina 

Reserves 

Clausen, Arne; F. Madero 548, V. Sarmiento (Haedo) Bs. As., Ar- 
gentina 

Lombardo, Dr. Hector; Pinzon 740 1° A (La Boca) Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 

METHODIST CHURCH OF BOLIVIA (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 2, Seats 7—8 

Pantelis, Jorge; (M) Minister; Casilla 356, La Paz, Bolivia 
Aviles, Alfredo; (M) ; Casilla 356, La Paz, Bolivia 

Reserves 

Arakaki, German; (M) Minister; Casilla 356, La Paz, Bolivia 
Ampuero, Jaime; (M) ; Casilla 248, Sucre, Bolivia 

METHODIST CHURCH OF BRAZIL (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council — par. 1414.2 

METHODIST CHURCH OF BURMA (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 2, Seats 9-10 

Sein, Bishop U. Hla; 321 Godwin Road, Dagon, Rangoon, Burma 
Cho, U ; 34 East Bazaar Road, Dagon, Rangoon, Burma 

Reserves 

Chu, C. F.; 319, Godwin Road, Dagon, Rangoon, Burma 
Thein, Miss Daw Kyin; 105 Bondoola Street, Pegu, Burma 
Myat, U Tun; 9, Kyaunglan, Syriam, Burma 

Sone, Daw Khin; Grace Methodist Church, 131 46th St., Rangoon, 
Burma 



The United Methodist Church 111 

CHILE AUTONOMOUS CHURCH (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council — par. 1414.2 

METHODIST CHURCH OF CUBA (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council — par. 1414.2 

METHODIST CHURCH OF INDONESIA (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 1, Seats 5-6 

Hutasoit, E. M.; (M) ; Djalan Geredja No. 5, Tebing Tinggi, Deli, 

Sumatra Utara, Indonesia 
Hutagalung, Mr. F.; (M) ; Djalan Hasanuddin No. 7, Medan, 

Sumatra, Indonesia 

KOREAN METHODIST CHURCH (4) OS 

Sec. C, Row 2, Seats 1-4 

Choi, Chong Chul; Division of Mission, The Korean Methodist Church, 

K.P.O. Box #285, Seoul, Korea 
Kim, Chang Hee; General Affairs Division, The Korean Methodist 

Church, K.P.O. Box #285, Seoul, Korea 
Po, Mrs. Sun Hi Lee; Taejon Kindergarten Training College, 24 

Monk Dong, Taejon City, Korea 
Lim, Dr. Dui Sun ; Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea 

METHODIST CHURCH OF MALAYA- 
SINGAPORE (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 2, Seats 5-6 

Fang, C. N.; 313 Jalan Lobak, Seremban, Negri Sembilan, Malaysia 
Lim, S. T. Peter; 29 Boundary Rd., Singapore 9 

Reserves 

Bunsu, Joshua; P. 0. Box 155, Sibu, Sarawak, Malaysia 

Ong, Chaik Ghee; 54 Namly Ave., Singapore 10 

Jimbun, James; c/o Chin Foo Methodist Church, Kuching, Sarawak, 

Malaysia 
Wong, Lai Yen; c/o Methodist Primary School, Kuala Lumpur, 

Malaysia 

METHODIST CHURCH OF MEXICO (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council Par. 1414.2 

MURI CHURCH OF CHRIST IN NIGERIA (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 1, Seats 11-12 

Barawani, Ezra N.; P. 0. Box 21, Jalingo, via Yola, North Eastern 

State, Nigeria, West Africa 
Nyaku, Barau B.; P. O. Box 21, Jalingo, Via Yola, North Eastern 

State, Nigeria, West Africa. 

METHODIST CHURCH OF PERU (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council Par. 1414.2 

METHODIST CHURCH OF URUGUAY (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council Par. 1414.2 



11:2 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

AFFILIATED UNITED CHURCHES 

(See Discipline, Par. 645) 

PROTESTANT CHURCH OF BELGIUM (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 2, Seats 5-6 

Pieters, Andre J.; (M) Minister; rue du Champ de Mars 5, B — 1050, 

Brussels, Belgium 
Lheureux, Mrs. Ruth Fraisse; (M) ; rue du Champ de Mars 5, B — 

1050, Brussels, Belgium 

CHURCH OF CHRIST IN CHINA (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 2, Seats 11-12 
Wong, Peter; 191 Prince Edward Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong 
Tung, Chan Woh; Hoh Fuk Tong College, Castle Peak, N. T., Hong 
Kong 

DOMINICAN EVANGELICAL CHURCH (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 1, Seats 1-2 

Blondet, Raul; Calle San Juan Bosco 125, Santo Domingo, Republica 
Dominicana 

UNITED EVANGELICAL CHURCH OF 
ECUADOR (2) OS 

Sec. C, Row 1, Seats 3-4 

Tufino, Rene; Casilla 32-31, Quito, Ecuador 
Villalba, Sergio; Casilla 32-31, Quito, Ecuador 

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST IN JAPAN (4) OS 

Sec. C, Row 1, Seats 7-10 

Hanabusa, George; 551 Totsukamachi 1-Chome, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo 
160, Japan 

Brownlee, R. Wallace; 551 Totsukamachi 1-Chome, Shinjuku-Ku, Tok- 
yo 160, Japan 

Abe, Shiro; 2081 Taura, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa ken, Japan 237 

Sakurai, Ritsuko; 88-2 Miyamoto cho, Takasaki Shi, Gumma ken, 
Japan 370 

THE CHURCH OF PAKISTAN (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council Par. 1414.2 

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST IN 
PHILIPPINES (2) OS 

Representatives attended World Methodist Council Par. 1414.2 

OTHER NON-VOTING DELEGATES 

ALASKA MISSION (2) W 

Fison, David K.; (M) Minister; 915 Second Avenue, Fairbanks, 

Alaska 99501 
Stassel, Mrs. Jean; (M) ; 911 R. Street Anchorage, Alaska 99501 



The United Methodist Church 113 

OKLAHOMA INDIAN MISSION (2) OS 

Sec. B, Row 1, Seats 11-12 

Roughface, Thomas; 5700 North Portland, Oklahoma City, Okla- 
homa 73112 

Toahty, Mrs. Minnie; 2704 Northwest 11th St., Oklahoma City, Okla- 
homa 73107 

Reserves 

Deere, Kenneth; 2205 Sallie, Muskogee, Oklahoma 74401 
Chisholm, Calvin; 5750 South Seneca, Wichita, Kansas 67217 

RED BIRD MISSION (2) SE 

Bischoff, John W.; (E) Superintendent; Beverly, Kentucky 40913 
Lambdin, Mrs. Ruby; (E) ; Frakes, Kentucky 40940 

YOUTH REPRESENTATIVES (10) 

Bayle, David; California-Nevada Conference; 1901 Pacific Ave., Ala- 
meda, California 94501 

Danforth, Curt; Southern New England Conferance; 23 Bare Hill 
Rd., Framingham, Mass. 01281 

Evans, Leslie; Upper Mississippi Conference; 509 W. Main St., Stark- 
ville, Mississippi 39759 

Hamilton, Thomas M.; Central Illinois Conference; 211 W. Belle Ave., 
Rantoul, Illinois 61866 

Hutchins, Annette; North Georgia Conference; 2386 Sewell Rd. Apt. 
F-24, Atlanta, Georgia 30310 

Jones, Scott; Rocky Mountain Conference; 2716 S. St. Paul, Denver, 
Colorado 80210 

Miller, David B.; New York Conference; 2498 Yorktown Street, 
Oceanside, New York 11572 

Morgan, LaVeeda; North Indiana Conference; 1980 Monroe Lane, 
Gary, Indiana 46407 

Palmer, Gregory V.; Eastern Pennsylvania Conference; 1225 N. 13th 
St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 

Walls, Wanda; Detroit Conference; 2145 Syracuse, Dearborn, Michi- 
gan 48124 

SEMINARY REPRESENTATIVES (20) 

Barton, Walter C, Jr.; At large — Colgate Rochester, Southern New 
England Conference; 1100 Goodman St., South, Rochester, New 
York 14620 

Bates, William. L., Jr.; Garrett, North Dakota Conference; 916 Vb 
Noyes St., Apt. X-2, Evanston, 111. 60201 

Butler, Paul B., Jr.; Candler, North Georgia Conference; 826-6 Clif- 
ton Ct., Cir. N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 30329 

Byrum, Gordon L.; United, South Indiana Conference; R. R. #3, 
Arcanum, Ohio 45304 

Collins, Michael L.; St. Paul, Oregon-Idaho Conference; 3432 E. 7th, 
Kansas City, Missouri 64124 

Ewen, G. Dane; METHESCO, Southern New Jersey Conference; 
Methodist Theological School, Box 25, Delaware, Ohio 43015 

Green, Judv; Claremont, Southern California- Arizona Conference; 
1322 Randy, Upland, California 91786 

Kildow, Marnie; Drew, Minnesota Conference; 5410 Fairviev/ Ave., 
N., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55429 

Lurvey, John M., Jr.; At large — Harvard, Missouri West Conference; 
100 Albatross Rd., Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 



114 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

McFadden, Vivian Patricia; Gammon; 653 Beckwith St., S. W., At- 
lanta, Georgia 30314 

Meyers, Patricia A.; Wesley, Baltimore Conference; 12221 Marne 
Lane, Bowie, Maryland 20715 

Modisher, Christine; At large — Chicago, Western New York Con- 
ference; 339 Chesterfield Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37212 

Sanford, Alfred G.; Perkins, Central Texas Conference; Rt. 1; Box 
13, Riesel, Texas 76682 

Sarazin, Duane V.; Evangelical, Minnesota Conference; 4532 Oak- 
land Ave., So., Minneapolis, Minnesota 55407 

Schlichting, Donald A.; Iliff, Rocky Mountain Conference; Box 103, 
Merino, Colorado 80741 

Shindel, Katherine A.; At large — Union, Southern Illinois Confer- 
ence; 109 Herbert PL, Edwardsville, Illinois 62025 

Simpson, Robert O.; At large — Yale, New York Conference; 409 
Prospect St., New Haven, Connecticut 06510 

Snyder, Michael; Boston, North Indiana Conference; 30185 North- 
gate Dr., Southfield, Michigan 48076 

Stauffer, Marcus G., Jr.; At large — Colgate Rochester, Western 
Pennsylvania Conference; 1100 S. Goodman St., Rochester, New 
York 14620 

Tanner, W. Douglas, Jr.; Duke, Western North Carolina Conference; 
1234 N. Washington St., Rutherfordton, North Carolina 28319 

COUNCIL OF SECRETARIES 

{Discipline — Par. 603) 

Sec. A, Row 1 

Seat 

12 Bagby, Grover C, 100 Maryland Ave., N. E., Washington, D. C. 
20002 

11 Bailey, A. Purnell, 3900 Wisconsin Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

20016 

10 Bauer, Richard H., P. 0. Box 871, Nashville, Tennessee 37202 

9 Brandenburg, E. Craig, P. O. Box 871, Nashville, Tennessee 37202 

8 Brawner, R. Bryan, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 

7 Bullock, Henry M., 201 Eighth Ave., South, Nashville, Tennessee 

37202 

6 Burgess, Roger, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 

5 Church, Paid V., 601 West Riverview Ave., Dayton, Ohio 45406 

4 Clapsaddle, Gerald L., 601 West Riverview Ave., Dayton, Ohio 

45406 

Sec. A, Row 2 

12 Ewing, Miss Betsy K., 475 Riverside Dr., New York, New York 

10027 

11 Greenwalt, Howard, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 

10 Haines, J. Harry, 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10027 

9 Ham, Howard M., P. O. Box 871, Nashville, Tennessee 37202 

8 Holmgren, Laton E., 1865 Broadway, New York, New York 10023 

7 Hoover, Miss Theressa, 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 

10027 

6 Hoyt, Claire C, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 

5 Huston, Robert W., Ill United Nations Plaza, New York, New 

York 10017 _ , 

4 Jones, Tracy K., Jr., 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 
10027 



The United Methodist Church 115 

Sec. D, Row 1 

1 Lott, Clifford, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 

2 Miller, Miss Lois C, 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 

10027 

3 Ness, John H., Jr., P. 0. Box 488, Lake Junaluska, North Carolina 

28745 

4 Nichols, Sidney, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 

5 Procter, John, 201 Eighth Ave., So., Nashville, Tennessee 37203 

6 Schaefer, John F., 475 Riverside Drive, New York, New York 10027 

7 Self, David W., 1200 Davis St., Evanston, Illinois 60201 

8 Smith, Earnest A., 100 Maryland Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 

20002 

9 Spencer, Harry C, 1525 McGavock St., Nashville, Tennessee 37203 

Sec. D, Row 2 

1 Tuttle, Lee F., Lake Junaluska, North Carolina 28745 

2 Van Loon, Thomas J., P. O. Box 871, Nashville, Tennessee 37202 

3 Ward, A. Dudley, 100 Maryland Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 20002 

4 Chambers, Curtis A., P. 0. Box 423, Park Ridge, Illinois 60068 

5 West, Arthur, 601 West Riverview Ave., Dayton, Ohio 45406 

6 Wicke, Myron F., P. O. Box 871, Nashville, Tennessee 37202 

7 Will, Herman, Jr., 100 Maryland Ave., N.E., Washington, D. C. 

20002 

8 Yeakel, Joseph H., 1908 Grand Ave., Nashville, Tennessee 37203 

9 Young, J. Otis, 1661 Northwest Parkway, Park Ridge, Illinois 

60068 

Seated with Conference Delegations 

West Ohio, Calkins, Raoul C, 601 West Riverview Ave., Dayton, Ohio 
45406 

Western N. C, Weldon, Wilson O., 1908 Grand Ave., Nashville, Ten- 
nessee 37203 

Detroit, White, Woodie W., 100 Maryland Ave., N. E., Washington, 
D. C. 20002 

JURISDICTIONAL CONFERENCE SECRETARIES 

Sec. C, Row 2, Seats 8-12 

Ake, Frank W., (Northeastern), 130 West 3rd St., Bloomsburg, 
Pennsylvania 17815 

Guderian, Lawrence, (Western), 1326 Garden St., Bellingham, Wash- 
ington 98225 

Weisshaar, Gilbert, (North Central), 307 Cedar Ave., St. Charles, 
Illinois 60174 

Williams, T. Poe, (South Central), P. O. Box 871, Nashville, Ten- 
nessee 37202 

Wilson, W. Carleton, (Southeastern), Box 10552, Raleigh, North 
Carolina 27605 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF 
DELEGATES 

{Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership. Number indicates the Standing Legislative Com- 
mittee to which each delegate has been assigned by his Annual Con- 
ference delegation.) 

Achberger, Mrs. Clarence E. (M) (11) East Ohio 

Adams, Lloyd S., Jr. (M) (9) Memphis 

Adams, Quenton D. (M) (4) Central Alabama 

Adduro, Pablo M. (M) (1) Northern Philippines 

Adkins, Joel C. (M) (10) South Carolina (1785) 

Adkins, Leon M., Jr., (M) (6) Troy 

Aguilar, Clifford B. (M) (6) Southern California-Arizona 

Ake, Mrs. Frank W. (M) (3) Central Pennsylvania 

Akers, George R. (M) (6) Wyoming 

Alhertson, C. Gene (M) (6) Oregon-Idaho 

Allen, Mrs. James (M) (14) Virginia 

Allin, Willard S. (M) (13) Minnesota 

Allison, John R. (M) (3) Tennessee 

Allison, William F. (M) (5) Missouri East 

Amark, Curt (M) (4) Sweden 

Ammerman, Carl R. (M) (2) Detroit 

Ammons, Edsel A. (M) (1) Northern Illinois 

Anderegg, Miss Joyce (E) (14) Western Pennsylvania 

Anderson, Barry H. (M) (1) North Alabama 

Anderson, Mrs. Virgil (M) (7) Rocky Mountain 

Anderson, Walter F. (M) (5) North Carolina 

Andrews, David H. (E) (11) Baltimore 

Aponte, Ramon (M) (14) New York 

Applegate, William P. (M) (11) Iowa 

Ariki, Joe (M) (10) Rocky Mountain 

Armstrong, Mrs. Robert (M) (3) Iowa 

Arterburn, Mrs. Jane (M) (7) Louisville 

Ault, James M. (M) (6) Northern New Jersey 

Aviiia, Mike (M) (2) Rio Grande 

Baass, Erich M. (M) (12) Northwest Germany 

Babcock, Charles I. (M) (11) Florida 

Babcock, John (M) (4) West Michigan 

Bailey, E. A. (M) (5) North Mississippi 

Bailey, Joe N., Jr. (M) (4) North Mississippi 

Bailey, Wesley (M) (3) Western North Carolina 

Bailey, William P., Jr. (M) (6) Memphis 

Baker, Eric W. (M) (6) Great Britain 

Baker, Leo L. (M) (4) North Texas 

Bane, Mrs. W. V. (M) (9) Central Texas 

Barclift, Chancie D. (M) (13) North Carolina 

Barnes, Ambrose (M) (4) Agra 

Barnes, H. K. (M) (9) North Alabama 

Earnhardt, Mrs. Lurleen G. (M) (1) Western North Carolina 

Barrett, James (M) (12) South Carolina (1785) 

Barto, Reta S. (M) (7) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Barton, Charles A. (M) (5) New York 

Barton, Roy D. (M) (7) Rio Grande 

Bashore, George VF. (E) (5) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Baskerville, M. Trevor (M) (8) Iowa 

Bastain, Miss Mary Lee (M) (5) South Indiana 

116 



The United Methodist Church 117 

Batt, Samuel (E) (5) Northern Illinois 

Bautista, Ignacio P. (M) (7) Philippines 

Bearden, Robert E. L. (M) (14) Little Rock 

Beatty, W. Carroll (M) (12) Baltimore 

Beatty, William M. (M) (2) Western Pennsylvania 

Beebe, William L. (M) (14) Wyoming 

Beeman, Paul J. (M) (13) Pacific Northwest 

Bell, Lester H. (E) (12) Western Pennsylvania 

Bell, Raymond M. (M) (3) Western Pennsylvania 

Bender, Gordon R. (E) (6) Wisconsin 

Benedyktowicz, Witold (M) (14) Poland 

Bengers, Vincent (M) (4) Bombay 

Bergland, John K. (E) (6) West Ohio 

Bertholf , Lloyd M. (M) (4) Central Illinois 

Bethea, Joseph B. (M) (9) Western North Carolina 

Bibay, Francisco A., Jr. (M) (4) Mindanao 

Biddle, Glenn H. (E) (7) West Ohio 

Bingham, Clifford (E) (13) South Indiana 

Bittner, Dwight M. (E) (4) Western Pennsylvania 

Bjork, Virgil V. (M) (6) North Indiana 

Black, Clair W. (Mr.) (M) (4) Northern Nevi^ Jersey 

Blackburn, Alfred B. (M) (13) Florida 

Blackburn, Robert M. (M) (2) Florida 

Blackstone, Franklin, Jr. (M) (11) Western Pennsylvania 

Blake, Bruce P. (M) (2) Kansas West 

Blanchard, Hubert M. (M) (5) Louisiana 

Blessing, Roy E. (E) (8) West Virginia 

Blickenstaff, Thomas (E) (10) Baltimore 

Bobbitt, Pauline (M) (13) Southern California-Arizona 

Boda, Harold L. (E) (3) West Ohio 

Bond, R. H. (M) (5) Memphis 

Bonds, Alfred B. (M) (2) East Ohio 

Booth, Glenn 0. (M) (10) California-Nevada 

Borger, Clarence J. (M) (3) Kansas West 

Born, Mrs. Harry E. (M) (7) Virginia 

Bosley, Harold A. (M) (1) New York 

Boswell, Hamilton T. (M) (7) California-Nevada 

Bott, LeRoy A. (E) (7) Kansas West 

Boyd, Marvin L. (M) (6) Northwest Texas 

Boyer, Gene (E) (10) East Ohio 

Bozeman, W. Scott (M) (3) Florida 

Brabham, A. McKay (M) (9) South Carolina (1785) 

Bramlett, Sam C. (M) (13) Texas 

Brandyberry, Abraham L. (E) (13) East Ohio 

Braun, Mrs. Paul (E) (10) Iowa 

Brawn, Melvin (E) (5) California-Nevada 

Bray, Jerry G. (M) (2) Virginia 

Brewer, Otho G., Jr. (M) (13) Peninsula 

Bridges, Ramsey (M) (6) West Virginia 

Bright, William E. (M) (14) Detroit 

Bristah, James W. (M) (1) Detroit 

Bristow, Carroll D. (M) (13) Baltimore 

Brogdon, Mrs. Elizabeth S. (M) (7) Southern New Jersey 

Brooks, David W. (M) (7) North Georgia 

Brown, Allen L. (M) (13) Louisiana 

Brown, Rainsford A. (M) (8) Iowa 

Brown, William E. (M) (3) New York 

Bruce, S. Duane (M) (2) Northwest Texas 

Bryan, Monk (M) (7) Missouri East 

Bryant, Thomas (M) (2) South Indiana 



118 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Bumpers, E. Clay (M) (4) North Arkansas 

Burns, Alden B. (M) (3) West Michigan 

Burrous, Kermit (M) (9) North Indiana 

Burrous, Mrs. Anita (M) (7) Noi-th Indiana 

Burtner, Robert W. (M) (11) Oregon-Idaho 

Butler, Handle (M) (7) New Mexico 

Buttimer, Thomas A. (M) (6) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Buttrey, D. Roscoe (M) (10) Tennessee 

Byler, Robert A. (M) (13) West Ohio 

Byrd, William O. (M) (11) Rocky Mountain 

Cabrera, Ismael (M) (4) Puerto Rico 

Cagna, Mrs. Betty (M) (9) Missouri West 

Cain, Mrs. James S. (M) (1) Western Pennsylvania 

Cain, Richard W. (M) (2) Southern California- Arizona 

Calbert, Wavne F. (M) (4) Mississippi (FCJ) 

Caldwell, Gilbert H., Jr. (M) (2) Southern New England 

Calkins, Raoul C. (M) (3) West Ohio 

Campbell, Foy (M) (12) Alabama-West Florida 

Carlsen, Eigil (M) (11) Denmark 

Carlson, Verner A. (E) (8) North Indiana 

Carlton, Gordon B. (M) (12) Little Rock 

Carr, Marvin H. (M) (7) West Virginia 

Carraway, James L. (M) (8) Western Pennsylvania 

Carrell, Olivia (M) (14) California-Nevada 

Carrington, John E. (M) (13) New York 

Carroll, Edward G. (M) (2) Baltimore 

Carruth, Mrs. Carlton (M) (11) South Georgia 

Carson, Joseph T., Jr. (M) (10) Virginia 

Carter, Earl B. (M) (3) North Arkansas 

Carver, Donald L. (M) (14) Iowa 

Casad, Gordon D. (M) (10) North Texas 

Caswell, Bervin O. (M) (6) New Mexico 

Catterall, Grace (M) (13) California-Nevada 

Chadwick, Mrs. Dorothy (M) (13) Western Pennsylvania 

Chaffee, Paul (M) (9) Western Pennsylvania 

Chapman, Dr. A. Frank (M) (12) Peninsula 

Charan, Miss Sophie (M) (7) Lucknow 

Chawhan, Jayanand I. (M) Gujarat 

Cheji, Peter F. (M) (7) Southern California- Arizona 

Chiles, Paul D. (M) (8) West Ohio 

Chitnis, Vinubhai W. (M) Gujarat 

Chittum, John (M) (9) East Ohio 

Choy, Wilbur W. (M) (12) California-Nevada 

Christianson, Lyle T. (M) (7) Minnesota 

Clark, Alva H. (M) (7) Nebraska 

Clark, Mrs. Lamar (M) (6) Texas 

Clay, Willie B. (M) (6) Northern Illinois 

Clem, Paul L. (M) (3) North Alabama 

Cleveland, Millard C. (M) (10) Florida 

Clymer, Merritt (E) (8) East Ohio 

Cochran, James D. (M) (4) Detroit 

Cochrun, Edgar (E) (13) West Ohio 

Cockerille, Miss Clara (M) (10) Western Pennsylvania 

Codding, Charles, Jr. (M) (9) Oklahoma 

Coffin, Wayne W. (M) (6) Oklahoma 

Coffman, Floyd H. (M) (2) Kansas East 

Colaw, Emerson S. (M) (5) West Ohio 

Cole, Calvin H. (E) (13) Central Pennsylvania 

Coleman, Harry (M) (14) West Virginia 



The United Methodist Church 119 

Collins, Claude R. (M) (1) West Virginia 

Collins, Mabel E. (M) (9) New York 

Colpitis, A. Hunter (E) (6) North Indiana 

Colpitts, Mrs. A. Hunter (E) (14) North Indiana 

Cooke, George W. (M) (1) Western New York 

Cooke, Jack (M) (8) Louisiana 

Cooke, Mrs. Monroe (M) (1) East Ohio 

Cooke, R. Jervis (M) (7) Peninsula 

Cooper, Earle N. (M) (12) Troy 

Cooper, Joel A. (M) (6) North Arkanasa 

Cooper, Kenneth (M) (1) Alabama-West Florida 

Carry, John G. (M) (6) Tennessee 

Cotton, William Davis (M) (2) Louisiana 

Cotto-T homer, Alfredo (M) (10) New York 

Courtney, Robert H. (M) (5) East Ohio 

Cox, Miss Sarah (M) (1) West Ohio 

Crain, Dight W. (M) (4) Southern New England 

Crawford, Gene P. (E) (8) South Indiana 

Creel, John (M) (8) Alabama- West Florida 

Cromwell, Thomas L. (M) (13) East Ohio 

Crutchfield, Finis A. (M) (6) Oklahoma 

Cuaresma, Consuelo 0. (M) (3) Southern California-Arizona 

Cuff, G. Wayne (M) (1) Peninsula 

Culp, Jesse A. (M) (5) North Alabama 

Cummings, Mrs. C. C. (M) (7) Northern Illinois 

Cummins, Marlene (M) (7) Southern Illinois 

Current, Gloster C. (M) (1) New York 

Curtis, Mrs. Albert (M) (5) Central New York 

Curtis, Myers B. (M) (2) North Arkansas 

Cushman, Robert E. (M) (6) North Carolina 

Dailey, Charles M. (M) (3) East Ohio 

Danforth, Merrill A. (M) (2) Maine 

Darling, Howard H. (M) (8) New York 

Darrow, Frederick M. (deceased) Central New York 

Dass, Christopher S. (M) (6) Lucknow 

Daugherty, Ruth M. (E) (13) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Davenport, Mrs. E. T. (M) (7) Little Rock 

Davis, Carlos W. (M) (5) Texas 

Davis, George (E) (1) North Indiana 

Davis, Hooker D. (M) (1) Southern New Jersey 

Davis, Paul (M) (12) Central Illinois 

Davis, Sidney E. (E) (10) Missouri West 

Dayal, Dr. Christo D. (M) (10) Moradabad 

Decker, Mrs. E. Moore (M) (10) Texas 

de Freitas, Antonio Filipe (M) (11) Angola 

Dekle, Joe B. (M) (4) North Georgia 

DeLong, Dale F. (E) (4) West Ohio 

Dement, Frank E., Jr. (M) (8) Mississippi 

Dennis, Charles C, Sr. (M) (4) Liberia 

Dennis, Gordon (M) (3) Central Texas 

Detty, Darrell (E) (5) West Ohio 

Devadanam, H. M. (M) (4) South India 

DeVaux, Mrs. Thomas (E) (4) Western Pennsylvania 

DeWitt, Jesse R. (M) (2) Detroit 

Dickerson, Ellis R. (M) (13) Alabama-West Florida 

Dickhaut, Walter R., Sr. (M) (6) West Ohio 

Dille, Robert E. (E) (3) West Virginia 

Dixon, Ernest T. (M) (6) Southwest Texas 

Dodder, Robert T. (M) (7) Iowa 



120 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Dodge, Carlton S. (E) (3) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Dodson, Thurman L. (M) (2) Baltimore 

Doenges, William C. (M) (4) Oklahoma 

Doering, Martin (M) (4) West Berlin 

Doggett, Herbert L. D. (M) (1) Baltimore 

Doggett, John N., Jr. (M) (1) Missouri East 

Dolliver, James (M) (1) Pacific Northwest 

Dotts, Ted J. (M) (14) Northwest Texas 

Douglass, Carl H., Jr. (M) (6) Virginia 

Downie, Dr. Gerald (M) (10) Central Illinois 

Drennan, Merrill W. (M) (12) Baltimore 

Drinkard, Eugene T. (M) (14) North Georgia 

Droke, Clifford S. (M) (9) California-Nevada 

Duck, David A. (M) (5) South Georgia 

Dudley, E. M. (M) Western North Carolina 

Duffey, Paul A. (M) (11) Alabama- West Florida 

Duncan, Edward L. (M) (5) Detroit 

Dunlap, G. Alan (M) (1) Nebraska 

Dunn, Merle A. (E) (2) Minnesota 

Dunn, Mrs. Sam A. (M) (14) North Carolina 

Dutt, Harold (E) (12) West Ohio 

Early, Joyce V. (M) (8) North Carolina 

Easley, John (E) (1) South Indiana 

Easter, Paul M. (M) (13) Western Pennsylvania 

Eaton, Harry B. (M) (3) Virginia 

Eberly, Edwin P. (E) (8) East Ohio 

Eby, Mrs. Norma (M) (7) Pacific Northwest 

Eckel, Sherman B. (E) (8) Western New York 

Eckstein, D. D. Herbert (E) (1) West Berlin 

Edgar, Charles E. (M) (4) Central Pennsylvania 

Edgar, Thomas A. (M) (8) North Alabama 

Egan, Jim A. (M) (1) Oklahoma 

Egger, Kirk (M) (7) North Mississippi 

Eich, Foster (M) (10) Alabama- West Florida 

Eldridge, Edgar A. (M) (3) Holston 

Ellis, Edwin L. (M) (1) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ellis, Matt L. (M) (1) North Arkansas 

Ellis, S. Blake (M) (6) Maine 

Emerson, Joe G. (M) (7) South Indiana 

Engel, Damon L. (M) (9) West Virginia 

Enke, Karl-Heinz (E) (5) 

Annual Conf. of German Democratic Rep. 

Entler, Fred P. (M) (12) Holston 

Epps, Anderson C. (M) (6) Georgia 

Espie, John C. (M) (4) Minnesota 

Eutsler, R. Kern (M) (1) Virginia 

Evans, Daniel F. (M) (12) South Indiana 

Evatt, Parker (M) (1) South Carolina (1785) 

Everhart, Mrs. Frank B. (M) (12) West Virginia 

Fabian, Pedro F. (M) (4) Northern Philippines 

Fagan, Harold (M) (4) Texas 

Fanning, O. B. (M) (9) Florida 

Fant, Glenn (M) (2) North Mississippi 

Farley, Thomas K. (M) (1) Southern California-Arizona 

Faust, Carl W. (E) (5) Iowa 

Featherston, R. Jack (M) (5) Oklahoma 

Fechtig, Norman (E) (3) Southern Illinois 

Fenn, G. Lemuel (M) (13) Oklahoma 



The United Methodist Church 121 

Fereira Dias, Nobre Pereira (M) (1) Angola 

Ferris, Mrs. E. L. (M) (2) Nebraska 

Fetterman, Brian A. (M) (6) Central Pennsylvania 

Fichter, Joseph W. (M) (11) West Ohio 

Fields, Mrs. Louis H. (M) (5) Kentucky 

Fink, Harold H. (M) (13) Virginia 

Finkbeiner, Melvin M. (M) (2) Pacific Northwest 

Firestone, Lyman (M) (2) Missouri West 

Fischer, Dr. Heinz P. (M) (1) South Germany 

Fishbeck, Royal B., Jr. (M) (13) Troy 

Fisher, Albert F. (M) (2) North Carolina 

Fisher, Harry J. (E) (8) Western Pennsylvania 

Fisher, J. Herschel (M) (5) North Texas 

Fisher, James A., Sr. (M) (3) Memphis 

Flinchbaugh, James E. (E) (6) West Ohio 

Fogleman, C. M., Jr. (M) (5) Kansas West 

Forbes, J. Kenneth (M) (2) South Indiana 

Ford, Edwin C. (M) (13) Western North Carolina 

Ford, Floyd (M) (7) Tennessee 

Ford, Frank B. (M) (13) New Mexico 

Foster, George A. (M) (14) Florida 

Fowler, H. Thornton (M) (9) Tennessee 

Franklin, Denson N. (M) (9) North Alabama 

Freeman, G. Ross (M) (13) South Georgia 

Frey, John H. (M) (9) Nebraska 

Fribley, Robert W. (M) (Resigned) North Indiana 

Fridy, Wallace (M) (6) South Carolina (1785) 

Froe, D. W. (M) (10) West Virginia 

Fulbright, Homer H. (M) (5) North Arkansas 

Fulk, Floyd L. (E) (5) Virginia 

Gailey, Mrs. Beulah (M) (7) Missouri West 

Galbreath, Mrs. Charles (M) (13) Central Illinois 

Galloway, Benedict A. (M) (11) Louisiana 

Galvan, Elias G. (M) (12) Southern California-Arizona 

Gantz, Richard (M) (7) Central Illinois 

Garrett, C. Deiidy (M) (3) Iowa 

Garrick, Grier L. (M) (4) North Carolina 

Garrison, R. Benjamin (M) (11) Central Illinois 

Gates, Merrill (E) (3) Northern Illinois 

Gathings, Ervin M. (M) (14) North Texas 

Gausdal, Hans (M) (4) Norway 

Geible, Merrell D. (E) (3) North Indiana 

Geissbuhler, Theo (E) (13) Switzerland (E) 

Gentry, Edd W. (M) (8) Florida 

Gibson, J. Nelson (M) (7) North Carolina 

Gilbert, Ronald W. (M) (12) Oklahoma 

Gilmore, Paul G. (E) (9) Central Pennsylvania 

Gilts, George (E) (13) West Ohio 

Glasgow, Francis M. (M) (4) East Ohio 

Goens, Ray W. (M) (2) Texas 

Gotz, Herbert (M) (6) ... Annual Conf. of German Democratic Rep. 

Good, Mary (M) (8) Detroit 

Goodrich, Robert E., Jr. (M) (9) North Texas 

Goodwin, Burnie C., Jr. (M) (2) New Mexico 

Gordon, Harry M. (M) (4) Wyoming 

Gordon, Mrs. John W. (M) (11) North Alabama 

Graham, John H. (M) (6) Upper Mississippi 

Graham, Joseph R. (E) (10) West Ohio 

Grant, Nicholas W. (M) (13) North Carolina 



122 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Gray, C. Jarrett, Sr. (M) (5) Missouri West 

Gray, Mrs. Ethel M. (M) (7) Florida 

Green, Mrs. Robert E. (M) (9) South Indiana 

Greene, Horace H. (M) (6) Kentucky 

Greenhaw, Frank (M) (13) North Texas 

Greenwaldt, William M. (M) (6) Central Texas 

Grenfell, John N., Jr. (M) (12) Detroit 

Gridley, Dorothy R. (M) (3) Minnesota 

Grogan, Roy J. (M) (2) Central Texas 

Grove, William B. (M) (11) Western Pennsylvania 

Gsell, Theophil H. (M) (4) Switzerland (M) 

Guiang, Condrado G. (M) (5) Mindanao 

Gundlach, Mrs. Elizabeth B. (M) (4) Western New York 

Gurtner, Miss Charlotte (M) (3) Central Illinois 

Gtistafson, Laveme H. (E) (5) Southern California- Arizona 

Gwyer, Herbert L. (M) (9) Western Pennsylvania 

Hager, Cornelius R. (M) (3) Kentucky 

Hagiya, Paul H. (M) (1) Rocky Mountain 

Hagood, Delma L. (M) (5) North Georgia 

Haining, Kathleen L. (M) (14) Minnesota 

Hall, Carl C. (M) (2) Little Rock 

Hall, E. William (M) (13) Baltimore 

Hamilton, Richard E. (M) (3) South Indiana 

Hamilton, Ronald R. (M) (9) Rocky Mountain 

Hampton, Mrs. Mary (M) (1) Missouri West 

Hancock, Maurice M. (M) (4) Peninsula 

Hand, Don J. (M) (4) Southwest Texas 

Handy, W. T., Jr. {M.) (6) Louisiana 

Hanks, Stanley G. (M) (9) Minnesota 

Hann, Edwin F., Jr. (M) (8) Southern New Jersey 

Hann, Paul M. (M) (9) Iowa 

Hanna, Mrs. Ellen (M) (1) Central Illinois 

Hardcastle, James C. (M) (3) Peninsula 

Hardin, Granville N. (M) (14) West Ohio 

Harding, Joe A. (M) (14) Pacific Northwest 

Hardt, John W. (M) (6) Texas 

Harkness, Georgia (M) (1) Southern California- Arizona 

Harkness, Leonard L. (M) (5) Minnesota 

Harper, John R. (M) (14) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Harriefeld, Fritz (E) (11) Northwest Germany 

Harriger, Harold 0. (M) (1) Northwest Texas 

Harrington, Richard W. (M) (6) Western New York 

Harrington, Robert F. (M) (12) Louisiana 

Harrington, Mrs. Wayne W. (M) (11) Nebraska 

Harris, Justin N. (M) (5) Bombay 

Hartman, Tom (M) (14) Kansas West 

Hartz, Mrs. Paul (M) (11) Virginia 

Havemann, Gerhard (E) (13) 

Annual Conf. of German Democratic Rep. 

Hawkins, J. Clinton (M) (4) Missouri East 

Hawkins, Donald (M) (4) West Ohio 

Hayes, Clare J. (M) (3) Kansas East 

Hayes, Melvin (E) (10) East Ohio 

Hay ward, C. Douglas (M) (6) California-Nevada 

Heacock, Jack D. (M) (11) Southwest Texas 

Heckard, Cecil L. (M) (11) Western North Carolina 

Hedberg, Al A. (M) (7) Florida 

Heisel, Eldred B. (E) (4) West Ohio 

Helms, Mrs. Roy (M) (7) North Indiana 



The United Methodist Church 123 

Henderson, Mrs. Henry (M) (10) West Ohio 

Henderson, William R. (M) (1) Western North Carolina 

Henderson, Zach S. (M) (9) South Georgia 

Henry, William R. (M) (1) Oklahoma 

Hermann, Dr. Erich (E) (13) Southwest Germany 

Hess, Wayne C. (E) (8) Central Illinois 

Heyde, Forest R. (E) (4) North Indiana 

Hickerson, Walter J. (M) (8) Kansas West 

Hicks, Kenneth W. (M) (13) Nebraska 

High, Henry R. (M) (8) West Virginia 

Hildehrand, Will M. (M) (4) Southern California-Arizona 

Hildreth, Charles H. (M) (6) Alabama- West Florida 

Hines, Mrs. Thelma (E) (7) Kansas East 

Hinz, Lawrence (E) (resigned) Wisconsin 

Hitchock, William C. (M) (4) Detroit 

Hjelte, Marshall C. (M) (10) Pacific Northwest 

Hodapp, Leroy C. (M) (1) South Indiana 

Hoffman, Mrs. Richard (M) (3) West Virginia 

Holbrook, Donald E. (M) (2) West Michigan 

Holland, Mrs. Betty Lou (M) (1) Northern New Jersey 

Hollis, Robert R. (M) (6) Southern Illinois 

Holmes, Zan W., Jr. (M) (3) North Texas 

Holter, Don W. (M) (6) Kansas East 

Homer, Robert L. (M) (2) Central New York 

Hood, Esther (M) (7) Yellowstone 

Hood, Robin P. (M) (2) Western North Carolina 

Hook, Ralph C, Jr. (M) (4) Southern California-Arizona 

Hoopert, Grantas E. (M) (14) Central Pennsylvania 

Hoover, J. Jeffrey (M) (14) Iowa 

Hopkins, Martin W. (M) (3) Central Pennsylvania 

Hopkins, Mrs. Thomas J. (M) (7) Central Pennsylvania 

Horton, Robert E. (E) (13) Detroit 

Hostetter, Mark J. (E) (2) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hottle, Darrell (M) (2) West Ohio 

Houston, Jamie G. (M) (13) North Mississippi 

Howe, Mrs, Clarice (M) (5) Northern New Jersey 

Howe, Robert C. (M) (7) Western Pennsylvania 

Howell, Maggart B. (M) (5) Central Texas 

Howes, John B. (M) (6) Central Pennsylvania 

Hozendorf, C. Ray (M) (9) Little Rock 

Hughes, Harold H. (M) (7) Virginia 

Hughlett, William S. (M) (10) Florida 

Hulit, Kenneth W. (E) (2) East Ohio 

Humphrey, John D., Sr. (M) (3) North Mississippi 

Humphrey, L. A., Jr. (M) (8) Texas 

Hundley, Mrs. Frances (M) (12) Wisconsin 

Hundley, George R. (M) (12) North Alabama 

Hunt, Kenneth W. (M) (1) West Ohio 

Huston, Ralph B. (M) (6) Florida 

Hutchinson, Charles L. (M) (7) Central Alabama 

Hutchinson, Mildred (M) (11) Southern California- Arizona 

Hyatt, Carl B. (M) (4) Western North Carolina 

Hyatt, Lochlan L. (M) (8) South Carolina (1785) 

Iwig, James H. (E) (1) Kansas West 

Jacobs, Harry H., Jr. (E) (12) Central Pennsylvania 

James, William E. (M) (3) Louisville 

James, William M. (M) (2) New York 

Jarvis, Charles S. (M) (2) Northern lUinois 



124 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Jason, William C, Jr. (M) (12) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Jefferson, A. G. (M) (12) Virginia 

Jenkins, H. James (M) (2) Oregon-Idaho 

Jenkins, Tom (M) (4) Louisville 

Jenkins, Warren M. (M) (9) South Carolina (1866) 

Jerome, J. E. (M) (5) South Carolina (1785) 

Jetter, Richard (E) (9) South Germany 

Johansen, Frede (M) (4) Denmark 

Johnson, Harry L., II (M) (8) Southern New England 

Johnson, Joseph T. (M) (3) Northern Illinois 

Johnson, Richard E. (M) (11) Kansas East 

Johnson, Richard O. (M) (3) California-Nevada 

Johnston, Kenneth C. (M) (3) Missouri West 

Jones, Bevel (M) (7) North Georgia 

Jones, Everett (M) (1) Baltimore 

Jones, George E. (M) (9) Mississippi 

Jones, Gerald H. (M) (2) North Indiana 

Jones, John B. (M) (4) Baltimore 

Jones, Phil M. (M) (5) South Carolina (1785) 

Jordan, Bert (M) (5) Mississippi 

Jordan, Roy M. (M) (4) Alabama-West Florida 

Kadenge, Fannuel (M) (13) Rhodesia 

Kalaf, Walter N. (M) (11) Florida 

Kaputo, Elie M. (M) (11) Southern Congo 

Karls, Harold M. (M) (1) Detroit 

Kay, W. Eugene (E) (10) Oklahoma 

Keejfe, Williayn R. (M) (13) New Hampshire 

Kellam, Harold B. (M) (4) Virginia 

Kellaway, John W. (M) (4) Great Britain 

Keller, Alfred L. (E) (5) North Indiana 

Kelley, Robert W. {U) (6) East Ohio 

Kellow, M. Keith (M) (9) Texas 

Kemper, John Q. (M) (1) Kentucky 

Kent, Harry R. (M) (4) South Carolina (1785) 

Kerber, Phil (M) (1) Iowa 

Kesler, N. Robert (M) (14) Southern California-Arizona 

Key, W. R. (M) (10) South Georgia 

Kim, Thomas K. (M) (3) Northwest Texas 

Kimbrough, R. Edwin (M) (2) North Alabama 

King, Arnold K. (M) (10) North Carolina 

King, Mrs. Mary E. (M) (11) Western North Carolina 

King, John T. (M) (3) Southwest Texas 

Kirchner, Frederick K. (M) (11) Troy 

Kleszczynski, Adam (M) (3) Poland 

Knecht, David F. (M) (5) North Dakota 

Knox, James L. (M) (1) Florida 

Knupp, Robert E. (M) (5) Central Pennsylvania 

Koenig, Robert W. (E) (11) South Indiana 

Kreager, Max W. (M) (9) Iowa 

Krueger, Delton H. (M) (11) Minnesota 

Kruse, Lowen V. (M) (3) Nebraska 

Kuehl, Werner E. (M) (11) Northwest Germany 

Lagawo, Richard E. S. (E) (4) Sierra Leone 

Lai, James (M) (11) Delhi 

Lamb, Raymond R. (M) (6) Detroit 

Lamb, Mrs. Wayne A. (M) (7) Memphis 

Lang, Francis (M) (7) East Ohio 

Lanning, Dean A. (M) (3) Northern New Jersey 



The United Methodist Church 125 

Laraba, Forest W. (M) (2) New Hampshire 

Larson, Gunnar E. ( M ) ( 5 ) Sweden 

Lash, H. Donald (E) (14) "Western Pennsylvania 

Lashford, Mrs. Edgar J. (M) (7) Wyoming 

LaSuer, Donald F. (M) (13) North Indiana 

Latta, Lloijd A. (M) (10) Iowa 

Lau, Clifford (M) (13) Wisconsin 

Ledbetter, M. C. (M) (4) Northwest Texas 

Lee, Ernest W. (M) (2) Southern New Jersey 

Lee, Vernon (M) (3) Northern New York 

Leggett, John W., Jr. (M) (6) Mississippi 

Lennartson, Walter (M) (4) Northern Illinois 

Leonard, Mrs. James M. (M) (11) West Ohio 

Lesher, Mrs. Rosalind M. (E) (3) Western New York 

Lester, W. D. (M) (9) Southwest 

Lewis, W. Robert (M) (1) North Alabama 

Lewis, William B. (M) (14) Southern Illinois 

Lightner, A. LeRoy (M) (2) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Lightner, George S. (M) (8) Virginia 

Lindgren, Alvin J. (M) (2) Wisconsin 

Lindquist, Harold V. (E) (5) Western Pennsylvania 

Lindseij, Julian A. (M) (10) Western North Carolma 

Linhoss, John C. (E) (7) Virginia 

Little, Mrs. Alvirita (M) (3) Pacific Northwest 

Litton, Ray (M) (4) Kentucky 

Llenado, Abigael C. (M) ( ) Middle Philippines 

Long, Carroll H. (M) (10) Holston 

Long, Maurice K. (M) (4) • . Iowa 

Love, Elza L. (M) (13) Texas 

Lovern, J. Chess (M) (7) Oklahoma 

Lowe, Donald L. (M) (2) Southern Illinois 

Loyd, H. Brown (M) (8) Central Texas 

Loyd, Harold W. (M) (6) Central Illinois 

Lundy, John T. (M) (7) Holston 

Lundy, Robert F. (M) (11) Holston 

Lusby, L. D. (E) (9) Holston 

Lutrick, Charles E. (M) (13) Northwest Texas 

Mack, James (M) (3) South Carolina (1866) 

MacKay, James (M) (8) North Georgia 

Madison, J. Clay (M) (8) Western North Carolina 

Madsen, Arnold (M) (5) Norway 

Mahon, Eldon B. (M) (1) Central Texas 

Majors, R. Powell (M) (8) Western North Carolina 

Malac, Vlastislav (M) (13) Czechoslovakia 

Mangum, Mrs. Orien (M) (11) Peninsula 

Mann, Charles L. (M) (8) Baltimore 

Mann, Mrs. Harold L. (M) (2) North Carolina 

Mann, Robert (M) (1) Central New York 

Mann, Robert T. (M) (12) Florida 

Mannasmith, Dr. Clarence H. (M) (12) Iowa 

Manns, Herbert (M) (13) West Berlin 

Marandi, Emmanuel (M) (4) Bengal 

Marima, William (M) (4) Rhodesia 

Marlow, H. Leroy (E) (10) Central Pennsylvania 

Martin, George W. (M) (6) Little Rock 

Martin, Gordon (M) (8) Southern California- Arizona 

Martin, Paul D., Jr. (M) (8) Virginia 

Marvin, John E. (M) (11) Detroit 

Massey, Daniel B. (M) (6) Moradabad 



126 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Matheny, Robert M. (M) (3) Mississippi 

Matheny, Thomas H. (M) (1) Louisiana 

Matthaei, Marjorie (M) (9) Kansas West 

Matthew, Glenn E. (M) (6) Kansas West 

Matthews, Mrs. Cecil R. (M) (7) Northwest Texas 

Mayer, Paul O. (M) (7) East Ohio 

Mayes, Allen M. (M) (8) Texas 

Mayo, George W. (M) (8) South Georgia 

Mays, Avery (M) (7) North Texas 

McAdams, Charles K. (M) (3) North Carolina 

McCall, Kenneth A. (M) (13) Missouri West 

McCartt, James S. (M) (5) Holston 

McCleskey, Wayne H. (M) (7) Texas 

McCommons, Mrs. R. M. (M) (13) North Georgia 

McCoy, Paul E. (M) (6) Peninsula 

McCullough, Mrs. Ralph (M) (7) Missouri East 

McCune, Robert J. (M) (6) Central New York 

McDavid, Harry E. (M) (7) Alabama-West Florida 

McDavid, Joel D. (M) (3) Alabama-West Florida 

McDonald, Charles P. (M) (7) North Arkansas 

McGowan, Mrs. Charles B. (M) (7) Louisiana 

Mcintosh, Mrs. Hilda (M) (13) Kansas East 

McKenzie, Leon T. (M) (9) Southern California- Arizona 

McMillan, Mrs. Norris (M) (13) Southwest Texas 

McRae, Frank L. (M) (1) Memphis 

Meadows, William A. (M) (5) Florida 

Meinhardt, Lydia (E) (7) West Berlin 

Melgren, Wesley A. (E) (8) Minnesota 

Meliiis, Arthur R. (M) (1) Troy 

Mendigorin, Abdon (M) (12) Philippines 

Mentzer, Warren F. (E) (11) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Mercer, Charles H. (M) (1) North Carolina 

Merrow, Arthur S. (M) (2) Western New York 

Messmer, William K. (E) (9) West Ohio 

Metcalf, Kenneth E. (M) (5) Iowa 

Metzel, Mrs. George V. (M) (7) Oklahoma 

Meuschke, Paul J. (M) (6) Western Pennsylvania 

Michelmann, Heinrich (M) (1) Southwest Germany 

Mielke, Mrs. Sharon (E) (11) Wisconsin 

Mikkelsen, John H. (M) (12) Nebraska 

Miles, Denver L. (E) (2) West Virginia 

Miller, Isaac H. (M) (3) Western North Carolina 

Millet, Edmund A. W. (M) (7) Western New York 

Modisher, Donald E. (M) (5) Western New York 

Moeller, Romane G. (E) (2) Rocky Mountain 

Mossinger, Manfred (E) (5) Southwest Germany 

Momberg, Paul B. (M) (8) West Ohio 

Montgomery, Allen D. (M) (7) North Alabama 

Montgomery, Edward (M) (4) North Alabama 

Montgomery, John C, Jr. (M) (9) Missouri East 

Moody, C. LeGrande, Jr. (M) (13) South Carolina (1785) 

Moon, Robert W. (M) (1) California-Nevada 

Moore, Eugene J. (E) (2) Central Illinois 

Moore, John V. (M) (11) California-Nevada 

Moore, LeRoy W. (M) (11) Iowa 

Moore, Lester L. (M) (1) Iowa 

Moore, Manly M. (M) (8) Oklahoma 

Moore, Ray (M) (10) North Georgia 



The United Methodist Church 127 

Moore, Richard V. (M) (3) Florida 

Moore, Thomas P. (E) (4) East Ohio 

Moorhead, Edwin E. (M) (4) Mississippi 

Moorhead, Frank (M) (6) North Georgia 

Morgan, Robert C. (M) (13) North Alabama 

Morrison, Mrs. Mary (M) (4) Western North Carolina 

Morton, Mrs. C. (M) (7) Texas 

Muelder, Walter G. (M) (3) Southern New England 

Muller, Walter W. (E) (9) Central Illinois 

Mullick, Pravash R. (M) (1) Bengal 

Murray, Jerry D. (M) (2) Western North Carolina 

Museu, Emile (M) ( ) Central Congo 

Muteteke, Paul (M) (3) Southern Congo 

Myers, Calvin R. (M) (14) East Ohio 

Myers, David L, (M) (5) Southern California-Arizona 

Myers, Paul E. (M) (13) Central Pennsylvania 

Myers, T. Cecil (M) (3) North Georgia 

Naff, George E. (M) (7) Holston 

Naylor, E, R. (M) (4) Rocky Mountain 

Nees, Forrest G. (M) (11) East Ohio 

Neese, William J. (M) (6) North Carolina 

Nelson, J. R. (M) (3) East Ohio 

Nestler, Frank H. (M) (2) Central Illinois 

Netterville, G. Leon (M) (4) Louisiana 

Newman, Mrs. Harold (M) (7) West Michigan 

Newman, M. Douglas (M) (6) Virginia 

Newton, C. D. S. (M) (13) Delhi 

Ngoi, Maurice (M) (3) North Katanga 

Nichols, Frank A. (M) (6) Iowa 

Nichols, Henry H. (M) (9) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Nicholson, R. Herman (M) (6) Western North Carolina 

Norris, Irene (M) (7) Detroit 

North, Jack B. (M) (14) Central Illinois 

Northfelt, Merlyn W. (M) (6) Northern Illinois 

Northrop, George M. (M) (12) New York 

Obaugh, William R. (E) (4) Florida 

Odom, Warren G. (M) (3) Central New York 

Oehler, Mrs. Jack (E) (14) Northern Illinois 

Ogden, Mrs. Selma (M) (5) Troy 

O'Hara, Delmar T, (M) (12) East Ohio 

Oliphint, Benjamin R. (M) (3) Louisiana 

Ortman, Ervin (M) (7) South Dakota 

Osborn, John F. (E) (2) West Ohio 

Otwell, William (M) (7) Southern California-Arizona 

Outler, Albert C. (M) (1) North Texas 

Owens, J. Garfield (M) (7) Southwest Texas 

Page, Carlos C. (M) (13) West Michigan 

Page, S. Covey (M) (5) Oklahoma 

Paige, Mrs. Jean (M) (11) ' West Virginia 

Palomo, Luis Fernando (M) Costa Rica 

Parker, Richard S. (M) (11) New York 

Parker, Robert P. (M) (12) Virginia 

Parker, Mrs. W. Roy (M) (7) South Carolina (1785) 

Patrick, James T. (M) (4) North Carolina 

Patton, Luther A. (M) (7) Troy 

Patton, Russell R. (M) (13) Kentucky 

Paxton, James R. (M) (12) Texas 



128 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Penicela, Almeida (M) ( ) Southeast Africa 

Persons, William R. (M) (6) Rocky Mountain 

Peter, M. Ella (M) (7) Hyderabad 

Peter, Victor (M) (1) Madhya Pradesh 

Peters, Dr. C. Kenneth (M) (5) Louisville 

Peters, James C. (M) (9) Western North Carolina 

Peters, Lloyd A. (M) (3) Oklahoma 

Peterson, Arden M. (E) (5) West Michigan 

Petteway, Warren B. (M) (9) North Carolina 

Pevahouse, Joseph N. (M) (4) Memphis 

Pfaltzgraff, Richard C. (E) (13) Iowa 

Pfeiffer, Mrs. A. B. (M) (11) Northern Illinois 

Phillips, Randall C. (M) (11) Southern California- Arizona 

Pitcher, Dale E. (M) (5) Central Illinois 

Pitcher, Philip N. (M) (2) Wyoming 

Pittenger, Richard (M) (1) South Dakota 

Plummer, Kenneth H. (M) (4) Central Pennsylvania 

Pohl, Keith I. (M) (11) West Michigan 

Poor, George L. (M) (5) Pacific Northwest 

Pope, H. David, Jr. (M) (14) Texas 

Poppe, Odin W. (E) (4) Nebraska 

Potter, Truman W. (M) (5) West Virginia 

Potthoff, Harvey H. (M) (3) Rocky Mountain 

Praetorius, Herman R. (E) (4) Pacific Northwest 

Presley, I. P. (M) (4) Upper Mississippi 

Preston, Alice (M) (3) Southwest 

Preusch, Robert W. (M) (2) New York 

Price, Robert R. (M) (3) Oklahoma 

Prigmore, L. T. (M) (5) Holston 

Prince, Frank H. (M) (1) North Georgia 

Purdham, Charles B. (M) (6) Minnesota 

Purdy, Burt (M) (14) North Alabama 

Purnell, Eric C. (M) (7) Central Texas 

Quickel, Harold H. (E) (8) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ragland, James (M) (3) Detroit 

Ragsdale, Mrs. J. B. (M) (13) Holston 

Rainwater, Henry M. (M) (10) North Arkansas 

Ramer, Lloyd W. (M) (13) Memphis 

Randolph, Allan H. L. (M) (2) Louisville 

Rayidolph, Willie B. (M) (3) Texas 

Raoji, Ashok K. (M) (4) Madhya Pradesh 

Reavley, Tom (M) (1) Southwest Texas 

Redding, Mrs. Viola (M) (7) Western North Carolina 

Redmond, Charles D. (E) (12) West Ohio 

Redstone, Ray L. (M) (2) Florida 

Reeves, Richard E. (M) (14) Central Illinois 

Reitz, T. Russell (M) (5) Kansas East 

Renich, Paul W. (M) (12) Kansas West 

Revels, Percy B. (M) (1) Florida 

Rice, George E. (M) (14) South Indiana 

Rice, Spencer M. (M) (11) South Carolina (1785) 

Richards, Cecil T. (M) (6) North India 

Richardson, Ted L (M) (9) Southwest Texas 

Richer, Ben (E) (14) West Ohio 

Richer, George M. (M) (5) Southwest Texas 

Riddick, Roland P. (M) (2) Virginia 

Riley, Sumpter M., Jr. (M) (5) West Ohio 

Risinger, Melvin S. (M) (13) West Virginia 



The United Methodist Church 129 

Ritter, Ralph M. (E) (8) Central Pennsylvania 

Rivers, Mrs. J. R. (M) (7) South Georgia 

Rixse, John H., Jr. (M) (4) Virginia 

Robbins, Carl M. (M) (8) Memphis 

Robbins, Gene E. (M) (12) North Indiana 

Robbins, Wilmer B. (M) (8) Holston 

Roberts, Harold (M) (3) Great Britain 

Roberts, Leigh (M) (7) Wisconsin 

Roberts, Sam (M) (4) West Virginia 

Roberts, Samuel T. (M) (6) Liberia 

Roberts, Sidney (M) (11) Central Texas 

Roberts, Mrs. William T. (M) (1) Tennessee 

Robertson, Frank L. (M) (3) South Georgia 

Robey, William T., Jr. (M) (3) Virginia 

Robinson, Albert (M) (1) East Ohio 

Rodeheffer, Calvin (M) (9) West Ohio 

Rodnguez, Moises M. (M) (deceased) Middle Philippines 

Rogers, Carleton C. (M) (10) Northern Illinois 

Rogers, Mrs. Floyd (E) (7) West Virginia 

Rohrbaugh, Laverne E. (E) (5) Baltimore 

Rollins, Mrs. Rose (M) (13) Northern New Jersey 

Rooks, John J. (M) (8) Florida 

Roper, Wilbur F. (M) (11) North Texas 

Rose, Harold E. (M) (4) Oregon-Idaho 

Ruff, William H. (M) (8) North Georgia 

Rupert, Thomas (M) (4) Kansas West 

Russell, John B. (M) (9) Virginia 

Rutland, Walter B. (M) (9) Florida 

Rutter, Kenneth P. (M) (6) Western Pennsylvania 

Sackmann, Dieter A. (M) (6) South Germany 

Sagar, Sisa Masih (M) (11) Agra 

Saito, Kazuo (M) (10) Southern California- Arizona 

Samson, Restituto F. (M) (4) Northwest Philippines 

Samuel, S. K. (M) (11) South India 

Sanders, Carl J. (M) (9) Virginia 

Sanders, Felix J. (M) (9) _ Louisville 

Santana, Benjamin (M) (12) P^^erto Rico 

Satterfield, John C. (M) (2) • • • • Mississippi 

Sayre, Charles A. (M) (9) Southern New Jersey 

Schiller, Theodore E. (M) (9) Baltimore 

Schilling, Marvin A. (M) (5) ^ ■ Wisconsin 

Schneeberger, Vilem (M) (1) Czechoslovakia 

Schneidereit, Harry (M) (1) Annual Conf. of German 

Democratic Rep. 

Schoenlein, Dr. Charles F. (M) (4) Northern New York 

Schreiber, Lyle J. (E) (1) Minnesota 

Schulz, Willard W. (E) (14) ^ Wisconsin 

Schwiebert, Erwin H. (M) (1) ^P.^'^^^^.'^f ? 

Scott, Ralph (M) (12) Missouri West 

Seals, Woodrow (M) (1) Texas 

Sears, Mrs. Katherine (M) (7) _ ■ Iowa 

Sease, Gene E. (E) (3) Western Pennsylvania 

Seiler, Ralph H. (M) (12) Southwest Texas 

Settle, Frank A. (M) (14) ^Holston 

Sexton, Mrs. Joe (M) (5) Tennessee 

Shamblin, J. Kenneth (M) (2) ..•.,• X ^^^^ 

Sharpe, Guy (M) (12) ^''^t*^ .?T!-^ 

Shaw, inder A. (M) (12) ■^■■^- North India 

Shearer, Daniel L. (E) (2) Central Pennsylvama 



130 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Shearer, Paul V. (M) (2) Iowa 

Shepherd, Paid (M) (5) Louisville 

Shipps, Hammell P. (M) (10) Southern New Jersey 

Shoemaker, Wayne E. (M) (2) Iowa 

Shook, Wallace T.{U) (11) Texas 

Shore, Philip L., Jr. (M) (13) Western North Carolina 

Shown, Mrs. Louise (M) (11) North Indiana 

Shroyer, Lawton W. (E) (4) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Silvers, Mrs. Floyd L. (M) (11) Oklahoma 

Simbine, Titos J. (M) ( ) Southeast Africa 

Simpson, John C, Jr. (M) (11) Virginia 

Sims, R. Paul (M) (5) Southern Illinois 

Singer, Edgar F. (M) (1) Wyoming 

Sites, Mrs. Robert L, (E) (2) North Indiana 

Skeete, F. Herbert (M) (7) New York 

Slutz, Leonard D. (M) (2) West Ohio 

Smith, Alex J. (E) (5) Sierra Leone 

Smith, Eugene L. (M) (2) Northern New Jersey 

Smith, Harold F. (M) (7) Southern New England 

Smith, Holiday (M) (2) Holston 

Smith, Irving L. (M) (14) Oklahoma 

Smith, Mrs. Marshall (M) (7) Mississippi 

Soderberg, John C. (M) (1) Yellowstone 

Soderholm, Mrs. Patricia A. (M) (4) Wisconsin 

Spafford, Freda (E) (6) Detroit 

Spain, Robert H. (M) (13) Tennessee 

Spears, R. Wright (M) (3) South Carolina (1785) 

Speer, Aubrey B. (M) (4) Missouri West 

Springman, Thomas R. (E) (1) Central Pennsylvania 

Sprouls, J. Clifton (M) (2) Oklahoma 

Spurr, Miss Edith (M) (13) Southern New England 

Stambach, Arthur W. (E) (9) Central Pennsylvania 

Standard, Forrest L. (M) (11) Missouri West 

Stanger, Frank B. (M) (3) Southern New Jersey 

Stanley, David L. (M) (1) Southern Illinois 

Stanley, Miles (E) (1) West Virginia 

Stanton, Charles F. (E) (4) South Indiana 

Staubach, William T., Jr. (M) (4) New York 

Stauffer, Eugene E. (M) (12) Northern Illinois 

Steele, Sam (M) (4) New Mexico 

Steffner, John E., Sr. (M) (4) Holston 

Stephens, Ralph L. (M) (7) Northern New Jersey 

Stevenson, Thomas F. (M) (6) North Alabama 

Stewart, Martin J5. (M) (5) New Mexico 

Stich, Siegfried (E) (9) Switzerland (E) 

Sticher, Hermann (E) (5) South Germany 

Stith, Forrest C. (M) (7) Baltimore 

Stokes, Mack B. (M) (6) Holston 

Stone, S. Lloyd (M) (4) Tennessee 

Stovall, James L. (M) (9) Louisiana 

Streeter, Emmett T. (M) (10) Nebraska 

Strickland, Don L. (M) (4) Texas 

Stroh, Byron F. (M) (6) South Indiana 

Strosahl, M. Stanford (M) (3) Wisconsin 

Stuckey, Paul E. (E) (3) West Ohio 

Stumbo, John E. (M) (1) Kansas East 

Styron, Mrs. Arthur (M) (11) North Georgia 

Sundin, Robert (E) (4) North Dakota 

Susat, Edward (M) (10) South Indiana 

Swales, William R. (M) (13) Central New York 



The United Methodist Church 131 

Siveazy, Albert W. (M) (2) Kentucky 

Swofford, Mrs. Ross (M) (13) Missouri East 

Talbert, Melvin G. (M) (13) Southern California-Arizona 

Tate, Godfrey L. (M) (1) Virginia 

Taylor, Eben (M) (14) South Carolina (1785) 

Taylor, Lawrence R. (E) (8) West Michigan 

Taylor, Wendell P. C. (M) (13) Mississippi (FCJ) 

Tholin, Richard D. (E) (1) Northern Illinois 

Thomas, John J. (M) (4) South Indiana 

Thompson, Mrs. Barbara (M) (14) Baltimore 

Thompson, Everett K. (M) (4) Southern Illinois 

Thompson, Gordon G., Jr. (M) (9) North Georgia 

Thompson, Lionel (M) (9) Detroit 

Thornburg, Richard A. (M) (6) New York 

Thornburg, Robert W. (M) (3) Central Illinois 

Thornton, B. I. (M) (4) South Georgia 

Thurman, Arthur V. (M) (2) California-Nevada 

Tignor, Thomas P. (M) (5) Virginia 

Tobler, Theophil J. (M) (5) Switzerland (M) 

Tolbert, Robert J. (M) (6) East Ohio 

Tombaugh, Reid (M) (1) Central Illinois 

Tomlin, William H. (M) (12) Tennessee 

Totten, Harold (E) (13) Kansas West 

Totten, Mrs. Howard (M) (7) Central New York 

Totvnsend, Samuel L. (M) (11) North Carolina 

Trice, William E. (M) (6) North Texas 

Trotter, F. Thomas (M) (6) Southern California-Arizona 

Trotter, J. Irwin (M) (10) Southern California- Arizona 

Truitt, Richard O. (M) (1) Wisconsin 

Tuell, Jack M. (M) (6) Pacific Northwest 

Tullis, Edward L. (M) (7) Kentucky 

Turner, James W. (M) (14) Virginia 

Ukunda, Andre (M) ( ) Central Congo 

Underwood, Harry K. (M) (4) Baltimore 

Unger, E. Paul (M) (6) Central Illinois 

Urbom, Warren K. (M) (5) Nebraska 

Van Brunt, F. Norman (M) (6) Baltimore 

Vandegriff, Paul M. (M) (1) West Ohio 

Van Ornum, Carlton G. (M) (6) Northern New York 

Van Sickle, John R. (M) (9) Northern Illinois 

Vargas, Roberto K. (M) Costa Rica 

Vaughan, William C. (M) (13) Virginia 

Verdin, Douglas F. (M) (13) New York 

Vickers, John E. (M) (2) Alabama-West Florida 

Vijendra Kumar, Maddala R. (M) (4) Hyderabad 

Vinluan, Victor C. (M) (6) Northwest Philippines 

Wagner, Blake D. (E) (5) East Ohio 

Waite, Alvis A., Jr. (M) (6) South Georgia 

Walker, J. Everett (M) (4) California-Nevada 

Walker, James M. (M) (2) Southwest Texas 

Walker, Leon E. (M) (4) Southern New Jersey 

Walker, Morris D. (M) (4) Central Texas 

Walker, W. Roland (M) (10) Virginia 

Wallace, William L., Jr. (M) (6) North Mississippi 

W alley, F. Lewis (M) (6) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Walton, Herbert (M) (8) Northern Illinois 



132 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Ward, A. Sterling (M) (6) Missouri West 

Ward, John W.,Jr.(M) (6) Missouri East 

Warman, John B. (M) (2) Western Pennsylvania 

Warner, Earl D. (E) (11) Central Pennsylvania 

Waterfield, Donald A. (M) (4) Troy 

Watson, Mrs. Elizabeth (M) (7) Oregon-Idaho 

Watson, Martha B. (M) (2) North Texas 

Watson, Michael (M) (7) South Carolina (1785) 

Watson, Mrs. Olive E. (M) (4) Florida 

Watts, Ewart G. (M) (9) Kansas East 

Weaver, L. Stacy (M) (12) North Carolina 

Webb, Paul, Jr. (M) (2) North Georgia 

Webb, Pauline M. (M) (11) Great Britain 

Webber, Frank (M) (8) California-Nevada 

Weems, Mrs . H. V. (M) (6) Florida 

Weinberg, Stanley C, Jr. (M) (5) Southern New England 

Weldon, Wilson O. (M) (5) Western North Carolina 

Werder, Louise (M) (4) North Katanga 

Weston, Charles H. (M) (7) West Ohio 

Westphal, Wilhelm F. (E) (3) Northwest Germany 

Wheatley, Melvin E., Jr. (M) (3) Southern California- Arizona 

Whitaker, George W. (M) (2) South Carolina (1785) 

White, C. Dale (M) (10) Southern New England 

White, Charles D. (M) (12) Western North Carolina 

White, E. McKinnon (M) (1) Southern New England 

White, James K. (M) (13) Central Illinois 

White, Leonard (M) (9) East Ohio 

White, Luther W., Ill (M) (3) Virginia 

White, Raymon E. (M) (13) Holston 

White, William D. (M) (13) Northern Illinois 

White, Woodie W. (M) (10) Detroit 

Whitten, Dolphus, Jr. (M) (9) Oklahoma 

Wichelt, John F. (E) (6) Nebraska 

Wicklein, Mrs. Helen (M) (7) Baltimore 

Wieting, Mrs. Wesley S. (M) (7) Northern Illinois 

Wilcox, Katherine W. (M) (1) West Michigan 

Wilcox, Robert L. (M) (1) Holston 

Wilcoxon, Francis (E) (7) South Indiana 

Wilken, Alferd E. (E) (6) Iowa 

Wilkinson, Donald (M) (9) Wisconsin 

Will, Mary K. (M) (3) Baltimore 

Williams, Frank L. (M) (8) Baltimore 

Williams, George F. (M) (2) Southern California- Arizona 

Williams, John BF (M) (Deceased 9/8/71) Florida 

Wilshusen, Mrs. John (M) (10) Southwest Texas 

Wilson, Carroll (M) (13) Central Texas 

Wilson, Charles E., Jr. (M) (3) North Georgia 

Wilson, Frank S. (M) (1) Holston 

Wilson, Robert L. (M) (5) Alabama- West Florida 

Wilson, T. R. (M) (4) Georgia 

Wilson, Winslow (M) (8) Wisconsin 

Winton, Jeanette (M) (7) New York 

Wolf, John D. (M) (1) North Indiana 

Wonders, Dr. Alice (M) (14) Central Texas 

Wood, Allison C. (M) (13) Northern New York 

Wood, Dr. Donald R. (M) (13) Rocky Mountain 

Wood, George S. (M) (6) Louisville 

Woodall, A. H. (M) (10) North Alabama 

Woods, William F. (E) (10) Central Pennsylvania 

Woomer, James A. (E) (1) Western Pennsylvania 



The United Methodist Church 133 

Wright, George A. (M) (2) South Georgia 

Wright, James W. (M) (6) West Michigan 

Wright, M. Max (E) (8) Kansas East 

Wunderlich, Maria (M) (4) Southwest Germany 

Yaggy, Mrs. William H. (M) (13) Iowa 

Yancey, Charles L, (M) (2) Memphis 

Yarbrough, George M. (M) (1) North Mississippi 

Yeargan, Mrs. Victor (M) (1) North Georgia 

Yingling, L. Carroll (M) (3) Baltimore 

Yocum, Donald R. (M) (7) West Ohio 

Young, H. Claude (M) (7) Western North Carolina 

Young, Robert T. (M) (6) Western North Carolina 

Zehner, Henry W. (E) (10) Eastern Pensylvania 

Ziegler, Wilbur C. (M) (6) Southern New England 

Zimmerman, Eugene M. (M) (13) Florida 

Zorn, George L. (M) (1) South Georgia 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF 
RESERVE DELEGATES 

(Italics denote Ministerial Delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Abbott, W. H. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Abel, Paul F. (M) New York 

Adams, Robert (M) Wisconsin 

Ader, Joe K. (M) Southwest Texas 

Adrian, Paul (E) Kansas West 

Adriano, Santos M. (M) Middle Philippines 

Agler, Mrs. L. M. (M) Northern Illinois 

Akamine, Ernest K. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Aldrich, Charles S. (M) Western New York 

Alexander, Ben C. (M) Tennessee 

Alford, J. W. (M) Mississippi 

Alford, Mrs. Thelma (M) Peninsula 

Allen, Charles L. (M) Texas 

Allen, Jerry (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Allen, Joe B. (M) Texas 

Alley, Mrs. Clyde (E) West Virginia 

Alley, Raymond A. (M) Florida 

Allman, S. H. (M) Little Rock 

Almo7id, Lawrence F. (M) Southern New England 

Alsobrook, W. A. (M) South Georgia 

Anderson, Hurst R. (M) Baltimore 

Anderson, Mrs. Georgia (M) Baltimore 

Anderson, Mrs. Ruth (M) Southern New England 

Anglin, James F. (E) North Indiana 

Antes, Charles W. (M) Iowa 

App, Donald B. (E) Rocky Mountain 

Appleby, Harvey (M) Peninsula 

Appling, W. A. (M) Northwest Texas 

Arbaugh, Robert N. (M) Missouri West 

Archer, John (M) East Ohio 

Armentrout, Olin (M) Holston 

Arnold, Frederick D. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Ashby, Harvey W. (M) Virginia 

Atchison, Calvin (M) Tennessee 

Atkinson, Sydney H. (M) New York 

Avery, Keith T. (M) West Michigan 

Babbs, J. Carlton (M) Rocky Mountain 

Backenson, Henry L. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Bagley, Roy I. (M) Little Rock 

Bailen, Gregorio R. (M) Northwest Philippines 

Bailor, Alfred M. (E) Sierra Leone 

Baird, C. Robert (M) West Ohio 

Baker, Mrs. Jane (M) West Ohio 

Baker, Pamela (M) Kansas East 

Baker, Robert L. (M) Western North Carolina 

Bahomb, Raymond E. (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Ballou, James D. (M) West Ohio 

Bane, W. V. (M) Central Texas 

Banks, Mrs. Henrine W. (M) Florida 

Barnes, Donald L. (M) North Indiana 

Barnett, I, Nels (M) North Arkansas 

Barrett, Samuel M. (M) Oklahoma 

Barrow, Emmitt C. (M) Texas 

134 



The United Methodist Church 135 

Barrow, Mrs. Opal (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Bauman, David B. (M) Gujarat 

Baumgardner, Robert (M) Northwest Texas 

Baxley, Mrs. Beulah H. (M) South Carolina (1866) 

Bayliss, John A. (M) North Arkansas 

Beal, Jim (M) North Arkansas 

Beaman, Charles G., Jr. (M) Western North Carolina 

Bean, Frank (M) Kentucky 

Bear, Orval L. (M) Central Illinois 

Bechdol, Mrs. Ralph (M) South Indiana 

Beck, Kenneth O. (M) Minnesota 

Becker, Richard L. (M) Kansas East 

Belk, Mrs. Ethel (M) West Virginia 

Bell, James M. (M) Tennessee 

Bell, Thomas (M) Southern New England 

Bennett, Benjamin (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Benson, Howard C. (M) Northern Illinois 

Berg, Barrel E. (M) Nebraska 

Berg, Josef E. (M) Sweden 

Bergmann, Lynn A. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Bergwall, Evan H., Sr. (M) North Indiana 

Bergwall, Mrs. Evan H., Jr. (M) North Indiana 

Berisford, Martin A., Jr. (E) West Virginia 

Bermudez, Efrain (M) Costa Rica 

Bernardo, Teodoro (M) Philippines 

Betterly, Austin E. (E) (Deceased) Central New York 

Biggers, Gilbert M. (M) Louisville 

Bishop, Audie C. (M) North Mississippi 

Bishop, Bruce H. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Bishop, Mrs. Gerald 0. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Bishop, William E. (M) Baltimore 

Bjerno, Henning (M) Denmark 

Blair, Mrs. Douglas (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Blair, J. Seaborn (M) North Carolina 

Blaising, Marcus J. (M) South Indiana 

Bland, Cecil E. (M) Louisiana 

Bledsoe, Robert D. (M) Florida 

Bliven, Owen R. (M) Western New York 

Boettcher, Mrs. Lu (M) Wisconsin 

Boggs, Robert C. (M) Florida 

Boleyn, Charles W. (M) North Georgia 

Bolinger, George (M) Central Illinois 

Bond, Nye 0. (M) Nebraska 

Booth, Dale (M) Little Rock 

Boss, Leroy (M) Peninsula 

Bostwick, W. E. (M) South Georgia 

Boswell, George (M) North Texas 

Boidton, Edwin C. (M) Iowa 

Bowen, John (M) West Ohio 

Bowen, Theodore R. (M) Baltimore 

Bowen, William C. (M) North Georgia 

Bowyer, Mrs. John (E) West Virginia 

Bowyer, Richard O. (M) West Virginia 

Boyer, Samuel C. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Bradley, Cecil E. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Brandt, Frede (M) Denmark 

Brankhorst, Mrs. Edward (M) Missouri East 

Brannon, William C. (M) North Alabama 

Branscomb, Louise (M) North Alabama 

Braswell, Henry (M) North Texas 

Braucht, Jack H. (M) South Georgia 



136 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Breland, A. Dan (M) Mississippi 

Brewster, Jerry G. (M) Memphis 

Brittain, Thomas N. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Brockman, Mrs. Vivian (M) Rocky Mountain 

Broome, Allan R. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Brose, Winfried (M) West Berlin 

Brown, Dr. Claude W. (M) Southwest Texas 

Brown, E. Russell (M) Rocky Mountain 

Brown, Frank E. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Brown, Gladstone L. (M) East Ohio 

Broyles, Jay E. (M) Tennessee 

Buchmiiller, Josua (E) Switzerland (E) 

Budarpur, H. C. (M) South India 

Budd, W. Candler (M) North Georgia 

Buell, Harold E. (M) Florida 

Buford, John L. (M) Southern Illinois 

Bugbee, Wary-en A. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Buresova, Mrs. Marta (M) Czechoslovakia 

Burge, Donald (M) East Ohio 

Burgess, E. Clayton, Jr. (M) Troy 

Burgess, J. R. (M) North Georgia 

Burkett, Newton, Jr. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Burkitt, Olga (M) New York 

Burney, Harry L., Jr. (M) Florida 

Butler, David J. (M) Iowa 

Butler, J. Weldon (M) Northwest Texas 

Byrkit, Ervin (M) Rocky Mountain 

Cain, Wesley Ralph (M) Louisiana 

Caine, Dr. Donald (M) North Dakota 

Caldwell, Charles W. (M) Missouri West 

Calhoun, Mrs. Frank A. (M) Tennessee 

Campney, Arthur B. (M) Iowa 

Canafax, Jackson (M) Central Illinois 

Cannon, Joel E. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Cannon, Ralph A. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Caraway, James J. (M) Louisiana 

Cariker, C. E. (M) South Georgia 

Carle, John R. (M) Oklahoma 

Carlstedt, Gustav G. (M) Sweden 

Carro, Bengt (M) Sweden 

Carroll, B. F. (M) Central Texas 

Carruth, Paul (M) North Carolina 

Carter, Clifford L. (M) West Ohio 

Carter Fletcher (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Case, Riley L. (M) North Indiana 

Catlin, Dale (E) Central Illinois 

Chairer, Jane (M) Detroit 

Chambers, Marshall (E) North Indiana 

Chand, Mrs. Shirin I. (M) Lucknow 

Chaney, Tom (M) Missouri East 

Chawhan, Samuel K. (M) Gujarat 

Cheney, Edward B. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Cherry, William T. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Chilcote, Thomas F. (M) Holston 

Childress, Robert T., Jr. (M) Central Texas 

Chiles, Charles E. (M) Virginia 

Chinn, Harvey N. ( E ) California-Nevada 

Chow, W. Jing (M) West Ohio 

Christian, Samson T. (M) Gujarat 

Christopher, Richard L. (M) South Indiana 



The United Methodist Church 137 

Christy, John H. (M) . Western North Carolina 

Clardy, Mrs. Clarence (M) Missouri East 

Clary, Mrs. Irvin (E) East Ohio 

Clay, Thomas B. (M) Western New York 

Cleveland, Howard L. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Cleveland, Weyman R. (M) South Georgia 

Cline, Eleanor (M) New York 

Cli7ie, John M. (M) North Carolina 

Clymer, Wayne K. (E) Northern Illinois 

Coad, Richard P. (M) West Ohio 

Cobb, Mrs. Ed. (M) Nebraska 

Cochran, Robert E. (E) West Ohio 

Cochrane, Maynard (M) South Dakota 

Cockrill, Willard (M) Louisville 

Coffin, Allen (M) Detroit 

Collin, Anne Marie (M) Sweden 

Collins, Christopher J. (M) East Ohio 

Collins, John C. (M) New York 

Conklin, Rowland S. (M) Troy 

Cook, Dean F. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Cooper, Lawrence T. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Coots Fred H. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Corbett, James D. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Corhin, J. Wesley (E) Wisconsin 

Corl, Daniel D. (E) East Ohio 

Corriher, Walter D. (M) Western North Carolina 

Cortes, Nathanael L. (M) Philippines 

Coidter, H. Russell (M) Central Ilhnois 

Cousins, James G. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Cox, Ralph E. (E) Oregon-Idaho 

Crabtree, H. Glenn (E) West Ohio 

Cramer, Mrs. Irene (E) Wisconsin 

Crandall, J. Roland (M) Iowa 

Crawford, Arthur M. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Crawford, Mrs. Mary G. (M) ■ • -'^?xas 

Crawford, Raymond P. (E) South Indiana 

Crayton, Alfred L. (M) Wyoming 

Crenshaw, Bryan (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Crippen, James A. (M) ^^^^P}^ 

Crist, Mrs. Dollie L. (M) Florida 

Crocker, Hiigh D. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Crummey, D. Clifford (M) California-Nevada 

Cryer, Donald W. (M) ■ West Ohio 

Curl, William E. (M) North Alabama 

Curry, Earl T. (M) Kentucky 

Curry, James S. (M) ^-^n ' v ^il^'fifif 

Curry, John W., Sr. (M) South Carolina (1866) 

Curtis, Charles M. (M) Kansas West 

Curtis, George E. (M) Maine 

da Costa, Matoso Santos (M) ^ Angola 

Dammann, Mrs. Chester (M) East L.hio 

Dangarembga, Susan (M) Rhodesia 

Danley, Samuel B. (M) Baltimore 

Dass, John B. (M) ^Bombay 

Dass, Prema (M) t. . ' -o ^u^kno^v 

Daugherty, Robert M. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 



David, Nirmal (M) 



Lucknow 



David, Shanthappa V. (M) ^ ■ ^Hyderabad 

Davidson, Barney L. (M) North Carolina 

Davidson, John H. (M) Virginia 



138 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Davis, Doris (M) Southern Illinois 

Davis, Elwood (M) Southern New Jersey- 
Daws, H. Homer (M) West Virginia 

Davis, James H. (M) Iowa 

Davis, James T. (M) West Ohio 

Davis, Laurence R. (M) Nebraska 

Dawson, Roy K. (M) North Alabama 

Dean, Mrs. Barton (M) Kansas East 

Dean, Ben, Jr. (M) West Michigan 

Dean, Benjamin F. (M) Delhi 

Deaver, Leonard E. (E) Iowa 

Decker, Clyde A. (M) Virginia 

Deffebach, Lyle L. (M) Northwest Texas 

DeHaan, Dr. Fred (M) Iowa 

Deiss, Werner ( E ) Southwest Germany 

Delp, Walter Owen, Jr. (E) West Ohio 

DeMoss, Lynn A. (M) West Michigan 

Denman, James E. (M) Missouri West 

Dial, Adolph R. (M) North Carolina 

Dice, Howard (M) Northern New York 

Dickeyi, John (M) North Indiana 

Dickens, Connie (M) West Virginia 

Dickson, Clarence H. (M) Western North Carolina 

Dickson, Nathan A. (M) Mississippi 

Dietrich, Clyde W. (E) , Western Pennsylvania 

Dillin, 0. E. (M) Western North Carolina 

Di'mmler, Rolf (M) South Germany 

Dixon, W. Edge (M) West Ohio 

Dodgen, Ethan W. (M) North Arkansas 

Doggett, Carroll A. (M) Baltimore 

Dominick, Frank M. (M) North Alabama 

Donner, James L. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Dorff, Earl N. (M) Oklahoma 

Dorsey, Harold W. (M) Kentucky 

Doty, L. Arthur (M) Troy 

Douglas, Willard H. (M) Virginia 

Douglass, Paul F. ( M) Memphis 

Dowd, John A. (E) Iowa 

Dowse, Mrs. Richard K. (M) Louisville 

Doyle, Christopher D. (M) New York 

Doyle, D. Paul (M) North Alabama 

Drake, M. R. (M) East Ohio 

Duecker, R. Sheldon (M) North Indiana 

Duke, Charles D. (M) Mississippi 

Dunlap, E. Dale (M) Kansas West 

Dunlap, Mrs. William F. (M) East Ohio 

Durham, Donald W. (M) Kentucky 

Dykes, David L., Jr. (M) Louisiana 

Early, Charles M. (M) Virginia 

Eberhart, Tom (M) North Georgia 

Edman, Clarence D. (E) West Virginia 

Edwards, K. Morgan (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Egger, Darris L. (M) Northwest Texas 

Egger, John F. (M) Mississippi 

Ekin, Floy J. (M) Central Illinois 

Ellington, William D. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Elliott, Avenell (M) Kansas West 

Elmore, S. Joe (M) North Alabama 

Emerick, Jack F. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Emmert, Herman A. (E) West Ohio 



The United Methodist Church 139 

Engelhardt, Christian L. (M) New York 

Erck, Fred (M) Southwest Texas 

Erwin, Richard C. (M) Western North Carolina 

Eskew, Wendell (M) West Virginia 

Estilow, Ulysses S. (E) Southern New Jersey 

Evans, Evan C. (M) Louisville 

Everhart, Frank (M) West Virginia 

Eversley, John C. (M) New York 

Ewald, Edward L. (M) Baltimore 

Ewers, Duane A. (M) North Dakota 

Ewing, Miss Betsy K. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Ewing, William K. (M) Louisville 

Faber, Fran (M) Minnesota 

Fannings, Mrs, Helen (M) Northern Illinois 

Farley, Mrs. Paul (E) Northern Illinois 

Faubion, Mrs. E. Maurice (M) Texas 

Faulkner, Arthur M. (M) Western North Carolina 

Fears, Macon F. (M) Virginia 

Felder, Cain H. (M) Southern New England 

Felts, Clay W. (M) Oklahoma 

Felty, Beverly (M) Virginia 

Fenstermacher, Mrs. Robert (M) North Indiana 

Fergusoyi, John C. (M) Northern Illinois 

Ferree, James W. ( M ) Western North Carolina 

Fetter, C. Willard (E) West Ohio 

Fields, Richard E. (M) South Carolina (1866) 

Figgs, Clyde P. (M) Virginia 

Finch, George D. (M) Western North Carolina 

Findley, William C. (E) Kansas West 

Finney, W. Wray (M) Oklahoma 

Firth, William E. (M) Baltimore 

Fitzgerald, Er^iest A. (M) Western North Carolina 

Flaming, Wilbert K. (M) Nebraska 

Fletcher, Fremont (M) Minnesota 

Flood, Harold D. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Flores, Finees (M) Northern Illinois 

Forbes, Robert (M) Central New York 

Ford, Earl L. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Forehand, George H. (M) North Carolina 

Forkner, Stanley H. (E) West Michigan 

Forni, Roy (M) East Ohio 

Forsberg, Winfield (M) Minnesota 

Fossett, Warren J. (M) Oklahoma 

Fox, Miss Anna (M) Central Illinois 

Foy, James D. (M) Baltimore 

Francis, John H., Jr. (M) Wisconsin 

Francis, John L. (M) West Michigan 

Franklin, A. T. (M) Lucknow 

Franklin, Miss Dorris (M) Lucknow 

Franks, James S, (M) Holston 

Frederick, Charles L. (M) North Alabama 

Freeman, W. Carroll (M) Virginia 

French, Burton L. (M) Virginia 

Fritchley, Newton H. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Gacutan, Ezekias G. (M) Northwest Philippines 

Galbraith, Mrs. John A. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Gallaway, Ira (M) Central Texas 

Galloway, Henry G. (M) Florida 

Gardner, William A. (M) South Carolina (1785) 



140 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Garibay, LimeHo C. (M) Mindanao 

Garrison, Langdon H. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Gates, Matthew H. (M) New York 

Gee, Thomas A. (E) Southern New England 

George, Anchula T. (M) Hyderabad 

George, Irene (M) Kansas West 

Getty, Donald A. (M) California-Nevada 

Gihhs, Marion M. (M) Florida 

Gillespie, Sylvester T. (M) North Carolina 

Gilreath, Mrs. Judy (M) North Texas 

Girton, Paul K. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Gladstone, Herbert S. (M) Hyderabad 

Goebel, Eberhard (E) West Berlin 

Gold, Glenn W. (M) Florida 

Gooclgame, Gordon C. (M) Holston 

Goodwin, E. Bert, Jr. (M) North Alabama 

Goodwin, Miss Edith M. (M) Florida 

Goodwin, Mrs. Louise (M) West Ohio 

Goodwin, Robert B. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Gordon, Prentiss, Sr. (M) North Mississippi 

Graber, Robert L. (M) East Ohio 

Graham, George G. (M) Oklahoma 

Granberry, Seth W. (M) Mississippi 

Grant, John A. (E) Florida 

Grant, Robert E. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Graves, Wallace B. (M) South Indiana 

Gray, Barrel D. (M) Southwest Texas 

Gray, Ralph M. (M) East Ohio 

Green, Mrs. Thomas P. (M) Louisville 

Greer, W. E. (M) Texas 

Griffith, Evelyn (M) Detroit 

Griggs, Ulysses S., Sr. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Grinager, Lloyd K. (M) South Dakota 

Grooms, Jordan (M) Northwest Texas 

Gross, Ben (M) California-Nevada 

Grumbein, Percy (E) Southern California- Arizona 

Grummon, Richard R. (M) Central Illinois 

Gruver, Esdras S. (M) Virginia 

Guevara, Alexis (M) Costa Rica 

Gulliksen, Erling (M) Norway 

Gustafson, M. 0. (M) North Georgia 

Hager, Alfred D. (M) Kansas East 

Hahn, Robert J. (E) East Ohio 

Haines, Henry L. (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Haist, Willard P. (E) Detroit 

Hale, Ralph E. (M) Little Rock 

Hall, Kenneth T. (M) South Georgia 

Hall, N. Guy (M) Missouri West 

Hamilton, Charles P. (M) Florida 

Hamilton, Charles W. (M) East Ohio 

Hamilton, Edward E. (M) New Mexico 

Hancock, C. David (E) South Indiana 

Hancock, C. W. (M) South Georgia 

Handy, Miss Doris M. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Hankins, Ja^nes E. (M) Holston 

Hanlin, William (E) East Ohio 

Hansen, John T. (M) (deceased) Central Illinois 

Harada, David J. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Harbarger, Wayne Boyce, Jr. (M) West Ohio 

Harbin, Melton E. (M) Western North Carolina 



The United Methodist Church 141 

Hardin, Paul, III (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Harding, Richard E. (M) Southern New England 

Hares, James (M) North Texas 

Hargrove, Bruce (M) North Carolina 

Harkness, Norval (M) West Ohio 

Harper, Lyle E. (M) Baltimore 

Harpster, Dorothy (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Harring, Javies L. ( E ) Wyoming 

Harris, Mrs. C. O. (M) South Indiana 

Harris, Frederick (M) North Georgia 

Harris, W. M., Jr. (M) North Alabama 

Harris, William M. (M) Southwest Texas 

Harrison, Walter (M) South Georgia 

Harshman, David T. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Hart, William G. (M) Northern New York 

Hartsell, Woodrow W. (M) Western North Carolina 

Hartung, Ro7i H. (M) South Dakota 

Hathaivay, Offie L. (M) North Carolina 

Haun, Miss Mildred (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Hauptman, Leo (M) North Indiana 

Hauser, Louis C. (M) New York 

Hdvek, Vaclav (M) Czechoslovakia 

Haivk, Louis B. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Hayes, Robert E., Sr. (M) Texas 

Hay good, W. Hooper ( M) Texas 

Haynes, L. L., Jr. (M) Louisiana 

Hays, Ralph (M) (deceased) Mississippi 

Head, Leivis N. (M) Florida 

Heard, Milton, Jr. (M) South Georgia 

Hearn, J. Woodrow (M) Louisiana 

Heck, J. Holland (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hefley, Charles E. (M) North Indiana 

Heflin, James M. ( M ) Texas 

Helgesson, Alf (M) Southeast Africa 

Hemphill, William, Jr. (M) Peninsula 

Henderson, Coryielius L. (M) Georgia 

Henderson, John (M) Southern Illinois 

Henry, Mrs. William M. (M) Peninsula 

Henton, Jack H. (M) Memphis 

Herbert, Hugh S. ( M ) Yellowstone 

Hermann, Theodor (M) Southwest Germany 

Herr, Helen C. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hershberger, George (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Hester, John S. (M) Memphis 

Hicks, L. T. (E) Oklahoma 

Hierholzer, Elmer J. (M) Southwest Texas 

Higgins, D. Rayborn (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Hildyard, Hobart R. (M) . Kansas East 

Hillis, Raymond (M) Little Rock 

Hillman, Mrs. E. L. (M) North Carolina 

Hinshaw, Lawrence A. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Hinzman, Parker L. (E) West Virginia 

Hipp, J. C. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Hippel, George N. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hirschman, Russell (M) South Indiana 

Hoffer, Paul F. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hogg, William K. (M) East Ohio 

Hole, D. Leslie (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Holler, J. Carlisle (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Holm, Carl-Axel (M) Sweden 

Holmes, Robert C. (M) South Indiana 



142 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Holmes, William A. (M) Southwest Texas 

Holte, Alfred O. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Hook, James S. (E) North Indiana 

Hoover, Mrs. Robert J. (M) Iowa 

Hostetter, Russell R. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Howe, Gaylon L. (M) Florida 

Howe, Robert B. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Howland, Leslie W. (M) Maine 

Huber, Paul W. (M) Virginia 

Hudson, Mary A. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Huffman, Mrs. Frank W. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Hulasi Rae, John V. (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Hulsebus, Douglas (E) Iowa 

Hunt, Walter L. (M) Wyoming 

Hunter, C. Pershing (M) New York 

Hunter, J. Duncan (M) North Alabama 

Huntington, Mrs, Earle (M) Northern Illinois 

Hutchins, Charles A. (M) Holston 

Hutchins, Joshua, Jr. (M) Baltimore 

Hutchinson, Orion N., Jr. (M) Western North Carolina 

Ibasco, Abelardo O. (M) Northern Philippines 

Ikeda, Tsuguo (M) Pacific Northwest 

Ingram, Osmond K. (M) North Carolina 

Ireland, Melvon L. (M) Nebraska 

Ireland, Wayne L. (M) Minnesota 

Ives, S. Clifton (M) Maine 

Jackson, Andrew (M) West Michigan 

Jackson, James L. (M) Georgia 

Jackson, Rhett (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Jenkins, Daniel C. (M) West Ohio 

Jenkins, Leo W. (M) North Carolina 

Jenkins, W. Y., Jr. (M) (deceased) South Carolina (1785) 

Jeter, Mrs. Velma M. (M) Texas 

Jimenez, Bienenido J. (M) Northern Philippines 

Johnson, Carroll (M) Mississippi 

Johnson, Cubell A. (M) Florida 

Johnson, Elizabeth A. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Johnson, Mrs. Frank (M) Southern New Jersey 

Johnson, Mrs. Howard (M) North Arkansas 

Johnson, John G. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Johnston, Joseph S. (M) Virginia 

Jolley, Delbert E. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Jones, George K. (M) Tennessee 

Jones, J. Karl (M) Kansas West 

Jones, James I. (M) Florida 

Jones, Major J. (M) Holston 

Jones, S. Jameson (M) Rocky Mountain 

Jordan, Ben F. ( M ) North Arkansas 

Jordan, Charles W. (M) Northern Illinois 

Jud, Eugene F. (M) Central Texas 

Jury, John S. (M) Detroit 

Kaatz, Torrey A. (E) West Ohio 

Kaelble, Alfred (M) South Germany 

Kaiser, Samuel M. (M) North Indiana 

Kalas, J. Ellsworth (M) Wisconsin 

Kamm, Wayne K. (M) Iowa 

Katayama, Roy (M) North Indiana 

Kates, Robert L. (M) Mississippi 



The United Methodist Church 143 

Kauffman, Gerald D. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Kauffman, John E. (E) Southern Illinois 

Katjs, Cnie U. (M) Kentucky 

Keller, Edward M. (M) Wisconsin 

Kellerman, Garfield H., Jr. (E) Detroit 

Kelly, Owen T. (M) Virginia 

Kelso, Earl F. (M) Florida 

Kelz, Linton (M) West Ohio 

Kennaugh, John H. (E) West Michigan 

Kennedy, Stanley C. (M) Iowa 

Kerns, Willis (M) Minnesota 

Kerr, Charles S. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Kibler, Russell (M) South Indiana 

Kidd, Charles O. (M) Virginia 

King, Martha (M) North Georgia 

Kinnard, Cannon (M) Missouri East 

Kinnett, William R. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Kinsey, Mrs. A. M, (M) Northern Illinois 

Kirk, Arthur R. (M) East Ohio 

Kirk, William (M) Southern New Jersey 

Kirkland, H. Burnham (M) New York 

Kirkpatrick, Dow (M) Northern Illinois 

Kistler, Richard (E) North Indiana 

Kleinitz, Erwin (E) West Berlin 

Knight, David (M) East Ohio 

Knight, John L. (M) Central New York 

Knight, William E. (M) Virginia 

Knisely, Roger M. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Koi, Paul (M) Central Congo 

Kokolias, Mrs. Dorothy (E) Northern New Jersey 

Kopp, Lamar W. (E) Baltimore 

Kraatz, Alvin L., Sr. (E) Western New York 

Krause, Bruce E. (M) Texas 

Krause, Gerald A. (M) Wisconsin 

Krech, Walter D. (M) Central Illinois 

Kreidler, Clair C. ( E ) Central Pennsylvania 

Kreitner, Mrs. H. L. (M) Central Texas 

Kuczma, Adam (M) Poland 

Kuczma, Lidia (M) Poland 

Kuhler, Warren (M) South Dakota 

Kulp, John C. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Kumm, Joachim (M) West Berlin 

Kumm, Kurt ( M ) Southwest Germany 

Ktirtz, Merwin R. (E) Kansas East 

Lai, Mohan (M) Bengal 

Lall, Miss Premlata (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Lance, Bert (M) North Georgia 

Lance, Charles ( M ) Agra 

Landis, Theodore E. (M) Virginia 

Laney, James T. (M) Memphis 

Lang, Albert V. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Lange, James A. (E) (Transferred Out) Western New York 

Langer, Horst (E) German Democratic Republic 

Langford, Thomas A. (M) Western North Carolina 

Langley, Earnest (M) Northwest Texas 

Lanier, Anna E. (M) East Ohio 

Larson, Norma (M) Minnesota 

Laskey, Mrs. Glenn E. (M) Louisiana 

Laskey, W. Jennings (M) Northern Illinois 

Law, James G. (M) Central Pennsylvania 



144 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Lawson, David J. (M) South Indiana 

Lawson, James M. (M) Memphis 

Lay, Gerald W. (M) Holston 

Ledebur, Gilbert (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Lee, Jack W. (M) West Ohio 

LeGro, James M. (M) Central New York 

Leighton, Mrs. Woodrow (E) Central Illinois 

Lein, Woldeinar (M) Northwest Germany 

Lembke, Dr. Glen L. (M) Southwest Texas 

Lewis, Monroe C. (M) North Alabama 

Lindberg, Kenneth D. (M) Detroit 

Lindell, Rolf (M) Sweden 

Lindsay, T. Landon (M) Southern New England 

Lindsey, Jane (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Lindstrom, David (M) Central Illinois 

Ling, Carl C. (M) West Ohio 

Lippnian, Roland A. (M) Southern Illinois 

Locher, Donald R. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Lockowandt, Walter (E) Virginia 

Loesch, Warren A. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Long, A. Lewis (E) Central Illinois 

Long, Richard B. (M) Wyoming 

Longenecker, Robert P. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Longsivorth, John E. (M) West Ohio 

Lorch, Basil H., Jr. (M) South Indiana 

Lord, H. T. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Lovasz, Johannes K. (M) Northwest Germany 

Love, Grace (M) Detroit 

Love, John L. (M) Central New York 

Lowe, Jonathan (M) West Virginia 

Luff, William G. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Lukens, Robert J. (M) Wyoming 

Lundquist, C. David (M) West Michigan 

Lushbough, Mrs. Lillian (M) South Dakota 

Lutz, Robert W. (E) Baltimore 

Lynn, Hawley B. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Machado, Abel P. (M) California-Nevada 

Mackay, Donald M. (M) Florida 

Mackey, J. Robert (M) Peninsula 

Maibach, Paul (E) East Ohio 

Major, James E. (M) Little Rock 

Makonga, Arnold • . .North Katanga 

Mandrelle, J. P. G. (M) Lucknow 

Mann, C. Jordan (M) Southwest Texas 

Mann, George M. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Manning, Charles C. (M) Virginia 

Manning Hubert V. (M) South Carolina (1866) 

Mapanao, Alfredo C. (M) Mindanao 

Marandih, Mrs. Sarala (M) Bengal 

Marker, Charles W. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Marquardt, Mrs. A. W. (M) Nebraska 

Marrs, Ross W. (M) South Indiana 

Marsland, Irving A., Jr. (M) New York 

Martin, Harold C. (M) North Alabama 

Martin, James I. (M) Wisconsin 

Martin, S. Walter (M) South Georgia 

Marty, Dr. Wayne (E) Iowa 

Masih, Komal (M) Moradabad 

Mason, L. Keith (M) Louisiana 

Massie, Hugh (M) Western North Carolina 



The United Methodist Church 145 

Mast, Jacob W. (M) Virginia 

Master, Ithiel V. (M) Gujarat 

Matthaei, Paul (M) Kansas West 

Mauerhan, Clarence W. (E) Southern California-Arizona 

Mmj, Felton E. (M) Peninsula 

Mayer, Theodore C. (M) East Ohio 

Mayfield, Robert G. (M) (5) Kentucky 

McAdavis, Emil (M) Louisville 

McBrayer, 0. A. (M) Northwest Texas 

McCalhmi, Marvin H. (M) Detroit 

McCartney, Mrs. Victor (E) Missouri East 

McCleary, Paul F. (M) Central Illinois 

McClinton, Clark C. (M) North Arkansas 

McCool, David (M) North Mississippi 

McCorviack, James H. (M) "West Ohio 

McCormick, Gerald A. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

McCormick, Paul R. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

McCracken, Edgar W. (M) lov^^a 

McCune, Mrs. Robert J. (M) Central New York 

McDonell, C. Durward (M) (5) Florida 

McFall, Carl S. (M) Oklahoma 

McFarland, Mrs. R. J. (M) Northern Illinois 

McGregor, Mrs. Warren (M) Wyoming 

McGrew, Mrs. Mary M. (M) Texas 

McGuire, Douglas L. (M) Louisiana 

Mcintosh, Burt A. (M) Central Illinois 

Mclnturf, Wayne (M) West Ohio 

Mclntyre, John J. (M) Rocky Mountain 

McLeod, David V/. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

McMahan, Donald F. (M) (10) North Indiana 

McQueen, Jack (M) Southwest Texas 

McVey, Charles (E) West Ohio 

Mead, Mrs. Charles W. (M) Nebraska 

Meador, James A. (M) Virginia 

Meadows, Archie L. (M) North Mississippi 

Meares, John M. (M) North Carolina 

Medkeff, Mrs. Emma (E) West Ohio 

Medlin, William T., Jr. (M) Western North Carolina 

Mehl, Mrs. Blanche (M) Missouri West 

Meier, H. F., Jr. (M) Central Texas 

Mercado, LaVerne D. (M) Middle Philippines 

Meredith, Victor K., Sr. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Merz, Alfred (E) Switzerland (E) 

Mettling, Carl G. (M) Northern Illinois 

Metzler, Ed. E., Ill (M) New York 

Mevis, Mrs. Joyce ( E ) Wisconsin 

Meyer, Lester A. (M) Oklahoma 

Michael, Marion S. (M) Baltimore 

Mick, Billee S. (M) West Virginia 

Middleton, Wayne B. (E) Detroit 

Miles, Emory S. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Miller, Harry (E) West Virginia 

Miller, Millard J. (E) West Ohio 

Miller, W. Jene (M) Oklahoma 

Miller, Williayyi T. (M) Iowa 

Mills, Ardilla (E) Yellowstone 

Minnick, Carlton P. (M) Virginia 

Minsker, John H. (M) Western New York 

Minus, Paul M., Jr. (M) West Ohio 

Mitchell, Mrs. B. V. (M) East Ohio 

Mitchell, Everett R. (M) Kansas West 



146 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Mixson, Rex M. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Mohrmann, Werner (E) Northwest Germany 

Moore, Mrs. Homer (M) New Mexico 

Moore, Robiyison C. (M) Kansas East 

Moore, Roy C. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Mooring, J. D. ( M) North Texas 

Moots, Philip R. (M) West Ohio 

Morlan, Darrell E. (M) North Indiana 

Morris, John E. (M) Florida 

Morris, William W. (M) Tennessee 

Moses, Kollur V. (M) Hyderabad 

Moss, Melvin C. (M) Virginia 

Master, Rolf (M) Norway 

Moivrey, James Z?. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Muiongue, Chadreque J Southeast Africa 

Mulder, John W. (M) Detroit 

Mulroy, James R. (M) Memphis 

Mulundu, Jonathan S. (M) Southern Congo 

Mund, Allen W. (E) Baltimore 

Munden, C. Ebb, III (M) Nebraska 

Munjoma, Samuel (M) Rhodesia 

Munson, Sam (M) Yellowstone 

Murphy, C. Edwin (M) Nebraska 

Murphy, William T. (M) South Indiana 

Murray, Alvin C. (M) Little Rock 

Murray, Richard T. (M) Texas 

Mwambai, Leon (M) North Katanga 

Myers, C. Ray (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Napier, Charles E. (M) Missouri East 

Nathan, James (M) Lucknow 

Nease, Edgar H. (M) Western North Carolina 

Neely, Sam H., Jr. (M) Holston 

Nelson, William L. J. (M) South Carolina (1866) 

Neto, Mateus Joao Sebastian (M) Angola 

Nettleton, James L. (M) Southern Illinois 

Neumann, Norman C. ( E ) North Dakota 

Newman, John W. (M) Virginia 

Ngongo, Daniel (M) Central Congo 

Nicholas, Clarence R. (M) Minnesota 

Noland, Robert J. (M) North Georgia 

Nordieng, Ingemar (M) Sweden 

Norris, Mrs. Clyde (M) Nebraska 

Norton, Elbert B. (M) North Alabama 

Nothdurft, Clifton G. (M) Kansas East 

Nugent, Randolph W. (M) New York 

O'Dell, A. Glen (E) South Indiana 

Oden, Waldo T., Jr. (M) Oklahoma 

Oden, William B. (M) Oklahoma 

Oliphant, George W. (M) Holston 

Olivas, Mardoqrieo L. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Oot, Arthur B., Jr. (M) Northern New York 

Orr, John H. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Orrick, L. C. (M) Texas 

Orton, Hubert E. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Ostertag, Frank, Sr. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Owen, Hugh (M) Alabama- West Florida 

Padgett, Edgar A. (M) North Georgia 

Page, Conrad M., Jr. (E) Central Pennsylvania 



The United Methodist Church 147 

Page, Mrs. Dennis E. (M) Memphis 

Page, Jack W. (M) North Carolina 

Palmer, Mrs. Jane (M) Baltimore 

Pannell, James M. (M) Virginia 

Parker, Bruce G. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Parker, Clarence E. (M) Iowa 

Parmar, Rameshchandra E. (M) Gujarat 

Parr, Thomas H. (M) Texas 

Parrish, John W. (M) Detroit 

Parrish, Robert L. (M) Western North Carolina 

Parrott, Gleyin R. (M) Iowa 

Patrick, William H. (M) Louisiana 

Patten, William C. (M) New Mexico 

Patterson, Joyce Raye (M) Missouri West 

Patterson, Ruthetta A. (M) New York 

Paulson, Delbert C. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Pearce, Richard W. (M) Florida 

Peden, Homer C. (M) Mississippi 

Pembroke, Maceo D. (M) Northern Illinois 

Penrod, Miss Blanche (E) South Indiana 

Perkins, Rual T. ( M ) Louisville 

Perry, Bob G. (M) North Mississippi 

Perry, Kirby W. (M) Southwest Texas 

Persinger, Mrs. John (M) Rocky Mountain 

Peters, Robert N. (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Peterson, Will (M) South Georgia 

Pettijohn, Rex E. (M) Oklahoma 

Phillips, Charles W. (M) Western North Carolina 

Phillips, J. Donald (M) North Alabama 

Phillips, Samuel B. (M) South Indiana 

Phipps, James (M) West Virginia 

Pickett, Mrs. Elizabeth (M) North Georgia 

Pinaire, Edward (M) South Indiana 

Pinesett, Patricia S. (M) Florida 

Pittard, Joe ( M ) North Georgia 

Plowman, Howard L. (M) Oklahoma 

Poe, George (M) Missouri West 

Pope, Alton R. (M) Kansas East 

Pope, J. W., Jr. (M) Virginia 

Post, John E. (M) Southern New England 

Potts, Edgar A. (M) Virginia 

Praetorius, E. R. (E) Minnesota 

Prakash, Jyoti ( M ) Lucknow 

Prasad, Jones C. (M) Lucknow 

Prater, Arnold (M) Missouri West 

Prather, Mary (M) Kansas West 

Pratt, Horace A. (M) Maine 

Price, James S. (M) Western North Carolina 

Pritchard, Llewelyn G. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Puckett, L. G., Jr. (M) Tennessee 

Pullen, Harry A., Jr. (M) Louisville 

Quick, William K. (M) North Carolina 

Quickel, Olive (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Radhakrishan, John (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Rae, Daisy (M) Detroit 

Ragsdale, Ray W. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Raja, Victor (M) South India 

Ralph, Janis S. (M) East Ohio 

Ramsing, Niels J. (M) Denmark 



148 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Ranch, Ezra H. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ransom, E. C. (M) North Texas 

Rathod, Raijibhai (M) Gujarat 

Ratnam, Darsi J. (M) Bombay 

Ready, Judson W. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Reames, David H., Jr. (M) Virginia 

Reed, James (E) West Virginia 

Reed, Watford (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Reed, William B. (M) New York 

Reese, David W., Jr. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Reid, William. W. (M) Wyoming 

Reinhardt, Halsey (M) Wisconsin 

Reynolds, Paul C. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Rhinesmith, John G. (M) Troy 

Rice, Calvin C. (M) Minnesota 

Richardson, John W. (M) West Ohio 

Richardson, Sam (E) Minnesota 

Richter, Kurt (E) South Germany 

Rickey, Henry A. (M) Louisiana 

Rider, John R. (M) Southern Illinois 

Riedel, Gerhard (M) German Democratic Republic 

Riley, James L. (M) Texas 

Ripley, John E. (M) Holston 

Riskedal, R. Kenneth (M) Northern Illinois 

Ritchey, William H. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Ritter, Edwin ( M ) Iowa 

Ritter, Philip M. (M) Tennessee 

Robertson, Vernard E. (M) South Georgia 

Robinson, Forrest J. (M) Kansas West 

Robinson, Frank J. (M) Texas 

Robinson, Richard H. (M) Texas 

Robinson, Russell R. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Robinson, Mrs. Stanley C. (M) Central New York 

Robinson, William T. (M) Detroit 

Robison, John W. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Robison, Roger (M) Yellowstone 

Rodda, William F. B. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Roelke, Mrs. Paul L. (E) North Indiana 

Rohmann, Kurt M. (M) Switzerland (M) 

Roker, Donald R. (E) Nebraska 

Rollins, William B. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Roney, Hei-man F. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Rooks, Frank (M) Texas 

Ross, Mrs. Martha (M) Baltimore 

Rosser, Mrs. Ellen (M) Tennessee 

Rote, G. Eugene (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Roudebush, Roy R. (M) North Indiana 

Roughton, William W. (M) Florida 

Rountree, Alvin (M) Central Illinois 

Rouse, C. R. (M) Kentucky 

Rowbotham, Eugene B. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Rowe, J. Edgar (M) Virginia 

Rowsam, Robert H. (M) Western New York 

Russell, E. A. ( E ) Louisville 

Russell, Mrs. H. M. (M) Holston 

Russell, John W. (M) Oklahoma 

Russell, Roger E. (M) Iowa 

Ruth, Dale L. (M) Peninsula 

Rutland, John E. (M) North Alabama 

Ryan, Mrs. Paul (E) West Virginia 

Rymph, Levi (M) Kansas West 



The United Methodist Church 149 

Sageser, David B. (M) West Ohio 

Saito, Perry H. (M) Wisconsin 

Salem, Joe T. (M) Northwest Texas 

Sales, Philip N. (M) Western North Carolina 

Sampson, Charles T. (E) West Ohio 

Sander, Harvey (M) South Dakota 

Sanford, Terry (M) North Carolina 

Sansano, Lauro O. (M) Northwest Philippines 

Sargeant, John B. (M) Florida 

Sasaki, James K. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Savery, Gilbert M. (E) Nebraska 

Sawyer, John R. ( E ) Virginia 

Schalla, Eeinhard A. (E) Northwest Germany 

Schilling, Kurt H. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Schlechte, Erhard (E) German Democratic Republic 

Schroder, Harry (M) German Democratic Republic 

Schupp, Oscar G. (M) Missouri East 

Schivaiger, Walter ( E ) South Germany 

Seals, Taylor (M) Kentucky 

Sears, Miss Nancy L. (M) Iowa 

Seaxvell, William A., Sr. (M) North Carolina 

Seay, John W. (M) West Ohio 

Sebert, Lowell E. (M) West Virginia 

Selby, Mrs. Cora (M) Peninsula 

Self, Edgar (M) North Alabama 

Self, Nancy (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Selleck, Richard A. (M) West Michigan 

Sham, Roa, Prabhakar D. (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Shaner, Harry E. (M) California-Nevada 

Shannon, Charles E. (M) Western North Carolina 

Sharp, William L. (M) North Mississippi 

Sheaffer, Lee B. (E) Virginia 

Sheldon, Mark (M) Central Illinois 

Shelnutt, Dumas B. (M) North Georgia 

Shepherd, William M. (M) Little Rock 

Sherrill, Marion J. (M) North Georgia 

Shields, Joe (M) West Ohio 

Shindany, Joseph N. (M) Southern Congo 

Shinn, Ridgway F., Jr. (M) Southern New England 

Shipley, James W. (M) Baltimore 

Shipman, Joseph C. (M) Western New York 

Shipp, Thomas J. (M) North Texas 

Shirah, A. Jason (M) South Georgia 

Shockley, John R. (M) Peninsula 

Shopshire, James E. (M) Iowa 

Shoultz, Jack W. (M) Texas 

Shover, Donald R., Jr. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Shuler, James E. (M) Central Texas 

Shuman, Charles W. (M) Central Illinois 

Shunk, Ralph K. (M) West Ohio 

Shyamlal, L. B. (M) Lucknow 

Siegfried, Peter M. (M) Switzerland (M) 

Siess, Robert J. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Simons, William B. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Singh, Baldeo (M) Agra 

Singh, Dharamjit (M) Agra 

Singh, Fowler M. (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Singh, Jai (M) Lucknow 

Singh, Joseph B. (M) Gujarat 

Singh, Joseph G. (M) North India 

Singh, Lamuel Lai (M) Agra 



150 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Singh, Prem P. (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Singh, Ratan K. ( M ) Madhya Pradesh 

Singh, Ratbhan (M) Lucknow 

Singh, Robert M. (M) Lucknow 

Sinha, Miss Satyavati S. (M) Moradabad 

Sink, Archie (M) Western North Carolina 

Slider, W. W. (M) Louisville 

Slover, Donald L. (M) Missouri East 

Smart, Rosemund A. North India 

Smith, Aubrey B. (M) Mississippi 

Smith, Carlos J. R. (M) North Arkansas 

Smith, H. Travers (M) Maine 

Smith, Harvey J. (M) Western North Carolina 

Smith, J. Castro (E) Holston 

Smith, Lowell (M) Southern Illinois 

Smith, Norbert W. (M) Detroit 

Smith, Rex C. (E) West Ohio 

Smith, Robert M. (M) (14) Western North Carolina 

Smith, Rossing (M) West Virginia 

Smith, Stanley J. (M) West Virginia 

Smith, William E. (M) West Ohio 

Smoot, Jewell M. (M) Detroit 

Snead, Dr. James G. (M) Virginia 

Snow, Dudley V. (M) Louisiana 

Snyder, Sydney (M) California-Nevada 

Sohl, Mrs. Lowell (E) Rocky Mountain 

Soiland, Gustav (M) Norway 

Sonnenday, Mrs. Margaret (M) Missouri East 

Sorensen, Earl (M) West Michigan 

Soxman, Lee F., Jr. (M) Missouri West 

Sparks, John R. (M) Texas 

Spencer, Lester H. (M) Alabama- West Florida 

Spoor, Ralph E. (M) New York 

Sprecher, Mrs. Delia (E) (10) Wisconsin 

Spruce, Miss Susan (M) Southwest Texas 

Stambach, Paul E. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Stamp, Mrs. Carl (M) Western New York 

Stansbury, William B., Jr. (M) Baltimore 

St. Clair, Ben B. (M) Holston 

Steel, C. E. (M) South Georgia 

Steele, Clay (M) Northern Illinois 

Steele, Ralph S. (M) North Indiana 

Steele, William S. (M) Holston 

Steger, Clarence D. (M) Florida 

Stein, Neil L. (M) Missouri East 

Stengel, Jack (E) South Dakota 

Stephenson, Roy C. (M) Memphis 

Stephenson, Sheldon B. (M) Central New York 

Stephenson, William T. (M) North Texas 

Stetler, Roy H., Jr. (E) Baltimore 

Stevens, Donald (M) Wisconsin 

Stevens, Robert W. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Steward, Jack, Jr. (M) Central Texas 

Stewart, Mrs. Mary (M) Southern New England 

Stockwell, Eugene L. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Stolp, Richard L. (M) Central Illinois 

Stone, Meredith C. (M) New Mexico 

Stovall, Travis (M) New Mexico 

Stratton, Leslie M., Ill (M) Memphis 

Streyfeller, David E. (M) Iowa 

Strong, Donald T. (M) West Michigan 



The United Methodist Church 151 

Strother, W. Bruce (M) Tennessee 

Suarez, Reynaldo L. (M) Middle Philippines 

Sublette, Roy T. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Sugden, Mrs. Virgil (M) Nebraska 

Sukovaty, Norbert (E) Nebraska 

Summer our, William F. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Summers, Claude (M) Kansas West 

Summers, James A. (M) Western North Carolma 

Summers, James L. (M) South Carolma (1866) 

Sioeet, Charles R. (M) Minnesota 

Swinney, John R, (M) Missouri West 

Talbott, Norbert L. (M) South Indiana 

Tamkin, R. Naymon (M) Virginia 

Tanner, Mrs. Guy (M) North Texas 

Tanner, Ralph M. (M) North Alabama 

Tarver, Russell E. (M) South Dakota 

Taylor, George C. (M) California-Nevada 

Taylor, Jack (M) East Ohio 

Taylor, Jo (M) California-Nevada 

Taylor, Robert L. (M) North Georgia 

Teeter, Bonner E. (M) Oklahoma 

Tennant, John W. (M) West Michigan 

Thomas, Miss Aley (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Thomas, Robert B. (M) Troy 

Thompson, Bishop S. (M) Westeni Pennsylvania 

Thompson, James N. (M) North Georgia 

Thorne, Ralph (M) Kansas West 

Thurston, Elwyn O. (M) Oklahoma 

Timberlake, Richard H. (M) Holston 

Tisdale, Mrs. Inez S. (M) Florida 

Titus, D. P. (M) Lucknow 

Togba, Joseph N. (M) Liberia 

Tooley, Wendell (M) Northwest Texas 

Torrance, Calvin TF. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Townsley, Mrs. E. B. (M) Delhi 

Treese, Donald H. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Trenary, Mrs. Phyllis (E) West Ohio 

Trost, Mrs. Alice (M) Troy 

Trotter, Clifford E. (M) Northwest Texas 

Troy, Mrs. Olin H. (M) Holston 

Tubb, John (M) Louisiana 

Tuck, Claude (M) North Georgia 

Tucker, Frank C, Jr. (M) Missouri East 

Tuttle, G. Richard (M) Pacific Northwest 

Tuttle, Robert G. (M) Western North Carolina 

Tyler, Charles A. (M) South Indiana 

Tyree, E. C. (M) Kansas West 

Uhlinger, James R. (M) Southern New England 

Underbill, Mrs. Lee (M) Iowa 

Underwood, Walter L. (M) North Texas 

Uppinghouse, Mrs. Leonard (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Vanderbilt, Chester W. (M) Troy 

Vandy Rogers, Joseph B. (E) Sierra Leone 

Variiell, Sam N. (M) Holston 

Vaughn, Robert L. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Veale, William H. (M) New York 

Vereen, Mrs. LaFon C. (M) North Carolina 

Vosburg, Frederick C. (M) Detroit 



152 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Wagner, Gei'ald D. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Wagner, Joseph H. (M) (deceased) Missouri East 

Wake, Lloyd K. (M) California-Nevada 

Walder, Gerald V. (E) Minnesota 

Walker, Clarence (M) North Indiana 

Walker, E. C. (M) Missouri West 

Walker, H. T. (M) Minnesota 

Walker, Marion R. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Walker, William O. (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Wallace, Charles I., Sr. (M) Baltimore 

Wallace, Miss Lillian (M) Lucknow 

Waller, R. W. (E) Tennessee 

Walton, Donald W. (M) East Ohio 

Ward, Irma H. (M) Detroit 

Ward, Robert P. (M) Detroit 

Ward, Truman L. (M) Louisiana 

Ware, H. Melton ( M ) Florida 

Washington, Donald S. (M) Lucknow 

Watkins, R. Beverly (M) Virginia 

Watson, Harvey L. (M) North Carolina 

Watt, George, Jr. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Weaver, Dorothy S. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Weaver, Harold (M) Wisconsin 

Weaver, R. Bruce (M) North Texas 

Weber, Benjamin (M) Peninsula 

Weber, Oskar (E) Southwest Germany 

Wedar, Torsten E. V. (M) Sweden 

Weeks, Monroe T. (M) Liberia 

Wells, Charles E. (M) Oklahoma 

West, C. Eugene (M) Florida 

West, Cameron P. (M) North Carolina 

White, Joseph A. (E) Central Illinois 

White, L. L. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Whitehead, Claude W. (M) North Alabama 

Whitenack, Weldon A. (M) Iowa 

Whiting, Thomas A. (M) North Georgia 

Whitmore, Austin R. (M) West Ohio 

Whitten, Mrs. Dolphus, Jr. (M) Oklahoma 

Whittle, Paul O. (M) Northern Illinois 

Wiant, Howard J. (M) East Ohio 

Wilcox, Mrs. Barbara B. (M) Florida 

Wilcox, Wilbur F. (M) Iowa 

Wiley, Carl L. (E) West Ohio 

Wilke, Richard B. (M) Kansas West 

Wilkins, Howell 0. (M) Peninsula 

Williams, Mrs. Beryl (M) Baltimore 

Williams, Charles R. (M) North Georgia 

Williams, Mrs. Charles S. (M) Northern New York 

Williams, Harley M. (M) Western North Carolina 

Williams, Ira E., Jr. (M) New Mexico 

Williams, J. C. (M) North Indiana 

Williams, John R. (M) East Ohio 

Williams, L. Stanley (M) Central Texas 

Williams, Paul G. (M) Iowa 

Williams, Raymond (M) North Texas 

Willmeth, Robert T. (E) Kansas East 

Willson, J. M., Jr. (M) Northwest Texas 

Wilmoth, Rodney E. (M) Nebraska 

Wilson, Earl R. (M) Mississippi 

Winchester, Clarence M. (M) Western North Carolina 

Winne, Don W. (M) California-Nevada 



The United Methodist Church 153 

Winter, Hauser (M) Missouri West 

Winter, J. Britian (E) Baltimore 

Wolf, Wilmert H. (E) New York 

Womack, Mark (M) Holston 

Wood, T. Clay (M) Virginia 

Woodbury, Harvey (M) Maine 

Woodfield, Harry (M) Wyoming 

Woods, Prenza L. (M) Southwest Texas 

Wooldridge, W. N. Charles (M) Great Britain 

Woolsey, R. W. (M) Southwest Texas 

Wooten, Mrs. H. L. (M) Texas 

Workman, W. D., Jr. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Worthington, Mrs. Harley R. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Wright, Sargent J. (M) California-Nevada 

Wusterbarth, Harold J. (M) Troy 

Wyckoflf, Aloha (M) Pacific Northwest 

Wykle, Eugene M. (E) Northern Illinois 

Yeatts, Earnest (M) Holston 

Yeilding, N. Manly, Jr. (M) North Alabama 

Yeo, J. Wendell (M) Southern New England 

Young, Carl E. (E) Baltimore 

Young, Harry E. (M) Iowa 

Young, Mrs. lola (M) North Dakota 

Zagray, Allan H. (E) East Ohio 

Zebarth, Herbert E. (E) Wisconsin 

Zellmer, Willard (M) Pacific Northwest 

Zentz, Franklin M. (M) Western New York 

Zimmer, John A. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Zimmerman, Paul (E) Northern Illinois 

Zimmerman, Richard P. (E) Central Pennsylvania 



STANDING 
LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES 

No. 1 
CHRISTIAN SOCIAL CONCERNS 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 

relating to social issues and all interests and activities of the Boards 

of Christian Social Concerns. 

Chairman — Edsel Amnions Northern Illinois 

Vice-Chairman — Tom Reavley Southwest Texas 

Secretary — Everett Jones Baltimore 

Place of Meeting: Room 101, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Adduro, Pablo M. (M) Northern Philippines 

Ammons, Edsel A. (M) Northern Illinois 

Anderson, Barry H. (M) North Alabama 

Earnhardt, Mrs. Lurleen G. (M) Western North Carolina 

Bosley, Harold A. (M) New York 

Bristah, James W. (M) Detroit 

Cain, Mrs. James S. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Collins, Claude R. (M) West Virginia 

Cooke, George W. (M) Western New York 

Cooke, Mrs. Monroe (M) East Ohio 

Cooper, Kenneth (M) Alabama- West Florida 

Cox, Miss Sarah (M) West Ohio 

Cuff, G. Wayne (M) Peninsula 

Current, Gloster C. (M) New York 

Davis, George (E) North Indiana 

Davis, Hooker D. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Doggett, Herbert L. D. (M) Baltimore 

Doggett, John N., Jr. (M) Missouri East 

Dolliver, James (M) Pacific Northwest 

Dunlap, G. Alan (M) Nebraska 

Easley, John (E) South Indiana 

Eckstein, D. D. Herbert (E) West Berlin 

Egan, Jim A. (M) Oklahoma 

Ellis, Edwin L. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ellis, Matt L. (M) North Arkansas 

Eutsler, R. Kern (M) Virginia 

Evatt, Parker (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Farley, Thomas K. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Fereira Dias, Nobre Pereira (M) Angola 

Fischer, Dr. Heinz P. (M) South Germany 

Hagiya, Paul H. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Hampton, Mrs. Mary (M) Missouri West 

Hanna, Mrs. Ellen (M) Central Illinois 

Harkness, Georgia (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Harriger, Harold 0. (M) Northwest Texas 

Henderson, William R. (M) Western North Carolina 

154 



The United Methodist Church 155 

Henry, Willia^n R. (M) Oklahoma 

Hodapp, Leroy C. (M) South Indiana 

Holland, Betty Lou (M) Northern New Jersey 

Hunt, Kenneth W. (M) West Ohio 

Iwig, James H. (E) Kansas West 

Jones, Everett (M) Baltimore 

Karls, Harold M. (M) Detroit 

Kemper, John Q. (M) Kentucky 

Kerber, Phil (M) Iowa 

Knox, James L. (M) Florida 

Lewis, W. Robert (M) North Alabama 

Mahon, Eldon B. (M) Central Texas 

Mann, Robert (M) Central New York 

Matheny, Thomas H. (M) Louisiana 

McRae, Frank L. (M) Memphis 

Melius, Arthur R. (M) Troy 

Mercer, Charles H. (M) North Carolina 

Michelmann, Heinrich (M) Southwest Germany 

Moon, Robert W. (M) California-Nevada 

Moore, Lester L. (M) Iowa 

Mullick, Pravash R. (M) Bengal 

Outler, Albert C. (M) North Texas 

Peter, Victor (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Pittenger, Richard (M) South Dakota 

Prince, Frank H. (M) North Georgia 

Reavley, Tom (M) Southwest Texas 

Revels, Percy B. (M) Florida 

Roberts, Mrs. William T. (M) Tennessee 

Robinson, Albert (M) East Ohio 

Schneeberger, Vilem (M) Czechoslovakia 

Schneidereit, Harry (M) . Annual Conf. Of German Democratic Rep. 

Schreiber, Lyle J. (E) Minnesota 

Schwiebert, Erwin H. (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Seals, Woodrow ( M ) Texas 

Singer, Edgar F. (M) Wyoming 

Soderberg, John C. (M) Yellowstone 

Springmayi, Thomas R. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Stanley, David L. (M) Southern Illinois 

Stanley, Miles (E) West Virginia 

Stumbo, John E. (M) Kansas East 

Tate, Godfrey L. (M) Virginia 

Tholin, Richard D. (E) Northern Illinois 

Tombaugh, Reid (M) Central Illinois 

Truitt, Richard O. (M) Wisconsin 

Vandegriff, Paul M. (M) West Ohio 

White, E. McKinnon (M) Southern New England 

Wilcox, Katherine W. (M) West Michigan 

Wilcox, Robert L. (M) Holston 

Wilson, Frank S. (M) Holston 



156 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Wolf, John D. (M) North Indiana 

Woomer, James A. (E) Western Pennslyvania 

Yarbrough, George M. (M) North Mississippi 

Yeargan, Mrs. Victor (M) North Georgia 

Zorn, George L. (M) South Georgia 

No. 2 
CONFERENCES 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the interests ayid activities of the General, Jurisdictional, 
Annual, Provisional Aiinual, District and Missionary Conferences 
and to the structure of Program Councils. All petitions, resolutions, 
etc., relating to Central Conferences shall be referred to the Commis- 
sion on the Structure of Methodism Overseas. 

Chairman — Leonard D. Slutz West Ohio 
Vice-Chairman — Jerry G. Bray Virjginia 
Secretary — Edward G. Carroll Baltimore 

Place of Meeting: Room 306, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Ammerman, Carl R. (M) Detroit 

Aviha, Mike (M) Rio Grande 

Beatty, William M. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Blackburn, Robert M. (M) Florida 

Blake, Bruce P. (M) Kansas West 

Bonds, Alfred B. (M) East Ohio 

Bray, Jerry G. (M) Virginia 

Bruce, S. Duane (M) Northwest Texas 

Bryant, Thomas (M) South Indiana 

Cain, Richard I^. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Caldwell, Gilbert H., Jr. (M) Southern New England 

Carroll, Edward G. (M) Baltimore 

Coffman, Floyd H. (M) Kansas East 

Cotton, William Davis (M) Louisiana 

Curtis, Myers B. (M) North Arkansas 

Danforth, Merrill A. (M) Maine 

DeWitt, Jesse R. (M) Detroit 

Dodson, Thurman L. (M) Baltimore 

Dunn, Merle A. (E) Minnesota 

Fant, Glenn (M) North Mississippi 

Ferris, Mrs, E. L. (M) Nebraska 

Finkbeiner, Melvin M. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Firestone, Lyman (M) Missouri West 

Fisher, Albert F. (M) North Carolina 

Forbes, J. Kenneth (M) South Indiana 

Goens, Ray W. (M) Texas 

Goodwin, Burnie C, Jr. (M) New Mexico 

Grogan, Roy J. (M) Central Texas 



The United Methodist Church 157 

Hall, Carl C. (M) Little Rock 

Holbrook, Donald E. (M) West Michigan 

Homer, Robert L. (M) Central New York 

Hood, Robin P. (M) Western North Carolina 

Hostetter, Mark J. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hottle, Darrell (M) West Ohio 

Hulit, Kenneth W. (E) East Ohio 

James, William M. (M) New York 

Jarvis, Charles S. (M) Northern Hlinois 

Jenkins, H. James (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Jones, Gerald H. (M) North Indiana 

Kimbrough, R. Edwin (M) North Alabama 

Laraba, Forest W. (M) New Hampshire 

Lee, Ernest W. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Lightner, A. LeRoy (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Lindgren, Alvin J. (M) Wisconsin 

Lowe, Donald L. (M) Southern Illinois 

Mann, Mrs. Harold L. (M) North Carolina 

Merrow, Arthur S. (M) Western New York 

Miles, Denver L. (E) West Virginia 

Moeller, Romane G. (E) Rocky Mountain 

Moore, Eugene J. (E) Central Illinois 

Murray, Jerry D. (M) Western North Carolina 

Nestler, Frank H. (M) Central Illinois 

Oshorn, John F. (E) West Ohio 

Pitcher, Philip N. (M) Wyoming 

Preusch, Robert W. (M) New York 

Randolph, Allan H. L. (M) Louisville 

Redstone, Ray L. (M) Florida 

Riddick, Roland P. (M) Virginia 

Satterfield, John C. (M) Mississippi 

Shamblin, J. Kenneth (M) Texas 

Shearer, Daniel L. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Shearer, Paul V. ( M ) Iowa 

Shoemaker, Wayne E. (M) Iowa 

Sites, Mrs. Robert L. (E) North Indiana 

Slutz, Leonard D. (M) West Ohio 

Smith, Eugene L. ( M ) Northern New Jersey 

Smith, Holiday (M) Holston 

Sprouls, J. Clifton (M) Oklahoma 

Sweazy, Albert W. (M) Kentucky 

Thurman, Arthur V. (M) California-Nevada 

Vickers, John E. (M) Alabama- West Florida 

Walker, James M. (M) Southwest Texas 

Warman, John B. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Watson, Martha B. (M) North Texas 

Webb, Paul, Jr. (M) North Georgia 

Whitaker, George W. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Williams, George F. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Wright, George A. (M) South Georgia 

Yancey, Charles L. (M) Memphis 



158 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

No. 3 
EDUCATION 

To this committee shall he referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the interests and activities of the Boards of Education 
and Commission on Archives and History. 

Chairman — John T. King Southwest Texas 
Vice-Chairman — J. R. Nelson East Ohio 
Secretary — Benjamin R. Oliphint Louisiana 

Place of Meeting: Room 204, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Ake, Mrs. Frank W. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Allison, John R. ( M) Tennessee 

Armstrong, Mrs. Robert (M) Iowa 

Bailey, Wesley (M) Western North Carolina 

Bell, Raymond M. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Boda, Harold L. (E) West Ohio 

Borger, Clarence J. (M) Kansas West 

Bozeman, W. Scott (M) Florida 

Brown, William E. (M) New York 

Bums, Alden B. (M) West Michigan 

Calkins, Raoul C. (M) West Ohio 

Carter, Earl B. (M) North Arkansas 

Clem, Paul L. (M) North Alabama 

Cuaresma, Consuelo O. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Dailey, Charles M. (M) East Ohio 

Dennis, Gordon (M) Central Texas 

Dille, Robert E. (E) West Virginia 

Dodge, Carlton S. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Eaton, Harry B. (M) Virginia 

Eldridge, Edgar A. (M) Holston 

Fechtig, Norman (E) Southern Illinois 

Fisher, James A., Sr. (M) Memphis 

Garrett, C. Dendy (M) Iowa 

Gates, Merrill (E) Northern Illinois 

Geible, Merrell D. (E) North Indiana 

Gridley, Dorothy R. (M) Minnesota 

Gurtner, Miss Charlotte (M) Central Illinois 

Hager, Cornelius R. (M) Kentucky 

Hamilton, Richard E. ( M ) South Indiana 

Hardcastle, James C. (M) Peninsula 

Hayes, Clare J. (M) Kansas East 

Hoffman, Mrs. Richard (M) West Virginia 

Holmes, Zan W., Jr. (M) North Texas 

Hopkins, Martin W. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Humphrey, John D., Sr. (M) North Mississippi 



The United Methodist Church 159 

James, William E. (M) Louisville 

Johnson, Joseph T. (M) Northern Illinois 

Johnson, Richard O. (M) . California-Nevada 

Johnston, Kenneth C. (M) Missouri West 

Kim, Thomas K. (M) Northwest Texas 

King, John T. (M) Southwest Texas 

Kleszczynski, Adam (M) Poland 

Kruse, Lowen V. (M) Nebraska 

Lanning, Dean A. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Lee, Vernon (M) Northern New York 

Lesher, Mrs. Rosalind M. (E) Western New York 

Little, Mrs. Alvirita (M) Pacific Northwest 

Mack, James (M) South Carolina (1866) 

Matheny, Robert M. (M) Mississippi 

McAdams, Charles K. (M) North Carolina 

McDavid, Joel D. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Miller, Isaac H. (M) Western North Carolina 

Moore, Richard V. (M) Florida 

Muelder, Walter G. (M) Southern New England 

Muteteke, Paul (M) Southern Congo 

Myers, T. Cecil (M) North Georgia 

Nelson, J. R. (M) ...:... East Ohio 

Ngoi, Maurice (M) North Katanga 

Odom, Warren G. (M) Central New York 

Oliphint, Benjamin R. (M) Louisiana 

Peters, Lloyd A. (M) Oklahoma 

Potthoff, Harvey H. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Preston, Alice (M) Southwest 

Price, Robert R. (M) Oklahoma 

Ragland, James (M) Detroit 

Randolph, Willie B. (M) Texas 

Roberts, Harold (M) Great Britain 

Robertson, Frank L. (M) South Georgia 

Robey, William T., Jr. (M) . Virginia 

Sease, Gene E. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Spears, R. Wright (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Stanger, Frank B. ( M ) Southern New Jersey 

Strosahl, M. Stanford (M) Wisconsin 

Stuckey, Paul E. (E) West Ohio 

Thornburg, Robert W. (M) Central Illinois 

Westphal, Wilhelm F. (E) Northwest Germany 

Wheatley, Melvin E., Jr. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

White, Luther W., Ill (M) Virginia 

Will, Mary K. (M) Baltimore 

Wilson, Charles E., Jr. (M) North Georgia 

Yingling, L. Carroll (M) Baltimore 



160 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

No. 4 

LAY ACTIVITIES AND CHURCH 
FINANCE 

To this committee shall he referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the interests to lay activities and the Boards of the 
Laity; and relating to trustees, properties, church finance {general 
and local). 

Chairman — Thomas P. Moore East Ohio 
Vice-Chairman — John H. Rixse, Jr. Virginia 
Secretary — Thomas Rupert Kansas West 

Place of Meeting: Room 305, St. Mark United Methodist Church 

(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 

church membership) 

Adams, Quenton D. (M) Central Alabama 

Amark, Curt (M) Sweden 

Babcock, John (M) West Michigan 

Bailey, Joe N., Jr. (M) North Mississippi 

Baker, Leo L. (M) North Texas 

Barnes, Ambrose (M) Agra 

Bengers, Vincent (M) Bombay 

Bertholf, Lloyd M. (M) Central Illinois 

Bibay, Francisco A., Jr. (M) Mindanao 

Bittner, Dwight M. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Black, Clair W. (Mr.) (M) Northern New Jersey 

Bumpers, E. Clay (M) North Arkansas 

Cabrera, Ismael (M) Puerto Rico 

Calbert, Wayne F. (M) Mississippi (FCJ) 

Cochran, James D. (M) Detroit 

Crain, Dight W. (M) Southern New England 

Dekle, Joe B. (M) North Georgia 

DeLong, Dale F. (E) West Ohio 

Dennis, Charles C, Sr. (M) Liberia 

Devadanam, H. M. (M) South India 

DeVaux, Mrs. Thomas (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Doenges, William C. (M) Oklahoma 

Doering, Martin (M) West Berlin 

Edgar, Charles E. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Espie, John C. (M) Minnesota 

Fabian, Pedro F. (M) Northern Philippines 

Fagan, Harold (M) Texas 

Garrick, Grier L. (M) North Carolina 

Gausdal, Hans (M) Norway 

Glasgow, Francis M. (M) East Ohio 

Gordon, Harry M, (M) Wyoming 

Gsell, Theophil H. (M) Switzerland (M) 

Gundlach, Mrs. Elizabeth B. (M) Western New York 

Hancock, Maurice M. (M) Peninsula 

Hand, Don J. (M) Southwest Texas 



The United Methodist Church 161 

Hawkins, Donald (M) West Ohio 

Hawkins, J. Clinton (M) Missouri East 

Heisel, Eldred B. (E) West Ohio 

Heyde, Forest R. (E) North Indiana 

Hildebrancl, Will M. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Hitchock, William C. (M) Detroit 

Hook, Ralph C, Jr. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Hyatt, Carl B. (M) Western North Carolina 

Jenkins, Tom (M) Louisville 

Johansen, Frede (M) Denmark 

Jones, John B. (M) Baltimore 

Jordan, Roy M. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Kellam, Harold B. (M) Virginia 

Kellaway, John W. (M) Great Britain 

Kent, Harry R. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Lagawo, Richard E. S. (E) Sierre Leone 

Ledbetter, M. C. (M) Northwest Texas 

Lennartson, Walter (M) Northern Illinois 

Litton, Ray (M) Kentucky 

Long, Maurice K. (M) Iowa 

Marandi, Emmanuel (M) Bengal 

Marima, William (M) Rhodesia 

Montgomery, Edward (M) North Alabama 

Moore, Thomas P. (E) East Ohio 

Moorhead, Edwin E. (M) Mississippi 

Morrison, Mrs. Mary (M) Western North Carolina 

Naylor, E. R. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Netterville, G. Leon (M) Louisiana 

Obaugh, William R. (E) Florida 

Patrick, James T. (M) North Carolina 

Pevahouse, Joseph N. (M) Memphis 

Plummer, Kenneth H. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Poppe, Odin W. (E) Nebraska 

Praetorius, Herman R. (E) Pacific Northwest 

Presley, I. P. (M) Upper Mississippi 

Raoji, Ashok K. (M) Madhya Pradesh 

Rixse, John H., Jr. (M) Virginia 

Roberts, Sam (M) West Virginia 

Rose, Harold E. (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Rupert, Thomas (M) Kansas West 

Samson, Restitute F. (M) Northwest Philippines 

Schoenlein, Dr. Charles F. (M) Northern New York 

Shroyer, Lawton W. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Soderholm, Mrs. Patricia A. (M) Wisconsin 

Speer, Aubrey B. (M) Missouri West 

Stanton, Charles F. (E) South Indiana 

Staubach, William T., Jr. (M) New York 

Steele, Sam (M) New Mexico 

Steffner, John E., Sr. (M) Holston 

Stone, S. Lloyd ( M ) Tennessee 

Strickland, Don L. (M) Texas 

Sundin, Robert (E) North Dakota 



162 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 



Thomas, John J. (M) South Indiana 

Thompson, Everett K. (M) Southern Illinois 

Thornton, B. I. (M) South Georgia 

Underwood, Harry K. (M) Baltimore 

Vihendra Kumar, Maddala R. (M) Hyderabad 

Walker, J. Everett (M) California-Nevada 

Walker, Leon E. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Walker, Morris D. (M) Central Texas 

Waterfield, Donald A. (M) Troy 

Watson, Mrs. Olive E. (M) Florida 

Werder, Louise (M) North Katanga 

Wilson, T. R. (M) Georgia 

Wunderlich, Maria (M) Southwest Germany 



No. 5 
MEMBERSHIP AND EVANGELISM 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to church metnhership, including conditions, duties, and trans- 
fer thereof; relating to the interest and activities of the Boards of 
Evangelism. 

Chairman — Emerson S. Colaw West Ohio 
Vice-Chairman — Robert G. Mayfield Kentucky 
Secretary — Marvin A. Schilling Wisconsin 

Place of Meeting: Room 206, St. Mark United Methodist Church 

(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Allison, William F. (M) Missouri East 

Anderson, Walter F. (M) North Carolina 

Bailey, E. A. (M) North Mississippi 

Barton, Charles A. (M) New York 

Bashore, George W. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Bastain, Miss Mary Lee (M) South Indiana 

Batt, Samuel (E) Northern Illinois 

Blanchard, Hubert M. (M) Louisiana 

Bond, R. H. (M) Memphis 

Brawn, Melvin (E) California-Nevada 

Colaw, Emerson S. (M) West Ohio 

Courtney, Robert H. (M) East Ohio 

Culp, Jesse A. (M) North Alabama 

Curtis, Mrs. Albert (M) Central New York 

Davis, Carlos W. (M) Texas 

Detty, Darrell (E) West Ohio 

Duck, David A. (M) South Georgia 

Duncan, Edward L. (M) Detroit 

Enke, Karl-Heinz (E) . . Annual Conf. of German Democratic Rep. 



The United Methodist Church 163 

Faust, Carl W. (E) Iowa 

Featherston, R. Jack (M) Oklahoma 

Fisher, J. Herschel (M) North Texas 

Fogleman, C. M., Jr. (M) Kansas West 

Fulbright, Homer H. (M) North Arkansas 

Fulk, Floyd L. (E) Virginia 

Gray, C. Jarrett, Sr. (M) Missouri West 

Guiang, Condrado G. (M) Mindanao 

Gustafson, Laverne H. (E) Southern California-Arizona 

Hagood, Delma L. (M) North Georgia 

Harkness, Leonard L. (M) Minnesota 

Harris, Justin N. ( M ) Bombay 

Howe, Clarice (Mrs.) (M) Northern New Jersey 

Howell, Maggart B. (M) Central Texas 

Jerome, J. E. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Jones, Phil M. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Jordan, Bert (M) Mississippi 

Keller, Alfred L. (E) North Indiana 

Knecht, David F. (M) North Dakota 

Knupp, Robert E. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Larson, Gunnar E. (M) Sweden 

Lindqiiist, Harold F. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Madsen, Arnold (M) Norway 

Mayfield, Robert G. (M) Kentucky 

McCartt, James S. (M) Holston 

McDonell, C. Durward (M) Florida 

Meadows, William A. (M) Florida 

Metcalf, Kenneth E. (M) Iowa 

Modisher, Donald E. (M) Western New York 

Mossinger, Manfred ( E ) Southwest Germany 

Myers, David L. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Ogden, Mrs. Selma (M) Troy 

Page, S. Covey (M) Oklahoma 

Peters, Dr. C. Kenneth (M) Louisville 

Peterson, Arden M. (E) .West Michigan 

Pitcher, Dale E. (M) Central Illinois 

Poor, George L. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Potter, Truman W. (M) West Virginia 

Prigmore, L. T. (M) Holston 

Reitz, T. Russell (M) Kansas East 

Richer, George M. (M) Southwest Texas 

Riley, Sumpter M., Jr. (M) West Ohio 

Rohrbaugh, Laverne E. (E) Baltimore 

Schilling, Marvin A. (M) Wisconsin 

Sexton, Mrs. Joe (M) Tennessee 

Shepherd, Paul (M) Louisville 

Sims, R. Paul (M) Southern Illinois 

Smith, Alex J. (E) Sierre Leone 

Stewart, Martin B. (M) New Mexico 

Sticker, Hermann (E) South Germany 



164 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Tignor, Thomas P. (M) Virginia 

Tohler, Theophil J. (M) Switzerland (M) 

Urbom, Warren K. (M) Nebraska 

Wagner, Blake D. (E) East Ohio 

Weinberg, Stanley C, Jr. (M) Southern New England 

Weldon, Wilson O. (M) Western North Carolina 

Wilson, Robert L. (M) Alabama- West Florida 



No. 6 
CLERGY 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the clergy of the Church in all its forms, grades, and 
orders, and relating to all interests and activities of the Boards of 
Ministry. 

Chairman — James M. Ault Northern New Jersey 
Vice-Chairman — Ernest T. Dixon Southwest Texas 
Secretary — Mrs. Lamar Clark Texas 

Place of Meeting: Room 303, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Adkins, Leon M., Jr. (M) Troy 

Aguilar, Clifford B. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Akers, George R. (M) Wyoming 

Albertson, C. Gene (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Ault, James M. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Bailey, William P., Jr. (M) Memphis 

Baker, Eric W. (M) Great Britain 

Bender, Gordon R. (E) Wisconsin 

Bergland, John K. (E) West Ohio 

Bjork, Virgil V. (M) North Indiana 

Boyd, Marvin L. (M) Northwest Texas 

Bridges, Ramsey (M) West Virginia 

Buttimer, Thomas A. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Caswell, Bervin 0. (M) New Mexico 

Clark, Mrs. Lamar (M) Texas 

Clay, Willie B. (M) Northern Illinois 

Coffin, Wayne W. (M) Oklahoma 

Colpitts, A. Hunter (E) North Indiana 

Cooper, Joel A. (M) North Arkansas 

Corry, John G. (M) Tennessee 

Crutchfield, Finis A. (M) Oklahoma 

Cushman, Robert E. (M) North Carolina 

Bass, Christopher S. (M) Lucknow 

Dickhaut, Walter R., Sr. (M) West Ohio 

Dixon, Ernest T. (M) Southwest Texas 

Douglass, Carl H., Jr. (M) Virginia 

Ellis, S. Blake (M) Maine 

Epps, Anderson C. (M) Georgia 



The United Methodist Church 165 

Fetterman, Brian A. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Flinchhaugh, James E. (E) West Ohio 

Fridy, Wallace (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Gotz, Herbert (M) Annual Conf. of German Democratic Rep. 

Graham, John H. (M) Upper Mississippi 

Green, Horace H. (M) Kentucky 

Greemvaldt, Willimn M. (M) Central Texas 

Handy, W. T., Jr. (M) Louisiana 

Hardt, John W. (M) Texas 

Harrington, Richard W. (M) Western New York 

Hay ward, C. Douglas (M) California-Nevada 

Hildreth, Charles H. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Hollis, Robert R. (M) Southern Illinois 

Holter, Don W. (M) Kansas East 

Howes, John B. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Huston, Ralph B. (M) Florida 

Kelley, Robert W. (M) East Ohio 

Lamb, Raymond R. (M) Detroit 

Leggett, John W., Jr. (M) Mississippi 

Loyd, Harold W. (M) Central Illinois 

Martin, George W. (M) Little Rock 

Massey, Daniel B. (M) Moradabad 

Mattheiv, Glenn E. (M) Kansas West 

McCoy, Paul E. (M) Peninsula 

McCune, Robert J. (M) Central New York 

Meuschke, Paul J. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Moorhead, Frank (M) North Georgia 

Neese, William J. (M) North Carolina 

Newynan, M. Douglas (M) Virginia 

Nichols, Frank A. (M) Iowa 

Nicholson, R. Herman (M) Western North Carolina 

Northfelt, Merlyn W. (M) Northern Illinois 

Persons, William R. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Purdham, Charles B. (M) Minnesota 

Richards, Cecil T. (M) North India 

Roberts, Samuel T. (M) Liberia 

Rutter, Kenneth P. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Sackmann, Dieter A. (M) South Germany 

Spafford, Freda ( E ) Detroit 

Stevenson, Thomas F. (M) North Alabama 

Stokes, Mack B. (M) Holston 

Stroh, Byron F. (M) South Indiana 

Thornburg, Richard A. (M) New York 

Tolbert, Robert J. (M) . East Ohio 

Trice, William E. ( M) North Texas 

Trotter, F. Thomas (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Tuell, Jack M. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Unger, E. Paul (M) Central Illinois 

Van Brunt, F. Norman (M) Baltimore 



166 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Van Ornum, Carlton G. (M) Northern New York 

Vinluan, Victor C. (M) Northwest Philippines 

Waite, Alvis A., Jr. (M) South Georgia 

Wallace, William L., Jr. (M) North Mississippi 

Walley, F. Lewis (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ward, A. Sterling (M) Missouri West 

Ward, John W., Jr. (M) Missouri East 

Weems, Mrs. H. V. (M) Florida 

Wichelt, John F. (E) Nebraska 

Wilken, Alferd E. ( E) Iowa 

Wood, George S. (M) Louisville 

Wright, James W. (M) West Michigan 

Young, Robert T. (M) Western North Carolina 

Ziegler, Wilbur C. (M) Southern New England 

No. 7 
MISSIONS 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the interests and activities of the Boards of Missions. 

Chairman — Mrs. Jane Arterburn Louisville 
Vice-Chair yuan — R. Jervis Cooke Peninsula 
Secretary— Alva Clark Nebraska 

Place of Meeting: Room 205, St. Mark United Methodist Church 

(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Anderson, Mrs. Virgil (M) Rocky Mountain 

Arterburn, Mrs. Jane (M) Louisville 

Barto, Reta S. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Barton, Roy D. (M) Rio Grande 

Bautista, Ignacio P. (M) Philippines 

Biddle, Glenn H. (E) West Ohio 

Born, Mrs. Harry E. (M) Virginia 

Boswell, Hamilton T. (M) California-Nevada 

Bott, LeRoy A. (E) Kansas West 

Brogdon, Mrs. Elizabeth S. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Brooks, David W. (M) North Georgia 

Bryan, Monk (M) Missouri East 

Burrous, Mrs. Anita (M) North Indiana 

Butler, Randle (M) New Mexico 

Carr, Marvin H. (M) West Virginia 

Charan, Miss Sophie (M) Lucknow 

Chen, Peter F. (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Christianson, Lyle T. (M) Minnesota 

Clark, Alva H. (M) Nebraska 

Cooke, R. Jervis (M) Peninsula 

Cummings, Mrs. C. C. (M) Northern Illinois 

Cummins, Marlene (M) Southern Illinois 



The United Methodist Church 167 

Davenport, Mrs. E. T. (M) Little Rock 

Dodder, Robert T. (M) Iowa 

Eby, Mrs. Norma (M) Pacific Northwest 

Egger, Kirk (M) North Mississippi 

Evierson, Joe G. (M) South Indiana 

Ford, Floyd (M) Tennessee 

Gailey, Mrs. Beulah (M) Missouri West 

Gantz, Richard (M) Central Illinois 

Gibson, J. Nelson (M) North Carolina 

Gray, Mrs. Ethel M. (M) Florida 

Hedherg, Al A. (M) Florida 

Helms, Mrs. Roy (M) North Indiana 

Hines, Mrs. Thelma (E) Kansas East 

Hood, Esther (M) Yellowstone 

Hopkins, Mrs. Thomas J. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Howe, Robert C. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Hughes, Harold H. (M) Virginia 

Hutchinson, Charles L. (M) Central Alabama 

Jones, Bevel (M) North Georgia 

Lamb, Mrs. Wayne A. (M) Memphis 

Lang, Francis (M) East Ohio 

Lashford, Mrs. Edgar J. (M) Wyoming 

Linhoss, John C. (E) Virginia 

Lovern, J. Chess (M) Oklahoma 

Lundy, John T. (M) Holston 

Matthews, Mrs. Cecil R. (M) Northwest Texas 

Mayer, Paul 0. (M) East Ohio 

Mays, Avery (M) North Texas 

McCleskey, Wayne H. (M) Texas 

McCullough, Mrs. Ralph (M) Missouri East 

McDavid, Harry E. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

McDonald, Charles P. (M) North Arkansas 

McGowan, Mrs. Charles B. (M) Louisiana 

Meinhardt, Lydia (E) West Berlin 

Metzel, Mrs. George V. (M) Oklahoma 

Millet, Edmund A. W. (M) Western New York 

Montgomery, Allen D. (M) North Alabama 

Morton, Mrs. C. (M) Texas 

Naff, George E. (M) Holston 

Newman, Mrs. Rosalyn (M) West Michigan 

Norris, Irene (M) Detroit 

Ortman, Ervin (M) South Dakota 

Otwell, William (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Owens, J. Garfield (M) Southwest Texas 

Parker, Mrs. W. Roy (M) . South Carolina (1785) 

Patton, Luther A. (M) Troy 

Peter, M. Elia (M) Hyderabad 

Purnell, Eric C. (M) Central Texas 

Redding, Mrs. Viola (M) Western North Carolina 

Rivers, Mrs. J. R. (M) South Georgia 



168 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Roberts, Leigh (M) . Wisconsin 

Rogers, Mrs. Floyd (E) West Virginia 

Sears, Mrs. Edward E. (M) Iowa 

Skeete, F. Herbert (M) New York 

Smith, Harold F. (M) Southern New England 

Smith, Mrs. Marshall (M) Mississippi 

Stephens, Ralph L. (M) Northern New Jersey 

Stith, Forrest C. (M) Baltimore 

Totten, Mrs. Howard (M) Central New York 

Tullis, Edward L. (M) Kentucky 

Watson, Michael (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Watson, Mrs. Elizabeth (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Weston, Charles H. (M) West Ohio 

Wicklein, Mrs. Helen (M) Baltimore 

Wieting, Mrs. Wesley S. (M) Northern Illinois 

Wilcoxon, Francis (E) South Indiana 

Winton, Jeanette (M) New York 

Yocom, Donald R. (M) West Ohio 

Young, H. Claude (M) Western North Carolina 



No. 8 
PENSIONS 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the support of retired and supernumerary ministers, and 
of widows and dependent children of deceased ministers, not including 
bishops and all matters relating to pensions of lay employees of 
Church organizations, boards, agencies, or institutions and all interest 
and activities of the Boards of Pensions. 

Chairman — Paul D. Martin, Jr. Virginia 
Vice-Chairman — Frank L. Williams Baltimore 
Secretary — Allen M. Mayes Texas 

Place of Meeting: Chapel, St. Mark United Methodist Church 

(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Baskerville, M. Trevor (M) Iowa 

Blessing, Roy E. (E) West Virginia 

Brown, Rainsford A. (M) Iowa 

Carlson, Verner A. (E) North Indiana 

Carraway, James L. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Chiles, Paul D. (M) West Ohio 

Clymer, Merritt (E) East Ohio 

Cooke, Jack (M) Louisiana 

Crawford, Gene P. (E) South Indiana 

Creel, John (M) Alabama- West Florida 

Darling, Howard H. (M) New York 

Dement, Frank E., Jr. (M) Mississippi 



The United Methodist Church 169 

Early, Joyce V. (M) North Carolina 

Eberly, Edwin P. (E) East Ohio 

Eckel, Sherman B. (E) Western New York 

Edgar, Thomas A. (M) North Alabama 

Fisher, Harry J. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Gentry, Edd W. (M) Florida 

Good, Mary (M) Detroit 

Hann, Edwin P., Jr. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Hess, Wayne C. (E) Central Illinois 

Hickerson, Walter J. (M) Kansas West 

High, Henry R. (M) West Virginia 

Humphrey, L. A., Jr. (M) Texas 

Hyatt, Lochlan L. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Johnson, Harry L., II (M) Southern New England 

Lightner, George S. (M) Virginia 

Loyd, H. Brown (M) Central Texas 

McKay, James (M) North Georgia 

Madison, J. Clay (M) Western North Carolina 

Majors, R. Powell (M) Western North Carolina 

Mann, Charles L. (M) Baltimore 

Martin, Gordon (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Martin, Paul D., Jr. (M) Virginia 

Mayes, Allen M. (M) Texas 

Mayo, George W. (M) South Georgia 

Melgren, Wesley A. (E) Minnesota 

Momberg, Paul B. (M) West Ohio 

Moore, Manly M. (M) Oklahoma 

Quickel, Harold H. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ritter, Ralph M. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Robbins, Carl M. (M) Memphis 

Rabbins, Wilmer B. (M) Holston 

Rooks, John J. (M) Florida 

Ruff, William H. (M) North Georgia 

Taylor, Lawrence R. (E) West Michigan 

Walton, Herbert (M) Northern Illinois 

Webber, Frank (M) California-Nevada 

Williams, Frank L. (M) Baltimore 

Wilson, Winslow (M) Wisconsin 

Wright, M. Max (E) Kansas East 

No. 9 

COMMUNICATIONS AND 
PUBLICATIONS 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to all the Publications of The United Methodist Church and 
to the interests and activities of the Boards of Publications, the 
Commission on Public Relations and United Methodist Information 



170 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

and the Divisions of Interpretation and Television, Radio and Film 
Communication of the Program Council. 

Chairman — Charles A. Sayre Southern New Jersey 
Vice-Chairman — John B. Russell Virginia 
Secretary — Mabel E. Collins New York 

Place of Meeting: Room 202, St. Mark United Methodist Church 

(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Adams, Lloyd S., Jr. (M) Memphis 

Bane, Mrs. W. V. (M) Central Texas 

Barnes, H. K. (M) North Alabama 

Bethea, Joseph B. (M) "Western North Carolina 

Brabham, A. McKay (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Burrous, Kermit (M) North Indiana 

Cagna, Mrs. Betty (M) Missouri West 

Chaffee, Paul (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Chittum, John (M) East Ohio 

Codding, Charles, Jr. (M) Oklahoma 

Collins, Mabel E. (M) New York 

Droke, Clifford S. (M) California-Nevada 

Engel, Damon L. (M) West Virginia 

Fanning, O. B. (M) Florida 

Fowler, H. Thornton (M) Tennessee 

Franklin, Benson N. (M) North Alabama 

Frey, John H. (M) Nebraska 

Gilmore, Paul G. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Goodrich, Robert E., Jr. (M) North Texas 

Green, Mrs. Robert E. (M) South Indiana 

Gwyer, Herbert L. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Hamilton, Ronald R. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Hanks, Stanley G. (M) Minnesota 

Hann, Paul M. (M) Iowa 

Henderson, Zach S. (M) South Georgia 

Hozendorf, C. Ray (M) Little Rock 

Jenkins, Warren M. (M) South Carolina (1866) 

Jetter, Richard (E) South Germany 

Jones, George E. (M) Mississippi 

Kellow, M. Keith (M) Texas 

Kreager, Max W. (M) Iowa 

Lester, W. D. (M) Southwest 

Lusby, L. D. (E) Holston 

Matthaei, Marjorie (M) Kansas West 

McKenzie, Leon T. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Messmer, William K. (E) West Ohio 



The United Methodist Church 171 

Montgomery, John C, Jr. (M) Missouri East 

Muller, Walter W. (E) Central Illinois 

Nichols, Henry H. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Peters, James C. (M) Western North Carolina 

Petteway, Warren B. (M) North Carolina 

Richardson, Ted I. (M) Southwest Texas 

Rodeheffer, Calvin (M) West Ohio 

Russell, John B. (M) Virginia 

Rutland, Walter B. (M) Florida 

Sanders, Carl J. (M) Virginia 

Sanders, Felix J. (M) Louisville 

Sayre, Charles A. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Schiller, Theodore E. (M) Baltimore 

Stambach, Arthur W. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Stich, Seigfried (E) Switzerland (E) 

Stovall, James L. (M) Louisiana 

Thompson, Gordon G., Jr. (M) North Georgia 

Thompson, Lionel (M) Detroit 

Van Sickle, John R. (M) Northern Illinois 

Watts, Ewart G. (M) Kansas East 

White, Leonard (M) East Ohio 

Whitten, Dolphus, Jr. (M) Oklahoma 

Wilkinson, Donald (M) Wisconsin 

No. 10 
HEALTH AND WELFARE 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the interests and activities of the Boards of Health and 
Welfare Ministries and to all the eleemosynary work. 

Chairman — Joseph R. Graham West Ohio 
Vice-Chairman — D. Roscoe Buttrey Tennessee 
Secretary — C. Dale White Southern New England 

Place of Meeting: Room 203, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Adkins, Joel C. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Ariki, Joe (M) Rocky Mountain 

Blickenstaff, Thomas (E) Baltimore 

Booth, Glenn O. (M) California-Nevada 

Boyer, Gene (E) East Ohio 

Braun, Mrs. Paul (E) Iowa 

Buttrey, D. Roscoe (M) Tennessee 

Carson, Joseph T., Jr. (M) , Virginia 

Casad, Gordon D. (M) North Texas 

Cleveland, Millard C. (M) Florida 

] 



172 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Cockerille, Miss Clara (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Cotto-T homer, Alfredo (M) New York 

Davis, Sidney E. (E) Missouri West 

Dayal, Dr. Christo D. (M) Moradabad 

Decker, Mrs. E. Moore (M) Texas 

Downie, Dr. Gerald (M) Central Illinois 

Eich, Foster (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Froe, D. W. (M) West Virginia 

Graham, Joseph R. (E) West Ohio 

Hayes, Melvin (E) East Ohio 

Henderson, Mrs. Henry (M) West Ohio 

Hjelte, Marshall C. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Hughlett, William S. (M) Florida 

Kay, W. Eugene (E) Oklahoma 

Key, W. R. (M) South Georgia 

King, Arnold K. (M) North Carolina 

Latta, Lloyd A. (M) Iowa 

Lindsey, Julian A. (M) Western North Carolina 

Long, Carroll H. (M) Holston 

Marlow, H. Leroy (E) Central Pennsylvania 

McMahan, Donald F. (M) North Indiana 

Moore, Ray (M) North Georgia 

Rainwater, Henry M. (M) North Arkansas 

Rogers, Carleton C. (M) Northern Illinois 

Saito, Kazuo (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Shipps, Hammell P. (M) Southern New Jersey 

Sprecher, Mrs. Delia (E) Wisconsin 

Streeter, Emmett T. (M) Nebraska 

Susat, Edward (M) South Indiana 

Trotter, J. Irwin (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Walker, W. Roland (M) Virginia 

White, C. Dale (M) Southern New England 

White, Woodie W. (M) Detroit 

Wilshusen, Mrs. John (M) Southwest Texas 

Woodall, A. H. (M) North Alabama 

Woods, William F. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Zehner, Henry W. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

No. 11 
ECUMENICAL AFFAIRS 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the interests and activities of the Commission on Ecumeni- 
cal Affairs and all Inter-denominational activities, relations, interests 
and responsibilities of The United Methodist Church, including the 
American Bible Society, the National Council of Churches of Christ 



The United Methodist Church 173 

in the United States of America, the World Council of Churches and 
Committee on Religion in American Life. 

Chairman— Mrs. Wayne W. Harrington Nebraska 
Vice-C hail-man — John V. Moore California-Nevada 
Secretary — R. Benjamin Garrison Central Illinois 

Place of Meeting: Room 109, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates, (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Achberger, Mrs. Clarence E. (M) East Ohio 

Andrews, David H. (E) Baltimore 

Applegate, William P. (M) Iowa 

Babcock, Charles I. (M) Florida 

Blackstone, Franklin, Jr. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Burtner, Robert W. (M) Oregon-Idaho 

Byrd, William O. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Carlsen, Eigil ( M) Denmark 

Carruth, Mrs. Carlton (M) South Georgia 

de Freitas, Antonio Felipe (M) Angola 

Duffey, Paul A. (M) Alabama- West Florida 

Fichter, Joseph W. (M) West Ohio 

Galloway, Benedict A. (M) Louisiana 

Garrison, R. Benjamin (M) Central Illinois 

Gordon, Mrs. John W. (M) North Alabama 

Grove, William B. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Harriefeld, Fritz (E) Northw^est Germany 

Harrington, Mrs. Wayne W. (M) Nebraska 

Hartz, Mrs. Paul (M) Virginia 

Heacock, Jack D. (M) Southvi^est Texas 

Heckard, Cecil L. (M) Western North Carolina 

Hutchinson, Mildred (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Johnson, Richard E. (M) Kansas East 

Kalaf, Walter N. (M) Florida 

Kaputo, Elie M. (M) Southern Congo 

King, Mrs. Mary E. (M) Western North Carolina 

Kirchner, Frederick K. (M) Troy 

Koenig, Robert W. (E) South Indiana 

Krueger, Delton H. (M) Minnesota 

Kuehl, Werner E. (M) Northwest Germany 

Lai, James (M) Delhi 

Leonard, Mrs. James M. (M) West Ohio 

Lundy, Robert F. (M) Holston 

Mangum, Mrs. Orien (M) Peninsula 

Marvin, John E. (M) Detroit 

Mentzer, Warren F. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Mielke, Mrs. Sharon (E) Wisconsin 

Moore, John V. (M) California-Nevada 

Moore, LeRoy W. (M) Iowa 



174 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Nees, Forrest G. (M) East Ohio 

Paige, Mrs. Jean (M) West Virginia 

Parker, Richard S. (M) New York 

PfeiflFer, Mrs. A. B. (M) Northern Illinois 

Phillips, Randall C. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Pohl, Keith I. (M) West Michigan 

Rice, Spencer M. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Roberts, Sidney (M) Central Texas 

Roper, Wilbur F. (M) North Texas 

Sagar, Sisa Masih (M) Agra 

Samuel, S. K. (M) South India 

Shook, Wallace T. (M) Texas 

Shown, Mrs. Louise (M) North Indiana 

Silvers, Mrs. Floyd L. (M) Oklahoma 

Simpson, John C, Jr. (M) Virginia 

Standard, Forrest L. (M) Missouri West 

Styron, Mrs. Arthur (M) North Georgia 

Townsend, Samuel L. (M) North Carolina 

Warner, Earl D. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Webb, Pauline M, (M) Great Britian 



No. 12 

JUDICIAL ADMINISTRATION, ENABLING 
ACTS AND LEGAL FORMS 

To this com.tnittee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the formal disciplining, trial, and appeal of inembers and 
ministers of The United Methodist Church, and relating to the Judi- 
cial Council and the judicial procedure within the Church. This com- 
mittee shall also be charged with the responsibility of preparing and 
presenting, for adoption by the Co)iference, such enabling acts and 
legal forins as may be needed in the continuing process of unifying 
the interests and agencies of the Church. 

Chairman — Elias G. Galvan Southern California-Arizona 
Vice-Chairman — Mrs. Frances Hundley Wisconsin 
Secretary — Ronald W. Gilbert Oklahoma 

Place of Meeting: Room 210, St. Mark United Methodist Church 

(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Baass, Erich M. (M) Northwest Germany 

Barrett, James (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Beatty, W. Carroll (M) Baltimore 

Bell, Lester H. (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Campbell, Foy (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Carlton, Gordon B. (M) Little Rock 

Chapman, Dr. A. Frank (M) Peninsula 

Choy, Wilbur W. (M) California-Nevada 

Cooper, Earle N. (M) Troy 



The United Methodist Church 175 

Davis, Paul (M) Central Illinois 

Drennan, Merrill W. (M) Baltimore 

Dutt, Harold (E) West Ohio 

Entler, Fred P. (M) Holston 

Evans, Daniel F. (M) South Indiana 

Everhart, Mrs. Frank B. (M) West Virginia 

Galvan, Elias G. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Gilbert, Ronald W. (M) Oklahoma 

Grenfell, John N., Jr. (M) Detroit 

Harrington, Robert F. (M) Louisiana 

Hundley, Mrs. Frances (M) Wisconsin 

Hundley, George R. (M) North Alabama 

Jacobs, Harry H., Jr. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Jason, William C, Jr. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Jefferson, A. G. (M) Virginia 

Mann, Robert T. (M) Florida 

Mannasmith, Dr. Clarence H. (M) Iowa 

Mendigorin, Abdon (M) Philippines 

Mikkelsen, John H. (M) Nebraska 

Northrop, George M. (M) New York 

O'Hara, Delmar T. (M) East Ohio 

Parker, Robert P. (M) Virginia 

Paxton, James R. (M) Texas 

Redmond, Charles D. (E) West Ohio 

Renich, Paul W. (M) Kansas West 

Robbins, Gene E. (M) North Indiana 

Santana, Benjamin (M) Puerto Rico 

Scott, Ralph (M) Missouri West 

Seller, Ralph H. (M) Southwest Texas 

Sharpe, Guy (M) North Georgia 

Shaw, Inder A. (M) North India 

Stauffer, Eugene E. (M) Northern Illinois 

Tomlin, William H. (M) Tennessee 

Weaver, L. Stacy (M) North Carolina 

White, Charles D. (M) Western North Carolina 

No. 13 
LOCAL CHURCH 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the organization and duties of the various bodies within 
the local church. Proposed legislation emanating from other General 
Conference Committees concerning local church organization shall 
be referred to this committee on Local Church for consideration, 
action, and reporting to General Conference. 

Chairman — G. Ross Freeman South Georgia 

Vice-Chairman — Melvin G. Talbert Southern California-Arizona 

Secretary — ^Pauline Bobbitt Southern California- Arizona 



176 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Place of Meeting: Room 201, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 

Allin, Willard S. (M) Minnesota 

Barclift, Chancie D. (M) North Carolina 

Beeman, Paul J. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Bingham, Clifford (E) South Indiana 

Blackburn, Alfred B. (M) Florida 

Bobbitt, Pauline (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Bramlett, Sam C. (M) Texas 

Brandyherry, Abraham L. (E) East Ohio 

Brewer, Otho G., Jr. (M) Peninsula 

Bristow, Carroll D. (M) Baltimore 

Brown, Allen L. (M) Louisiana 

Byler, Robert A. (M) West Ohio 

Carrington, John E. (M) New York 

Catterall, Grace (M) California-Nevada 

Chadwick, Mrs. Dorothy (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Cochrun, Edgar (E) West Ohio 

Cole, Calvin H. (E) Central Pennsylvania 

Cromwell, Thomas L. (M) East Ohio 

Daugherty, Ruth M. (E) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Dickerson, Ellis R. (M) Alabama-West Florida 

Easter, Paul M. (M) Western Pennsylvania 

Fenn, G. Lemuel (M) Oklahoma 

Fink, Harold H. (M) Virginia 

Fishbeck, Royal B., Jr. (M) Troy 

Ford, Edwin C. (M) Western North Carolina 

Ford, Frank B. (M) New Mexico 

Freemayi, G. Ross (M) South Georgia 

Galbreath, Mrs. Charles (M) Central Illinois 

Geissbiihler, Theo (E) Switzerland (E) 

Gilts, George (E) West Ohio 

Grant, Nicholas W. (M) North Carolina 

Greenhaw, Frank (M) North Texas 

Hall, E. William (M) Baltimore 

Havemann, Gerhard (E) . Annual Conf. of German Democratic Rep. 

Hermann, Dr. Erich (E) Southwest Germany 

Hicks, Kenneth W. (M) Nebraska 

Horton, Robert E. (E) Detroit 

Houston, Jamie G. (M) North Mississippi 

Kadenge, Fannuel (M) Rhodesia 

Keeffe, Williain R. (M) New Hampshire 

LaSuer, Donald F. (M) North Indiana 

Lau, Clifford (M) Wisconsin 

Love, Elza L. (M) Texas 

Lutrick, Charles E. (M) Northwest Texas 

Malac, Vlastislav (M) Czechoslovakia 

Manns, Herbert (M) West Berlin 

McCall, Kenneth A. (M) Missouri West 



The United Methodist Church 177 

McCommons, Mrs. R. M. (M) North Georgia 

Mcintosh, Mrs. Hilda (M) Kansas East 

McMillan, Mrs. Norris (M) Southwest Texas 

Moody, C. LeGrande, Jr. (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Morgan, Robert C. (M) North Alabama 

Myers, Paul E. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Newton, C. D. S. (M) Delhi 

Page, Carlos C. (M) West Michigan 

Patton, Russell R. (M) Kentucky 

Pfaltzgraff, Richard C. (E) Iowa 

Ragsdale, Mrs. J. B. (M) Holston 

Ramer, Lloyd W. (M) Memphis 

Risinger, Melvin S. (M) West Virginia 

Rollins, Mrs. Rose (M) Northern New Jersey 

Shore, Philip L., Jr. (M) Western North Carolina 

Spain, Robert H. (M) Tennessee 

Spurr, Miss Edith (M) Southern New England 

Swales, Williain R. (M) Central New York 

Swofford, Mrs. Ross (M) Missouri East 

T albert, Melvin G. (M) Southern California-Arizona 

Taylor, Wendell P. C. (M) Mississippi (FCJ) 

Totten, Harold (E) Kansas West 

Vaughan, William C. (M) Virginia 

Verdin, Douglas F. (M) New York 

White, James K. (M) Central Illinois 

White, Raymon E. (M) Holston 

White, William D. (M) Northern Illinois 

Wilson, Carroll (M) Central Texas 

Wood, Allison C. (M) Northern New York 

Wood, Dr. Donald R. (M) Rocky Mountain 

Yaggy, Mrs. William H. (M) Iowa 

Zimmerynan, Eugene M. (M) Florida 



No. 14 

RITUAL AND ORDERS 
OF WORSHIP 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc. 
relating to ritual and orders of worship and all interests and activities 
of the Commission on Worship. 

Chairman — Mrs. Barbara Thompson Baltimore 

V ice-Chairman — Eugene T. Drinkard North Georgia 

Secretary — J. Jeffrey Hoover Iowa 

Place of Meeting: Room 105, St. Mark United Methodist Church 
(Italics denote ministerial delegates. (M) or (E) denotes former 
church membership) 



178 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Allen, Mrs. James (M) Virginia 

Anderegg, Miss Joyce (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Aponte, Ramon (M) New York 

Bearden, Robert E. L. (M) Little Rock 

Beebe, William L. (M) Wyoming 

Benedyktowicz, Witold (M) Poland 

Bright, William E. (M) Detroit 

Carrell, Olivia (M) California-Nevada 

Carver, Donald L. (M) Iowa 

Coleman, Harry (M) West Virginia 

Colpitts, Mrs. A. Hunter (E) North Indiana 

Dotts, Ted J. (M) Northwest Texas 

Drinkard, Eugene T. (M) North Georgia 

Dunn, Mrs. Sam A. (M) North Carolina 

Foster, George A. (M) Florida 

Gathings, Ervin M. (M) North Texas 

Haining, Kathleen L. (M) Minnesota 

Hardin, Granville N. (M) West Ohio 

Harding, Joe A. (M) Pacific Northwest 

Harper, John R. (M) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hartman, Tom (M) Kansas West 

Hoopert, Grantas E. (M) Central Pennsylvania 

Hoover, J. Jeffrey (M) Iowa 

Kesler, N. Robert (M) Southern California- Arizona 

Lash, H. Donald (E) Western Pennsylvania 

Lewis, William B. (M) Southern Illinois 

Myers, Calvin R. (M) East Ohio 

North, Jack B. (M) Central Illinois 

Oehler, Mrs. Jack (E) Northern Illinois 

Pope, H. David, Jr. (M) Texas 

Purdy, Burt (M) North Alabama 

Reeves, Richard E. (M) Central Illinois 

Rice, George E. (M) South Indiana 

Richer, Ben (E) West Ohio 

Schulz, Willard W. (E) Wisconsin 

Settle, Frank A. (M) Holston 

Smith, Irving L. ( M ) Oklahoma 

Smith, Robert M. (M) Western North Carolina 

Taylor, Eben (M) South Carolina (1785) 

Thompson, Mrs. Barbara (M) Baltimore 

Turner, James W. (M) Virginia 

Wonders, Dr. Alice (M) Central Texas 



"The plan of organization and rules of order of the 
General Conference shall be the plan of organization 
and rules of order as published in the journal of the 
preceding General Conference until they have been 
altered or modified by the action of the General Con- 
ference." (Discipline, ^ 607.) 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION 

I. OPENING SESSION AND ORGANIZATION 

The General Conference shall assemble on the day fixed 
and at the place designated in accordance with the action 
taken by the preceding General Conference or the Com- 
mission on the General Conference. The Holy Communion 
shall be celebrated by the Conference, the Council of Bish- 
ops being in charge. The opening business session of the 
Conference shall be on the day and at the hour fixed by the 
Commission on the General Conference and shall be called 
to order by the bishop designated, as provided in ^ 15 § 11 
of the Discipline. 

The following order of business shall be observed : 
A. Roll Call. The roll shall be called by the Secretary of 
the preceding General Conference in the following manner : 

(1) There shall be called the names of the bishops who 
have died since the adjournment of the preceding General 
Conference, and likewise the names of delegates-elect who 
have died. 

(2) The record of attendance shall be made in writing to 
the Secretary of the General Conference by : 

(a) The Secretary of the Council of Bishops for the 
bishops, 

(b) The Secretary of the Judicial Council for that body, 

(c) The Secretary of the Council of Secretaries for that 
body, and 

(d) The chairman of each delegation for its membership. 
The chairman shall be provided with a blank form on which 
to report in writing the attendance of its members, noting 
absentees and substitutions, which reports shall be tabulated 
by the Secretary and published in the Daihj Christian Ad- 
vocate. Any reserve seated in the place of a regular delegate 
shall have been duly elected as a reserve delegate by his 
Annual Conference, and shall meet the requirements set 
forth in the Discipline, ^^ 38-40. Delegates, including re- 
serves, when the latter are substituted for a delegate or 
delegates, shall be seated in the order of their election, 

179 



180 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

except when a reserve is seated temporarily, in which case 
he shall occupy the seat of the delegate for whom he is 
substituted. All delegates arriving after the opening roll 
call shall be reported by the chairman of the delegation to 
the Committee on Credentials, in order to be properly en- 
rolled. 

(3) A majority of the whole number of delegates to the 
General Conference shall constitute a quorum for the trans- 
action of business. (Discipline, ^ 608.) 

B. Election of Secretary-Designate. The Council of Bish- 
ops shall present a nomination from the ministry or lay 
membership of The United Methodist Church for secretary- 
designate. Other nominations shall be permitted from the 
floor. The time of election shall be scheduled during the 
session by the Agenda Committee. The election, if there be 
two or more nominees, shall be by ballot. The secretary- 
designate shall assume the responsibilities of the office of 
secretary as soon after the adjournment of the General 
Conference as all work in connection with the session in- 
cluding the preparation, printing and mailing of the 
Journal has been completed. The exact date of the transfer 
of responsibility to the secretary-designate shall be deter- 
mined by the Commission on the General Conference but 
shall not be later than 12 months after the adjournment of 
the General Conference. 

C. Committee Nominations and Elections. The Council 
of Bishops shall present nominations or appoint members 
for the standing administrative committees, and such other 
nominations as are hereinafter committed to it, for election 
by the General Conference. 

D. Miscellaneous Business. 

E. Adjournment. 

II. EPISCOPAL ADDRESS 

The Quadrennial Address of the Council of Bishops shall 
be delivered early in the Conference, at such hour as de- 
termined by the Commission on the General Conference in 
consultation with the Council of Bishops. 

III. PRESIDING OFFICERS 

The presiding officers for the several sessions of the 
Conference, the opening session excepted (see div. I above), 
shall be chosen from among the effective bishops in the 
following manner: The Council of Bishops shall at the 
opening session nominate for election by the Conference a 



The United Methodist Church 181 

Committee on Presiding Officers composed of one minister 
and one layman from each Jurisdiction, and one minister 
and one layman from among the delegates representing 
the Annual Conferences outside the United States, and 
four members at large. The Committee on Presiding Officers 
shall establish a continuing pool of five names of bishops 
from which group the presiding officer shall be selected by 
the committee. Each bishop shall be given reasonable notice 
of his selection for this pool, but subsequently he shall be 
available for assignment as presiding officer at any session. 
The committee shall be free to continue a bishop for more 
than one session, if in its judgment the parliamentary situa- 
tion requires this continuity of chairmanship. 

IV. SECRETARIAL STAFF 

(1) The Secretary of the General Conference elected as 
hereinbefore provided shall be responsible for all functions 
of the office in preparation for the session of the General 
Conference following his election. He shall serve until all 
work in connection with the session for which he has pre- 
pared has been completed. He shall keep the record of 
proceedings of all sessions of the General Conference. He 
shall compile and edit a Handbook for The General Con- 
ference and edit the official Journal of the General Con- 
ference. 

(2) The Conference shall elect, upon nomination by the 
Secretary, a Coordinator of Calendar who shall assist the 
Committee on Calendar in presenting reports in such an 
order so as to expedite the business of the Conference, as 
well as in other responsibilities of the committee. (See VI- 
A (2).) 

(3) The Conference shall elect, upon the nomination of 
the Secretary, such assistant secretaries from the ministry 
or lay membership of The United Methodist Church as it 
may deem wise. 

(4) The work of the Secretary shall be supervised by 
the Commission on the General Conference. A budget for 
the work of the Secretary shall be presented by the Com- 
mission on the General Conference to the Council on Fi- 
nance and Administration. Such budget shall be paid out 
of the General Administration Fund. 

(5) If in the interim of the quadrennial sessions of the 
General Conference the office of Secretary shall for any 
reason be vacated, the Council of Bishops shall elect a suc- 
cessor to serve until the next session. 



182 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

V. ENTERTAINMENT AND PROGRAM 

There shall be a Commission on the General Conference 
composed of one minister and one layman from each Juris- 
diction and four members at large who shall be nominated 
by the Council of Bishops and elected by the General Con- 
ference for a term of eight years; provided that at the 
1968 General Conference one-half of the members shall be 
elected for a term of four years so that thereafter the 
General Conference shall elect one-half of the members 
each quadrennium for a term of eight years. The Secretary 
of the General Conference, the Treasurer of the Council on 
Finance and Administration and the Director of the Con- 
vention Bureau shall also be members ex-ofRcio but without 
vote. If vacancies occur, for any reason, the Council of 
Bishops shall elect successors to serve for the unexpired 
term until the next session of the General Conference. The 
Commission shall elect two additional members at large for 
each quadrennium. 

The Council of Bishops shall designate one of its mem- 
bers to convene and organize the Commission before the 
adjournment of the General Conference. 

This Commission shall determine the place and time 
(within such limits as may be set up by the General Con- 
ference) of the next General Conference and shall send an 
official notice to all elected delegates announcing specifically 
the opening day and hour of the General Conference. The 
Commission shall make all necessary arrangements in con- 
nection therewith, including arrangements for the publica- 
tion of a book of quadrennial reports of the general boards 
and other general agencies of the Church, the same to be 
published by the United Methodist Publishing House. 

The Commission shall plan the schedule for the opening 
day of the Conference. 

The Commission shall recommend to the General Con- 
ference the per diem allowance to be paid to the elected 
delegates. 

The Commission shall issue invitations to fraternal dele- 
gates after consultation with the Council of Bishops, and 
shall arrange for their local entertainment for the specific 
period of time required for their presentation to the Gen- 
eral Conference. 

The Commission is authorized, if it deems it advisable, 
to select the site of the General Conference two quadren- 
nia in advance. 



The United Methodist Church 183 

VI. COMMITTEES 

The General Conference shall have the standing commit- 
tees hereinafter indicated, with such functions, responsi- 
bilities, and limitations respectively as are hereinafter pre- 
scribed, and such special committees as it may order. 

A. Standing Administrative Committees 

(1) Committee on Agenda. There shall be a Committee 
on Agenda. 

(a) It shall be composed of twelve members, at least 
four of whom shall be laymen, to be constituted as follows : 
One from each Jurisdiction, one from overseas, four mem- 
bers at large, the chairman of the Committee on Calendar 
when elected, and the chairman or substitute for the Pro- 
gram Chairman of the Program Committee of the Com- 
mission on the General Conference. It shall be appointed 
by the Council of Bishops at its winter meeting next pre- 
ceding the meeting of the General Conference from the 
elected delegates to the General Conference. 

(b) The Committee shall be convened by the Secretary 
of the General Conference at least the day before the open- 
ing of the General Conference and shall consult with the 
Council of Bishops, the Commission on the General Con- 
ference and the Secretary of the General Conference con- 
cerning pending business. 

(c) Following the presentation and adoption of the re- 
port of the Commission on the General Conference at the 
opening session of the General Conference, the Committee 
on Agenda shall immediately become responsible for helping 
guide the order of business of the Conference. 

(d) To this committee shall be referred all requests for 
special orders of the day, except those requested in the 
report of the Commission on the General Conference on 
the first day of the Conference. 

(e) Proposals, questions, communications, resolutions, 
and other matters not included in the regular business of 
the General Conference shall be referred to the Committee 
on Agenda without motion or debate. This committee shall 
determine whether or not the matter presented shall be 
considered by the General Conference. Appeal from the 
decision of this committee may be presented to the Confer- 
ence upon the written signature of twenty members of the 
Conference, and the item shall be presented to the Con- 
ference if the appeal is supported by a one-third vote. 

(f) The Committee on Agenda shall report to each ses- 
sion of the General Conference its recommendations con- 
cerning business agenda and time allocations for the va- 



184 Journal of the 1972 General Confei^eyice 

rious reports and business items, except that at all times 
the Committee on Calendar shall determine the order in 
which legislative committee reports shall be presented. 

(2) Calendar. The Committee on Calendar shall be com- 
posed of four members, nominated by the Council of Bish- 
ops. None of them shall be chairman of a Standing or 
Legislative Committee or a member or staff person of any- 
General Board or Agency. The committee, upon advice of 
the Coordinator of Calendar (IV (2)), shall (a) present 
calendar reports in such an order so as to expedite the 
business of the Conference, (b) advise the Committee on 
Presiding Officers as far ahead as is feasible of the calen- 
dar to be considered, (c) inform the presiding bishop of 
the priority status of the calendar, and (d) keep an over- 
view of calendar progress. The Secretary of the General 
Conference shall convene the Committee on Calendar. 

(3) Correlation and Editorial Revision. There shall be 
a committee of four known as the Committee on Correla- 
tion and Editorial Revision. This committee shall be com- 
posed of four persons not members of the General Con- 
ference, appointed by the Council of Bishops. The Book 
Editor shall be an ex-officio member. They shall be entitled 
to travel expense and per diem allowance, the same as the 
delegates. Two alternates shall be appointed by the Council 
of Bishops. The function of this committee shall be: 

(a) To review all proposed legislation reported in the 
Daily Christian Advocate and that presented in special re- 
ports to the General Conference and all legislation enacted 
by the General Conference. The Committee shall report 
promptly to the standing committees concerned, or to the 
General Conference as the situation may warrant, any and 
all contradictions, duplications, and inconsistencies dis- 
covered therein. 

(b) To report to the chairmen of the several standing 
legislative committees all changes it has made in the lan- 
guage of the reports adopted by the General Conference. 

(4) Courtesies and Privileges. There shall be a commit- 
tee of sixteen, composed of one minister and one layman 
from each Jurisdiction, one minister and one layman from 
among the delegates representing Annual Conferences out- 
side the United States, and four members at large known 
as the Committee on Courtesies and Privileges, having the 
following duties and responsibilities : 

(a) To consider, as presented to it by members of the 
Conference, what said members regard as questions or 
matters of privilege, to decide whether they are such or not, 
and if they are regarded as being such, to recommend to the 
Conference that they be heard. (Note: Only questions or 



The United Methodist Church 185 

matters of privilege which are so urgent that they cannot 
wait for consideration by this committee may be presented 
immediately to the Conference, as provided in Rule 9.) 

(b) To prepare, with due regard for brevity, and present 
to the Conference for its action such complimentary resolu- 
tions as occasion may demand. Other resolutions of com- 
mendations and appreciation offered by mem.bers of the 
General Conference shall be announced but not read and 
shall appear in their entirety in an appropriate place in the 
Daily Christian Advocate. 

(c) To arrange for extending courtesies of the Confer- 
ence to any to whom they may be due, fraternal delegates 
and official visitors excepted. 

(d) To arrange for a memorial service, at some time 
agreeable to the Conference, for deceased delegates-elect, 
and for bishops and general officers of the Church who 
have died since the adjournment of the last preceding Gen- 
eral Conference. 

(e) To limit its report, including the statement of the 
chairman and the hearing of such persons as may be pre- 
sented, to a maximum of twenty minutes in any one busi- 
ness session. No person or persons shall be presented after 
the sixth day unless approved by a two-thirds vote of the 
Conference. 

(f ) To prepare and publish in the Daily Christian Advo- 
cate, contemporaneously with the list of the nominees for 
election to the Judicial Council, biographical sketches not 
to exceed 100 words in length for each nominee. 

(5) Credentials. There shall be a Committee on Creden- 
tials of seven members. To this Committee, the chairmen 
of the respective annual conference delegations shall report 
on a form provided for that purpose any change in seating 
of delegates. This Committee shall, in turn, report to the 
Conference all changes in seating which have been reported 
to it and approved by it ; provided that the reserve delegates 
reported by the chairmen of the respective annual confer- 
ence delegations as substituted for absentees at the open- 
ing session shall be seated tentatively without such ap- 
proval. This committee shall make recommendation to the 
General Conference on any questions which may arise re- 
lated to the eligibility of seating any delegates. 

(6) Fraternal Delegates. There shall be a Committee on 
Fraternal Delegates of nine members, eight of whom shall 
be appointed by the Council of Bishops from the regularly 
elected delegates to the ensuing General Conference at the 
winter meeting of the Council of Bishops immediately pre- 
ceding the General Conference and the Chairman of the 
sub-Committee on Fraternal Delegates of the Commission 



186 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

on the General Conference. The Council of Bishops shall 
designate a temporary chairman of the committee, who 
shall call the committee to meet at the seat of the General 
Conference at least one full day prior to the opening of the 
Conference. To this committee shall be referred all com- 
munications, credentials, and information in the hands of 
the Secretary or the Council of Bishops relating to frater- 
nal delegates and official visitors. 

The function of the committee shall be to extend the 
courtesies of the Conference to the fraternal delegates and 
official visitors and present them to the General Conference. 
The terms "fraternal delegates" and "official visitors" shall 
be interpreted to include only persons who have been duly 
elected by the Christian communions of which they are 
respectively members, to represent the same before the 
General Conference, who present the appropriate creden- 
tials of such elections, and who have been invited through 
the Commission on the General Conference, after consulta- 
tion with the Council of Bishops. 

In so far as possible the committee shall plan the presen- 
tation of such fraternal delegates and official visitors dur- 
ing the first week of the General Conference. 

(7) Journal. There shall be a committee of seven which 
shall daily examine the record of the Secretary, comparing 
it with the stenographic record, and report its findings to 
the Conference, recommending appropriate action. Any er- 
ror subsequently discovered in a section of the Journal 
which has been approved shall be reported to the Conference 
for correction. 

(8) Plan of Organization and Rules of Order. There shall 
be a Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order of eleven members. The Secretary of the Conference 
shall be an ex-officio member and one of the eleven. To this 
committee shall be referred any proposed amendments to 
the Plan of Organization and Rules of Order. (See Rule 
40.) To it may be referred any other matters relating to 
parliamentary order or procedure in the business of the 
General Conference. 

This committee shall serve as an Interim Committee be- 
tween sessions of the General Conference and shall restudy 
the Plan of Organization and Rules of Order and, after 
making such needed changes and adaptations therein as in 
its judgment are necessary, shall present them to the Gen- 
eral Conference for consideration and final action, same to 
be published in the Journal of the General Conference. 

The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order of the 
General Conference shall be the* Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order as published in the Journal of the preceding 



The United Methodist Church 187 

General Conference until they have been altered or modified 
by the action of The General Conference. (See Discipline, 
^607.) 

(9) Presiding Officers. See div. Ill above. 

(10) Reference. There shall be a Committee on Refer- 
ence composed of one ministerial and one lay representative 
from each Jurisdiction, at least two of whom shall be law- 
yers, one minister and one layman from Annual Confer- 
ences outside the United States, and four members at large, 
to be appointed by the Council of Bishops from the regular- 
ly elected delegates to the ensuing General Conference at 
the winter meeting of the said Council of Bishops preceding 
the session of the General Conference. This committee shall 
be convened by the Secretary of the General Conference 
prior to and at the seat of the General Conference. After 
ascertaining that the petitions, resolutions, and similar 
communications dealing with the regular business of the 
Conference meet the requirements herein specified, this 
committee shall refer the same to the appropriate standing 
administrative or legislative committees. This committee 
shall be responsible for such assignment of all petitions 
which may be in the hands of the Secretary prior to the 
opening session, including the Episcopal Address, the book 
of printed Quadrennial Reports and all other communica- 
tions which shall come into his hands after the convening 
of the General Conference. (Par. 609 of the Disciplirie 
provides that petitions shall be in the hands of the Sec- 
retary not later than thirty days before the opening of the 
Conference session; provided, however, the Secretary shall 
accept up to the opening day petitions from overseas and 
from Conferences meeting within thirty days before the 
General Conference.) 

The Committee on Reference may withdraw a paper 
after having assigned it to a committee, either upon a 
request or upon its own motion. It may also withhold from 
reference or publication any document it shall deem im- 
proper, promptly advising the author, or authors, thereof 
of its action in order that an appeal may be made to the 
Conference if desired. The committee shall publish as 
promptly as possible in the Daily Christian Advocate lists 
of the communications it has referred to the several stand- 
ing committees, identifying each by number, title, origin, 
and destination. No petition shall be assigned by the Com- 
mittee on Reference to any General Conference committee 
unless it comes from some organization, minister, or mem- 
ber of The United Methodist Church, and also contains in- 
formation essential to the verification of the alleged facts 
concerning its origin. 



188 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

All petitions should be presented in triplicate. Each 
should deal with only one general subject, and so far as 
possible, only one chapter in the Discipline. Not more than 
one petition should be presented on a single sheet of paper, 

(11) Tellers. There shall be a committee of sixty, to 
act as tellers for the purpose of reporting on count votes 
and ballots ordered by the General Conference. The tellers 
shall be divided into two groups of thirty each. Each group 
shall have reserve tellers. The Secretary of the General 
Conference shall appoint tellers and reserve tellers whose 
names shall be printed in the Daily Christian Advocate. 

B. Standing Legislative Committees ^ 

The General Conference shall have the following stand- 
ing legislative committees, which shall consider all proposals 
looking toward new legislation or changes in the present 
legislation of the church and report recommendations re- 
lating thereto to the Conference; provided, however, that 
reports and proposals from the regular councils and special 
commissions of the General Conference may be made direct- 
ly to the Conference. The term "legislative" as descriptive 
of the functions of these committees is not to be inter- 
preted with absolute strictness, in as much as they may 
consider matters calculated to eventuate in the form of ad- 
vices, resolutions, appeals, etc., as well as in legislation. Too 
extensive use of Special Study Committees authorized by 
the General Conference tends to limit the work and impor- 
tance of our legislative committees. Under ordinary circum- 
stances Special Study Committees should report briefly to 
the General Conference, after which their reports should 
be referred automatically to the appropriate legislative 
committees for study at the beginning of the General Con- 
ference sessions. After the Study Committee makes its 
report, the General Conference by a two-thirds vote may 
authorize immediately consideration of this report. 

(1) Christian Social Concerns. To this committee shall 
be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to social 
issues and all interests and activities of the Boards of 
Christian Social Concerns. 

(2) Conferences. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the interests and 
activities of the General, Jurisdictional, Annual, Provi- 
sional Annual, District, and Missionary Conferences, and to 



1 The 1972 General Conference granted the Interim Committee on Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order the power to reconstitute the number and re- 
sponsibilities of the Standing Legislative Committees for the 1976 General Conference 
in keeping with the restructuring adopted by the 1972 General Conference; see Jour- 
nal, page 534. 



The United Methodist Church 189 

the structure of the Program Councils. All petitions, reso- 
lutions, etc., relating to Central Conferences shall be re- 
ferred to the Commission on Central Conference Affairs. 

(3) Education. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the interests and 
activities of the Boards of Education and Commission on 
Archives and History. 

(4) Lay Activities and Church Finance. To this commit- 
tee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., re- 
lating to the interests of lay activities and the Boards 
of the Laity; and relating to trustees, properties, church 
finance (general and local). 

(5) Membership and Evangelism. To this committee shall 
be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to church 
membership, including conditions, duties, and transfer 
thereof; and relating to the interests and activities of the 
Boards of Evangelism. 

(6) Clergy. To this committee shall be referred all peti- 
tions, resolutions, etc., relating to the Clergy of the Church 
in all its forms, grades, and orders, and relating to all 
interests and activities of the Boards of the Ministry. 

(7) Missions. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the interests and 
activities of the Boards of Missions. 

(8) Pensions. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the support of re- 
tired and supernumerary ministers, and of widow^s and 
dependent children of deceased ministers, not including 
bishops, and all matters relating to pensions of lay employ- 
ees of Church organizations, boards, agencies, or institu- 
tions and all interests and activities of the Boards of Pen- 
sions. 

(9) Communications and Publications. To this committee 
shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating 
to all the Publications of The United Methodist Church 
and to all interests and activities of the Board of Publica- 
tions, the Commission on Public Relations and United Meth- 
odist Information, and the Divisions of Interpretation and 
Television, Radio and Film Communication of the Program 
Council. 

(10) Health and Welfare. To this committee shall be 
referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the in- 
terests and activities of the Board of Health and Welfare 
Ministries, and to all the eleemosynary work. 

(11) Ecumenical Affairs. To this committee shall be re- 
ferred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the in- 
terests and activities of the Commission of Ecumenical 



190 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Affairs and all Interdenominational activities, relations, in- 
terests and responsibilities of The United Methodist Church, 
including the American Bible Society, the National Council 
of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America, 
the World Council of Churches and Committee on Religion 
in American Life. 

(12) Judicial Administration, Enabhng Acts and Legal 
Forms. To this committee shall be referred all petitions, 
resolutions, etc., relating to the formal disciplining, trial, 
and appeal of members and ministers of The United Meth- 
odist Church, and relating to the Judicial Council and the 
judicial procedure within the Church. This committee shall 
also be charged with the responsibility of preparing and 
presenting for adoption by the Conference, such enabling 
acts and legal forms as may be needed in the continuing 
process of unifying the interests and agencies of the 
Church. 

(13) Local Church. To this committee shall be referred 
all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the organization 
and duties of the various bodies within the local church. 
Proposed legislation emanating from other General Con- 
ference committees concerning local church organization 
shall be referred to this committee on Local Church for 
consideration, action and reporting to General Conference. 

(14) Ritual and Orders of Worship. To this committee 
shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to 
ritual and orders of worship and all interests and activities 
of the Commission on Worship. 

C. Membership of Committees 

Each delegate shall serve as a member of one of the 
standing legislative committees numbered 1 to 14. Within 
the Annual Conference delegation each member shall choose 
from the legislative committees 1 to 14 the committee on 
which he shall serve, the choice being made in order of 
election. The layman first elected shall be entitled to the 
first choice, the minister first elected to the second choice, 
and thus the right of choice shall continue to alternate 
between lay and ministerial delegates in the order of their 
election; provided, that two members of a delegation may 
not serve on any one of the above-designated standing 
legislative committees 1 to 14 unless the said delegation 
is represented on each of them. All delegations composed of 
fourteen or more members shall assign all members in excess 
of fourteen according to this same principle of distribu- 
tion. (For example, a Conference with sixteen delegates 
shall have two members on each of any two of these four- 



The United Methodist Church 191 

teen committees, and one on each of the remaining twelve. 
Each delegate may, in the order of his turn to choose, 
select any one of these fourteen committees, provided that 
the foregoing division of delegates among the committees 
is maintained.) 

If a matter is under consideration in any standing legis- 
lative committee which in the judgment of any Annual 
Conference delegation vitally affects the interests of its 
constituency, and if the said Annual Conference is not 
represented in the membership of said committee, then 
the said delegation may choose one of its number to repre- 
sent its Annual Conference in the committee when the 
matter judged to be vital to the interests of this con- 
stituency is under consideration. Such a person shall be 
entitled to sit with the committee while this particular 
matter is being considered. He shall be entitled to the floor, 
subject to such limitations as are imposed on the regular 
members of said committee, but he shall not be entitled to 
vote. 

D. Meeting of Committees 

(1) For Organization. All standing legislative and ad- 
ministrative committees shall meet for organization at such 
time as the Commission on the General Conference shall de- 
termine. A Bishop appointed by the Council of Bishops and 
an assistant secretary appointed by the Secretary of the 
General Conference shall serve, respectively, as chairman 
and secretary to effect an organization in each of the several 
standing committees. 

(a) The election of chairman, vice-chairman, and secre- 
tary of each standing committee, both administrative and 
legislative, shall be by ballot. 

(b) The assistant secretary appointed for the organiza- 
tion of each standing legislative committee shall report in 
writing to the Secretary of the Conference at the earliest 
possible date the oflficers elected. In the case of all other 
committees the secretary elected shall make such report 
immediately to the Secretary of the Conference. 

(c) The Secretary of the General Conference shall be 
responsible for arranging for a coaching meeting for all 
chairmen, vice-chairmen, and secretaries of legislative com- 
mittees, as soon as possible after their elections. This coach- 
ing shall include instruction in their duties, all procedures 
in the handling of petitions, the times of the daily deadline 
for publishing reports, and other information to expedite 
the work of the committees. The Commission on the General 



192 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Conference is requested to arrange for a time and place for 
such a meeting. 

(2) Regular Meetings. The standing legislative commit- 
tees 1 to 14 inclusive shall meet for business as scheduled by 
the Agenda Committee unless otherwise ordered by the 
Conference, until their work is completed, and at such other 
times as the committees may themselves determine. 

(3) Quorum for Committee Meetings. A majority of the 
members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of 
business in all committees. 

E. Function and Authority of Committees 

(1) The standing administrative committees, without 
specific instruction or direction from the Conference, shall 
assume responsibility for considering and reporting to the 
Conference upon all matters which would logically fall with- 
in their respective purviews, if it seems wise to do so, as 
these are indicated hereinbefore. 

(2) The standing legislative committees may not origi- 
nate business, but shall consider and report only upon that 
which is referred to them directly by the Conference or 
through the Committee on Reference, the Agenda Commit- 
tee, or the Committee on Calendar. (See Rule 31.) 



VII. PROPOSAL INVOLVING EXPENDITURE OF 
UNBUDGETED FUNDS 

When any proposal is submitted to the General Confer- 
ence to establish an interim or continuing board, commis- 
sion, or committee, before final action is taken by the 
General Conference establishing such board, commission, 
or committee, said proposal shall be referred to the Council 
on Finance and Administration or its executive committee, 
with the request that it bring to the General Conference 
an estimated budget of the expense of operation of the 
proposed board, commission, or committee for the next 
quadrennium and a statement of how the adoption of such 
proposal will affect the budget or budgets for the existing 
boards, commissions, or committees as already presented 
by the Council on Finance and Administration. 

When any proposal is submitted to the General Confer- 
ence which involves the expenditure of funds not included 
in an established budget, such proposal shall be referred 
for advice and recommendation to the Council on Finance 
and Administration before final action is taken by the 
General Conference. 



The United Methodist Church 193 

VIII. DELEGATES' EXPENSE ACCOUNTS 

(1) The report of the chairmen of the respective annual 
conference delegations shall be the basis for settlement 
with principal and reserve delegates for their per diem 
allowances. 

(2) The total traveling expense shall be payable to the 
principal delegate if he be present and seated. If during 
the session of the Conference a reserve delegate is seated in 
his place, he shall adjust the travel expense with such re- 
serve on the basis of the time served by each. 

(3) Travel expense for delegates to the Conference shall 
be on the basis of railroad fare by the most direct route 
(clergy fare for ministers), lower berth or roomette (Pull- 
man) and meals en route, or by air coach. Overseas dele- 
gates shall be allowed travel expenses on the basis of round- 
trip tourist air fare, directly to and from the seat of the 
Conference. Additional expenses may be allowed such dele- 
gates for arrival and departure not to exceed two days in 
either case. Unavoidable exceptions to this limitation of two 
days before and two days after General Conference, due to 
transportation schedules, must be approved by the Council 
on Finance and Administration. The per diem expense al- 
lowance for all such days before and after General Con- 
ference shall be at the same rate as granted delegates dur- 
ing General Conference. When two or more delegates come 
in one automobile, the owner shall be allowed 8 cents per 
mile for his car plus the cost of room and meals en route. 
Guest passengers who are members of the General Con- 
ference shall submit only the cost of room and meals en 
route. In all cases delegates shall report only the actual 
cost of travel. 

IX. MATERIAL TO BE INCLUDED IN THE 
DISCIPLINE 

(1) No non-legislative material shall be ordered printed 
in the Discipline without first referring it to the Committee 
on Correlation and Editorial Revision for consideration and 
report to the General Conference for further consideration 
and final action. 

(2) The Book Editor, the Secretary of the General Con- 
ference and the Publisher of the United Methodist Church 
shall be charged with editing the Discipline and Book of 
Resolutions. The Editors, in the exercise of their judgment, 
shall have the authority to make changes in phraseology as 
may be necessary to harmonize legislation without changing 
its substance. 



RULES OF ORDER 

I. DAILY SCHEDULE 

Rule 1. Hours of Meetings 

The following shall be the daily order for the General 
Conference, Sundays excepted : 

(1) 8:30 A.M. to 9:10 A.M. — Devotional service under 
direction of the Council of Bishops. 

(2) 9:10 A.M. to 12:30 p.m. — Conference business with 
recess for ten minutes at 10 :30. 

(3) 2:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. — Committee meetings. 

(4) 7:30 P.M. — Evening programs as planned by the 
Commission on the General Conference or committee 
meetings. 

Rule 2. Order of Business 

After devotional service the daily sessions of the Con- 
ference shall be conducted as follows : 

(1) Report of Committee on Journal of the previous 
meeting or meetings. 

(2) Report of Committee on Courtesies and Privileges. 

(3) Reports of other standing administrative and special 
committees. 

(4) Calendar. 

(5) Miscellaneous business. 

H. PRESIDING OFFICERS 

Rule 3. Authority of the Chairman 

The bishop presiding shall be the legal chairman of the 
General Conference. He shall decide points of order raised 
by the members, and shall rule on points of order not raised 
by the members, as he deems necessary to conform to these 
rules of order; subject, in both cases, to an appeal to the 
Conference by any member without debate ; except that the 
chairman and the appellant, in the order here named, shall 
each have five minutes for a statement in support of their 
respective positions. A tie vote in the case of appeal shall 
sustain the chair. When any member raises a point of order 
he shall cite, by number, the rule he adjudges to have been 
violated. The presiding bishop shall have the right to re- 
cess a session of the General Conference at any time at 
his discretion and to reconvene at such time as he shall 
announce, with only delegates, authorized personnel and 

194 



The United Methodist Church 195 

authorized guests permitted to attend such a session follow- 
ing recess. 

Rule 4. Calling the Conference to Order 

When the chairman stands in his place and calls the 
Conference to order, no member shall speak, address the 
chair, or stand, while the chairman stands. 

III. RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF MEMBERS 

Rule. 5. Attendance and Seating Reserves 

No member, unless hindered by sickness or otherwise 
from being present, shall absent himself from the sessions 
of the Conference without permission of the Conference; 
and all absentees shall be reported by the chairmen of the 
several Annual Conference delegations to the Committee 
on Credentials on a form provided for this purpose. No 
reserve delegate shall have the privilege of membership 
until the substitution has been approved by the Conference, 
except at the first session of the Conference, as provided 
in the Plan of Organization, div. I, sec. A, subs. 2d. 

Rule 6. Directions for Securing the Floor 

When a delegate desires to speak to the Conference, he 
shall arise at his designated seat, respectfully address the 
presiding officer, using the term, ''Mr. Chairman," and, 
after recognition, proceed to the speaker's platform, where, 
before speaking, he shall give the chairman, in writing, 
his name and that of the Annual Conference which he 
represents; which, in turn, the chairman shall then an- 
nounce to the Conference. 

If by reason of the intended brevity of his remarks he 
speaks from one of the microphones in the aisles of the 
assembly hall, he shall first announce his name and the name 
of the Annual Conference which he represents ; which, in 
turn, the chairman shall then announce to the Conference. 

Rule 7. Interrupting the Speaker 

No member who has the floor may be interrupted except 
for a breach of order, or a misrepresentation, or to direct 
the attention of the Conference to the fact that the time 
has arrived for a special order, or to raise a very urgent 
question of high privilege. 

Rule 8. Speaking More Than Once; Length of Speech 

No member shall speak a second time on the same ques- 
tion if any mem.ber who has not spoken desires the floor, 



196 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

no more than twice on the same subject under the same 
motion, no longer than ten minutes unless his time shall be 
extended by the Conference, except as provided in Rule 37. 
This ten-minute limit may be reduced by a majority vote 
of the Conference at any time, and for any period of 
duration. 

Rule 9. Question of High Privilege 

A member claiming the floor at any time for what he 
believes is a very urgent question of high privilege shall 
be allowed to indicate briefly the nature of the question, 
and if it be adjudged by the chair to be such, he may 
proceed at his pleasure or until the chairman judges that 
he has exhausted his privilege. (See Plan of Organization, 
div. VI, sec. A, subs. 4a.) 

Rule 10. Voting Area of Conference 

Only delegates within the area of the Conference when 
the vote is taken shall be entitled to vote. All delegates with- 
in the area at the time a question is put shall vote, except 
such as shall have been excused for special reasons by the 
Conference. 

Rule 11. Voting Procedure 

Voting shall be by a show of hands unless otherwise 
ordered by the Conference. An "aye" and "nay" vote, if 
taken, shall be by signed ballot. An "aye" or "nay" vote by 
secret ballot may be ordered on call of any member, sup- 
ported by one-third of the members present and voting. 
A count vote may be ordered on call of any member sup- 
ported by one-third of the members present and voting, 
in which case the delegates shall rise from their seats and 
stand until counted. 

No other business shall be in order when a vote is being 
taken or when the previous question has been called, until 
the process is completed, except such as relates to the vote 
itself, or that which can be appropriately fitted into the 
time while waiting for the report of the secretaries on a 
count vote, or an "aye" or "nay" vote. The count shall be 
made by the Committee of Tellers as appointed and assigned 
by the Secretary of General Conference. 

Rule 12. Division of Question 

Before a vote is taken any delegate shall have the right 
to call for a division of any question, if it is subject to 
such division as he indicates. If no delegate objects, the 
division shall be made; but if there is objection, the chair 



The United Methodist Church 197 

shall put the question of division to vote, not waiting for 
a second. 

Rule 13. Vote by Orders 

The ministerial and lay delegates shall deliberate as one 
body; but upon a call, by motion of any delegate, seconded 
by another delegate of the same order and supported by 
one-third of the members of that order voting, the minis- 
terial and lay delegates shall vote separately. But when 
the Conference votes by orders, no measure shall be passed 
without the concurrence of a majority of both classes of 
delegates. In cases of such a vote the order calling for it 
shall vote first; provided, however, that the Conference 
may not vote by orders on a proposed amendment to the 
Constitution. {Discipline, ^ 64-66.) 

IV. BUSINESS PROCEDURE 

Rule 14. Motion for Adoption of Reports and 
Resolutions Unnecessary 

Whenever a report of a committee signed by the chair- 
man and secretary thereof, or a resolution signed by two 
or more members of the Conference, shall be presented 
to the Conference for its action, it shall be deemed in 
proper order for consideration by the Conference without 
the formality of a motion to adopt, and a second thereto. 

Rule 15. Required Forms for Reports, 
Resolutions, Motions, Amendments 

All resolutions and committee reports shall be presented 
in triplicate; and, when requested by the Secretary, mo- 
tions, including amendments, shall be presented in writing. 

Rule 16. Reading of Reports and Resolutions 

All resolutions, committee reports, and communications 
to the Conference shall be read by the Secretary except as 
otherwise provided in Rule 34. 

Rule 17. Alterations of Motions, etc. 

When a motion is made and seconded, or a resolution is 
introduced and seconded, or a committee report is read, or 
is published in the Daily Christian Advocate, it shall be 
deemed to be in possession of the Conference, and may not 
be altered except by action of the Conference. (See Rule 
33.) 



198 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Rule 18. Undebatable Motions 

The following motions shall be acted upon without de- 
bate: 

(1) To adjourn, when unqualified, except to adjourn the 
Conference finally. 

(2) To suspend the rules. 

(3) To laj^ on the table, except as provided in Rule 37. 

(4) To take from the table. 

(5) To call for the previous question. 

(6) To reconsider a non-debatable motion. 

(7) To limit or extend the limits of debate. 

(8) To call for the orders of the day. 

Rule 19. Rights of the Main Question 

The main question may be opened to debate under the 
following motions: to adopt, to commit or refer, to sub- 
stitute, to postpone, and to reconsider. No new motion, 
resolution, or subject shall be entertained until the one 
under consideration shall have been disposed of except as 
provided in Rule 11. The foregoing does not apply to sec- 
ondary motions if otherwise allowable in the existing par- 
liamentary situation. 

Rule 20. Precedence of Secondary Motions 

If any one or more of the following motions shall be 
made when one or more other motions are pending, the 
order of their precedence in relation to one another shall 
be the same as the order of their listing below : 

(1) To fix the time to which the Conference shall ad- 
journ. (This motion is subject to amendment, or 
it may be laid on the table.) 

(2) To adjourn. 

(3) To take recess. 

(4) To order the previous question. 

(5) To lay on the table. 

(6) To limit or extend the Hmits of debate. 

(7) To postpone to a given time. 

(8) To commit or refer. 

(9) To amend or to substitute (one amendment being 
allowed to an amendment) . 

(10) To postpone indefinitely. 

Rule 21. Tabling Related Motions 

No motion which adheres to another motion, or has 
another motion adhering to it, can be laid on the table by 
itself. Such motions, if laid on the table, carry with them 



The United Methodist Church 199 

the motions to which they respectively adhere, or which 
adhere to them. 

Rule 22. Referring Reports, etc. 

It shall be in order for the Conference to refer to a 
committee a section or part of a report or resolution which 
is before the Conference for consideration, or any amend- 
ment offered thereto. 

Rule 23. Procedure for Consideration of Substitutes 

When a resolution or committee report is properly be- 
fore the Conference for consideration and action, even if 
amendments thereto are pending, a substitute therefor may 
be offered by any member moving that the same be sub- 
stituted for the report or resolution under consideration. 
The Conference shall then proceed first to perfect the 
original report or resolution, including consideration and 
action upon any amendments which may be offered to it. 
The same perfecting process shall then be followed with 
respect to the substitute. The question shall then be put 
first on the motion to substitute, followed by the motion 
to adopt the report or resolution; provided, however, that 
the motion for the previous question shall not be in order 
on the adoption of the report or recommendation or on 
making the proposed substitution until opportunity has 
been given for at least two members to speak on each side 
of the question of substitution or adoption. 

Rule 24. Previous Question 

When any member moves the previous question (that is, 
that the vote be now taken on the motion or motions pend- 
ing), he shall indicate to what he intends it to apply, if any 
secondary motion or motions are also pending. If he does 
not so indicate, it shall be regarded as applying only to the 
immediately pending question. This motion shall be taken 
without debate, and shall require a two-third-^, vote of those 
present and voting for its adoption; and if it is adopted, 
the vote shall be taken on the motion or motions to which 
it applies without further debate except as provided in 
Rule 37. (See also Rules 18, 23, 25.) 

Rule 25. Unlawful Motion After Speech 

It shall not be in order for a member immediately after 
discussing a pending question, and before relinquishing 
the floor, to make a motion whose adoption would limit or 
stop debate. 



200 Jou7'nal of the 1972 Genej-al Conference 

Rule 26. Exceptions to Majority Vote 

A majority of those voting, a quorum being present, 
shall decide all questions with the following exceptions. 

(1) One-third of those present and voting shall suffice 
to sustain a call for a count vote in case the decision of 
the chair is doubted. (See Rule 11.) A tie vote sustains 
the chair (Rule 3). 

(2) A call for a vote by orders shall prevail if sustained 
by one-third of the members of the order from which the 
call came, present and voting. (See Rule 13.) 

(3) A two-thirds vote shall be required to sustain a mo- 
tion to suspend (Rule 39) or amend (Rule 40) the rules; 
to sustain a motion for the previous question (Rule 24) ; 
to set aside a special order; to consider a special order 
before the time set therefor; to sustain the request of the 
Committee on Courtesies and Privileges for the presenta- 
tion of any person after the sixth day of the General 
Conference. 

(4) A two-thirds vote shall be required to approve a 
proposal for a constitutional amendment. (Discipline, H^ 
64-66.) 

Rule 27. Reconsideration . 

A motion to reconsider an action of the Conference shall 
be in order at any time if offered by a member who voted 
with the prevailing side. If the motion it is proposed to 
reconsider is non-debatable, the motion to reconsider may 
not be debated. 

Rule 28. Calendars, Regular and Non-Concurrence . 

The Secretary shall keep a chronological record of orders 
of the day and of reports of committees (see Rule 32), 
which record shall be called the Calendar ; and the matters 
of business placed on it shall be considered as recommended 
by the Committee on Calendar, unless by a two-thirds vote 
of the Conference an item is taken up out of its order. 

When a committee presents a report on a given subject, 
as a part of its report, it must also list the numbers of 
all petitions relating to this subject on which the com- 
mittee voted non-concurrence. 

Rule 29. Motion to Adjourn in Order Except — 

The motion to adjourn, when unqualified, shall be taken 
without debate, and shall always be in order, except: 

( 1 ) When a delegate has the floor. 

(2) When a question is actually put, or a vote is being 
taken, and before it is finally decided. 



The United Methodist Church 201 

(3) When the previous question has been ordered and 
action thereunder is pending. 

(4) When a motion to adjourn has been lost, and no 
business or debate has intervened. 

(5) When the motion to fix the time to v^hich the Con- 
ference shall adjourn is pending. 

The foregoing does not apply to a motion for final ad- 
journment of the Conference. 



V. COMMITTEES 

Rule 30. Rules of Order of Legislative Committees 

The rules of order of the General Conference shall be 
observed in meetings of standing legislative committees 
in so far as they apply. 

Rule 31. Duties and Prerogatives of Committees 

As its first v^ork, a committee shall evaluate its petitions, 
come to agreements regarding priority, and outline its work 
on the basis of those priorities. 

When a petition or resolution or any similar item is 
referred to one of the several standing legislative com- 
mittees, it shall be understood that the whole question 
with which the paper has to do is referred to that commit- 
tee for such action as it may deem wise. Committees shall 
report to the Conference upon all matters referred to them 
by the Conference, directly or through the Committee on 
Reference. Committee reports on resolutions, petitions, etc., 
shall cite the same, identifying them by numbers they 
bear respectively in the published reports of the Committee 
on Reference, or in some other suitable manner. 

When a committee ascertains that another committee is 
or, in its judgment, should be considering a subject which 
the former is considering, it shall report the matter to 
the Committee on Reference for such adjustment as the 
situation may require. 

Rule 32. Legislative Committees Report to Secretary 

As quickly as material can be prepared, each secretary of 
a standing legislative committee shall present a clearly 
marked original work copy of the committee's report, signed 
by the committee chairman and secretary, to the Secretary 
of the Conference. The original work copy shall be marked 
with the priority the committee places on that subject. The 
Secretary of the Conference shall receive said reports, type 
them in triplicate, enter them into the calendar and furnish 



202 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

the editor of the Daily Christian Advocate with one of 
the copies for pubhcation. 

Committee and minority reports which propose changes 
in the Discipli^ie shall give chapter, section and paragraph 
to be affected and shall be prepared in the following 
manner: existing words used as reference points shall be 
in quotes ; words to be deleted shall be single-underscored ; 
words to be added shall be double-underscored. In publica- 
tion of these reports The Daily Christian Advocate shall 
substitute italics for single underscoring and boldface for 
double underscoring. 

Rule 33. Published Reports in Possession of 
Conference 

Reports submitted by the committee according to the 
deadline as announced by the Secretary of the Conference 
shall appear in the next day's Daily Christian Advocate. 
The report as printed in the Daily Christian Advocate 
becomes the official copy, subject only to grammatical or 
other obvious editorial changes, and shall be regarded as in 
the possession of the Conference. On the day following its 
first appearance in the Daily Christian Advocate, or any 
time thereafter, a report is in order for consideration at the 
pleasure of the Conference. The same rule shall apply to a 
report of a minority of any committee signed by one-tenth 
of the members of the committee, or by ten members there- 
of. (See Rule 17.) 

Rule 34. Preparation and Printing of Reports 

All committee reports shall be presented to the Secretary 
of the Conference in triplicate on paper provided therefor, 
and shall bear at the top the name of the committee, its 
total membership, the number present at the time the report 
was adopted, the number voting for and the number voting 
against the report respectively, and the number not voting. 
In addition to concurrence or non-concurrence, a committee 
may recommend referral to the next General Conference. 
Reports of the standing legislative committees shall be 
printed in the Daily Christiayi Advocate at least one day 
before being presented for consideration by the Confer- 
ence, and they shall not be read unless by its order. 

Reports of minorities of committees adopted by them 
with a view to their being offered as substitutes for com- 
mittee reports (see Rule 33) shall likewise conform to 
this rule so far as it is applicable, indicating clearly to 
what committee the respective minorities belong and for 
what reports by serial number, etc., they propose the respec- 
tive substitutes. 



The United Methodist Church 203 

Rule 35. Committee Chairman Not in Harmony 
with Report 

When the chairman of a committee is not in harmony 
with a report adopted by the committee, it shall be his 
duty to state the fact to the committee, which shall elect 
one of its members to represent it in the presentation and 
discussion of the report in the Conference; but if, in such 
a case, the committee shall fail to select a representative, 
the chairman shall designate a member to represent the 
committee, and said representatives shall have all the rights 
and privileges of the chairman in relation to such report. 

Rule 36. Presentation of Report of Minority 

A member selected by the signers of a report of a minori- 
ty of a committee (see Rule 33) to present the same shall 
have the same rights and privileges in relation thereto 
which belong to the chairman in the presentation of the 
regular (majority) report of the committee, except that he 
may not present said minority report until the majority 
report has been presented, and shall then offer it as a 
substitute therefor, and except, further, that in closing the 
debate on the question of making the substitution the 
member presenting the minority report shall speak firot 
and the chairman last. (See Rule 23.) 

Rule 37. Speakers For and Against 

When the report of a committee is under consideration, 
it shall be the duty of the presiding officer to ascertain, 
when he recognizes a member of the Conference, on which 
side he proposes to speak; and he shall not assign the 
floor to any member proposing to speak on the same side 
of the pending question as the speaker immediately preced- 
ing if any member desires to speak on the other side 
thereof. 

Except for undebatable motions, no report shall be 
adopted or question relating to the same decided without 
opportunity having been given for at least two speeches 
for and two against the said proposal, provided that right 
is claimed before the chairman or duly authorized membsr 
representing the committee's report or the minority report, 
if there be such, is presented to close the debate. 

When all have spoken Vv'ho desire to do so, or when (and 
after) the previous question has been ordered, the chairman 
or/and duly authorized member or members presenting the 
committee's report (and the minority report if there be 
one) shall be entitled to speak before the vote is taken. 

This right of the chairman and/or other member or 
members to close the debate shall prevail in like manner 



204 Journal of the 1972 General Confereyice 

to a limit of five minutes when a vote is about to be taken 
on a motion to amend, to substitute, to postpone, to refer, 
or to lay on the table or any other motion v^^hose adoption 
would vitally affect the report under consideration; pro- 
vided, that this five-minute limit shall not apply to a motion 
to substitute a minority report (see Rule 33) for a regular 
(majority) report of a committee. 

Rule 38. Effective Date 

All actions of the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church shall become effective upon the final ad- 
journment of the session of the General Conference at 
which they are enacted, unless otherwise specified, except 
as provided in ^ 631.21 of the Discipline. 

VI. SUSPENDING, AMENDING, AND 
SUPPLEMENTING 

Rule 39. Suspension of Rules 

The operation of any of the provisions of the Plan of 
Organization or of these Rules of Order may be suspended 
at any time by a two-thirds vote of the Conference. (See 
Rule 26, subs. 3.) 

Rule 40. Amending Rules 

The Plan of Organization and these Rules of Order may 
be amended or changed by a two-thirds vote of the Con- 
ference; provided the proposed change or amendment has 
originated in the Committee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order, or has been presented to the Conference 
in writing and referred to this committee, which commit- 
tee shall report thereon not later than the following day. 
(See Rule 26, subs. 3.) 

Rule 41. Robertas Rules of Order, 
Supplemental Authority 

In any parliamentary situation not clearly covered by the 
Plan of Organization or these Rules of Order, the General 
Conference shall be governed in its action by the current 
edition of Robert's Rules of Order. 

Rule 42. Persons Without Right to 
Make or Second Motions 

A person seated in the Conference with the right to speak, 
but without vote, does not have the right to make a motion 
or second motions. 



THE 

EPISCOPAL 

ADDRESS 



Delivered by Bishop F. Gerald Ensley on Monday 

morning, April 17, 1972, for the Council of 

Bishops of The United Methodist Church 

Mr. Chairman, Members of the General Conference of 1972, 
and Friends : 

The passing of the weeks has brought us to the quadren- 
nial session of the General Conference. Since our meeting 
in 1968, 17 bishops of The United Methodist Church have 
entered into the service of the Church Eternal : 

Newell S. Booth Juan E. Gattinoni 

Benjamin I. Guansing Raymond J. Wade 

Matthew W. Clair, Jr. Odd Hagen 

Wilbur E. Hammaker George Edward Epp 

W. Y. Chen Raymond L. Archer 

Herbert Welch Glenn R. Phillips 

Walter C. Gum J. Ralph Magee 

James C. Baker Everett W. Palmer 
Costen J. Harrell 

It is not hard to praise these men, for they were famous. 
They were among them the father of the Wesley Foundation 
movement, the executive of the great Church-wide crusades 
following World War II, the son and namesake of one of the 
first black general superintendents, the longest-lived bishop 
in the memory of the Church, a president of the World 
Methodist Council, global statesmen who served in China, 
Korea, Argentina, Scandinavia, Africa, the Philippines, 
South-East Asia, not to mention the Alaskan frontier, and 
one of the stalwarts of the Evangelical United Brethren 
Church. They were not only brothers beloved but sought 
for in the councils of the Church. The classic words of 
Ecclesiasticus seem almost to have been written in their 
honor : 

Men like them maintain the fabric of the world, 
The handiwork of their craft was their prayer. 

205 



206 Journal of the 1972 General Coyiference 

GROWING TOGETHER 

We are pleased to report that since our last quadrennial 
meeting in 1968 The United Methodist Church has grown 
steadily together. The Articles of Union of the Evangelical 
United Brethren Church and The Methodist Church per- 
mitted three quadrenniums — until 1980 — for the assimila- 
tion of the annual conferences. Now in 1972 — in one-third 
of the time allowed — all the former conferences have been 
joined. The EUBs, who because of size have been asked 
more completely to sacrifice their identity, have shown a 
splendid willingness to yield all that a new and stronger 
church plight emerge. Many Methodists have found historic 
Methodist essentials, like the emphasis on inner piety and 
kindliness of personal relationship in conference affairs, 
more convincingly exhibited by their EUB colleagues than 
they had known in their own Methodist fellowship. All of 
us have profited by the marriage of the two denominations. 
No one has really lost by the union and much has been 
gained. We wonder now why we did not do it before. 

There has been a corresponding drawing together of black 
and white Methodists. Granted the pressure of events, there 
has been also the constraint of the Christian ideal, one of 
the evidences of the Spirit's working. The miracle of union 
is taking place, defying the prophets of pessimism. The 
Central Jurisdiction has been dissolved. Only four of the 
former conferences of that body are in existence. The black 
members of clergy and laity have shown their capacity and 
willingness at every level to contribute to the Church. We 
have had new visions of how good and pleasant it is for 
men and women of differing races to dwell together. 

We have made great progress through appropriate leg- 
islation. The time has come for us to show in our personal 
relationship as churchmen that kindly affection toward one 
another that we profess, and that basic justice that makes 
no distinction in Christ between Jew and Greek, bond and 
free, male and female, and to live and work together joy- 
fully, from an ungrudging heart! 

There has been a drawing together, too, of United Meth- 
odism and the Mother of us all, the British Conference. The 
General Conference of 1968 voted that the General Con- 
ference of United Methodism and the British Conference, 
upon parallel action by the British, v/ould exchange mem- 
berships. Some of us have been highly privileged to sit in 
their Conference as bona fide members. We are happy today 
to welcome a delegation who come to us from the homeland 
of our church. They are here not as fraternal delegates, 
onlookers as it were, but as brothers and sisters, voting 



The United Methodist Church 207 

members and rightful participants, in this Conference. This 
marks a milestone in our common history. 

The only apparent exception to the centripetal movement 
of United Methodism is the increasing autonomy of 
churches formerly belonging to the General Conference but 
overseas from the United States. Twenty conferences have 
withdrawn to join national church bodies or to become in- 
dependent denominations. These changes have been effected 
through their desire and with this Conference's blessing. 
While we are legally separate, they have remained in the 
larger Methodist family and have become constituents of the 
World Methodist Council, which has grown from 19 to 55 
members. This organization has for almost a century kept 
the far-flung Methodist family in touch and currently is 
represented with other world confessional bodies in Geneva. 

PERVASIVE CHANGE 

The decisive fact of these days on which the Church's 
life has fallen is pervasive change. The whole culture dins 
into our ears that we must yield to the demands of a new 
age, or break before its inexorable pressures, or retreat 
into the limbo of the obsolete. The stress on change orig- 
inates, perhaps, in the studies of the scientists, where new 
conceptions of the world come daily to birth. Alfred North 
Whitehead, probably the profoundest philosopher of science 
of our generation, declared in th3 1940's that there was not 
a single concept of the Newtonian physics which he had 
been taught as truth at Trinity College, Cambridge, that 
had not been displaced. The body of basic truth about the 
universe is continually changing. The shifts in theory work 
themselves out in new industries, and new industries call 
new cities into life, and the cities evoke new modes of living. 
The world has altered more in the lifetime of most of us 
than it did in the 500 years preceding. 

The social consequences of scientific change are a threat 
to our accustomed ways. Thanks to the new modes of com- 
munication, science has made it possible for the underprivi- 
leged to see first-hand w^hat the scientifically favored enjoy 
and what every human being might have. These visions of 
the better beget wants, ''a revolution of expectations." The 
have-nots all over the world have awakened, and, encour- 
aged by the examples they see, are demanding a different 
sort of life. These same powers of communication have 
undermined our historic isolation from one another. A uni- 
versal society with different mores is emerging. The im- 
proved means have worked for a basic equality. As 
Napoleon observed two centuries ago, gunpowder makes all 
men the same height. The scientific weapons b2came the 



208 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

property of the unscientific, who have ways now of enforc- 
ing their demands for equality and separate nationhood. 

The advances in science make for health and consequent 
longer life. Longer life begins overpopulation. Unless the 
birth and death-rates change considerably, we are told that 
in the next twenty-eight years — by the year 2000 — the 
numbers of human beings on the earth will increase more 
than the entire population presently living on our planet. 
Science, our modern Providence, threatens to become our 
Nemesis. 

The tremendous changes in technology have multiplied 
the power to produce and have released thousands from 
agricultural labor. They have moved to the cities, evoking 
all the familiar phenomena of urbanization. Two-thirds of 
the earth's population, it is said, are now living in metropol- 
litan areas. We have before us a prospect of not only cities 
but complexes of cities. Whereas the ancient Psalmist cried 
in his distress for a city in which he and his fellows might 
dwell, the unfortunate of our day will mourn that there is 
no countryside in which they may abide. If it be true that 
the great traditions of religion belong to the country, the 
hardest days, religiously speaking, may be ahead of us. 

Indeed, it is the spiritual problems that swift change 
evokes that are of the greatest concern to the Christian 
faith and to its servant, the Church. Scientific advance 
makes for self-sufficiency. Man does not seem to need God 
any more. By his increasing technical skills man can shape 
his environment and control his destiny. Men have suc- 
ceeded by their own efforts in bringing about what no God 
had done for His worshippers in thousands of years. Even 
many of the time-honored offices of religion are preempted 
by Science: we don't seem to need salvation when we have 
psychiatry; we don't need priests to bless the fields at the 
time of planting, to ensure their fertility, we have tractors ; 
and what is the use of prayer for health when you have 
penicilhn? Why aspire to heaven when so many heavenly 
goods are available on earth? Worldly success has cut the 
cords of dependence which leads to the heart of religion. 

The omnipresence of change makes for a still more in- 
sidious adversary for religion. If everything is changing, 
then our moral judgments are transitory, too. The impera- 
tives of the Bible no longer hold. For a certain kind of logic 
we are no more required to think as the men of the first 
century than to adopt their modes of transportation. There 
are "points of view" in religion but no knowledge. Hence, 
confusion reigns in the moral realm, and no religious faith 
that is confused as to its values can be aggressive. In wide 
areas of contemporary human experience the Christian 



The United Methodist Church 209 

ethic is frankly regarded as obsolete. Moral relativism is 
in the saddle, and there are few value-guides for earnest 
and aspiring men in our day. 

This moral relativism is very easily transmuted into a 
prejudice against the past. If a theory or an object belongs 
to the pre-modern it is per se invalid. This is a 7i02u genera- 
tion. Age, v^^hich once commended a person, an institution, 
or an idea has become a reproach. This worship of the 
present seriously damages an historical faith like Christian- 
ity which affirms that its deity became flesh 1900 years 
ago. That which has always been the strength of Chris- 
tianity — its historicity — has to a thoroughly modern mind 
become a handicap. 

A further effect of social change is intergroup conflict. 
The gap widens between youth and age, between the for- 
ward and the backward nation. History is farther away. 
When we ponder the fact that for both John Wesley and 
the Apostle Paul the fastest modes of travel were the horse 
and the sailing ship, John Wesley is nearer to St. Paul 
than he is to us. The older generation finds it increasingly 
difficult to keep up; the elder feels like a stranger and 
sojourner even in his own land. Since it is no longer a mat- 
ter of reason or intrinsic worth to which we may appeal, 
conflict becomes the arbiter of our differences. 

No wonder, then, that the note of doom has sounded 
increasingly. We are reminded that we are coming to the 
close of a mode of life that has hung together for centuries. 
The Church, along with the culture that encompasses it, 
is making for its end. 

Before we permit this oft-cited fact of change to intimi- 
date us, however, we might profitably exercise some criti- 
cism upon it. Change implies the unchanging. It is a simple 
fact of perception that if everything were changing, includ- 
ing ourselves, we would never know it. The movement of 
the hands of the clock of history is perceptible only against 
a permanent dial, a framework of judgment that the mind 
brings to it. It is never a question for thoughtful people 
whether everything is changing but rather what things are 
changeable, what are relative to time and place, and what 
things are stable. Just as the appearance of the Washington 
Monument in yonder capital is relative to where the observ- 
er stands yet also presupposes something objectively there, 
so the moral insights of towering saints abide beyond and 
in spite of each generation's perspectives. 

Further, however new the goods that we enjoy may be, 
not all of the evils of our age are of our making. Many 
of them are sins that have confronted religious men from 
the beginning. Many of our most challenging questions are 



210 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

hand-me-downs, modern variants of timeless issues. Yes, 
our day is perilous; but life has always been dangerous. 
And where did we get the notion that until about fifty 
years ago life was "normal?" Do we worry about the seem- 
ing irreligiousness of youth? Then read the annals of Yale 
University for the year 1800, where a complaint is regis- 
tered that not a single student at Yale would admit that he 
was a Christian. Do we say that we do not hear the Gospel 
from our pulpits any more? Then read the report of Wil- 
liam Blackstone, the famed jurist, who in the year 1780 
confessed that after hearing every eminent preacher in 
London he had not heard a single discourse that had more 
Christianity in it than the writings of Cicero, and that he 
was never able to discover from what he heard v/hether the 
preacher was a follower of Confucius, or of Mahomet, or of 
Christ ! These are different times — and in a few important 
respects crucially like other times. 

GENUINE ACHIEVEMENT 

Despite the bewildering tempo of the times the Church 
has gone about its work and can report genuine achieve- 
ments. In a day when money for religious enterprises is 
not easy to find, the claims of God upon our possessions 
have been faithfully presented. Since the General Confer- 
ence of 1968 adjourned to the present hour The United 
Methodist Church has given at a rate of $113 million annu- 
ally to benevolences — $450 million a quadrennium ! Included 
in this figure are over $7 million collected and disbursed by 
the United Methodist Commission for Overseas Relief and 
approximately $12 million designated for the Fund for Rec- 
onciliation, which has assisted more than 1,100 projects 
among the underprivileged of our constituency, not to men- 
tion $55 million raised by the Women's Society of Christian 
Service. These amounts have been given in addition to the 
cost of maintenance of our many churches and local min- 
istries, estimated to be $2.5 billion. 

The Council of Bishops is fully aware of the criticisms 
that may be leveled at statistics of this sort. We realize that 
in proportion to what we have, we have not hurt ourselves. 
We know that if all United Methodists were to tithe we 
would multiply our benefactions several times. Neverthe- 
less, even in a day of astronomical figures, 450 million 
benevolent dollars deserve more than a sneer. The impulse 
to share with others — one of the decisive marks of Chris- 
tian discipleship — is alive within the Church. 

We are blessed in our operations by lay people of high 
devotion and financial competence who not only have led 
us in promotion and given liberally themselves, but whose 



The United Methodist Church 211 

integrity is our assurance as we keep and disburse the mon- 
ies that have been entrusted to the Church. 

We have continued to keep a great program of outreach 
and service going. The Board of Missions of The United 
Methodist Church has more than 1,500 fulltime mission- 
aries and deaconesses in the United States and throughout 
the world. While the present missionary force is only a 
third of the contingent of 75 years ago, the number of na- 
tional workers in the missionary cause has increased ten- 
fold. If "to multiply the doers," as Dr. John R. Mott used 
to say, is the goal of Christian effort, our missionary endeav- 
or has not failed. Christian service and the evangelistic 
thrust of World Missions requires continuous support in 
terms of personnel and funds. We urge that every congrega- 
tion in United IMethodism seek to increase its awareness of 
missionary obligation and opportunity and its participation 
in doing what our Lord declared His disciples would do as 
believers in Him. 

Perhaps as significant as its labors is its persistent and 
comprehensive education of our people in the meaning of 
discipieship. It teaches that we cannot escape our mandate 
to preach the Good News to the poor, proclaim liberty to 
the captives, give sight to the blind, set free the oppressed, 
as well as to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord. Our 
mission is to use our means for the sake of the disad- 
vantaged. Further, missionary endeavor is an aid to the 
global mind. Nothing damages parochialism quite so much 
as a tour of the missionary installations of the Church. The 
Christian community, connected by its nature to peace and 
reconciliation, makes no greater contribution than through 
its concerned service. 

The Women's Society, associated now for a number of 
years with the Board of Missions, has been an educator of 
the first rank. This fine organization has been celebrating 
the centenary of the first woman missionaries to India and 
the founding of a school and hospital on the continent of 
Asia. In that great land Christian women are coming to 
places of leadership in social and political life, as well as 
the Church, in consequence of the inspiration and sub- 
stantive help of the Women's Society. 

The Church has steadily ministered to health and welfare. 
It sponsors in varying degrees 338 hospitals, homes for the 
aging, and child care agencies. Almost $50 million have 
come from local churches and conferences for reduction of 
the volume of pain, of which the earth is so full. 

To social concerns the Church is growing more sensitive. 
We are coming to realize, thanks to the prophets, that the 
Gospel has a social dimension. Do not misunderstand. We 



212 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

are not saying that the Church increasingly agrees as to 
the requirements of the Gospel in contemporary society. 
But that the Church should have a concern for the world 
in which men live is acknowledged more and more. There 
is little defense now for the long-time dictum that the ex- 
clusive mission of the Church is to "save souls," or that "you 
can't legislate morals," or that "if we could get everybody 
to the altar our problems would vanish." We have come to 
see some truths better than our fathers : that life is corpor- 
ate in its essence — we were born into a society when we 
came into the world and social reference is no mere addi- 
tive ; that if God is God He is Lord of the state, of the eco- 
nomic order, of the schools, as well as of the worshipping 
community, and we have an obligation to fulfill His will 
institutionally as well as individually; that men act differ- 
ently in the social group, hence a society is more than the 
simple summation of the individuals who make it up ; that 
preventive medicine is as relevant to social ills as bodily 
ailments — it is too late to do much about war after the 
hostilities have started; that we must not be too pure to 
employ power and self-interest for ends that love dictates ; 
that a new social order is on the way, and that if churchmen 
are committed to do nothing, or merely to sew patches on 
the old garment, we shall have an increasingly unChristian 
society; and while the Church may not have the whole an- 
swer, it is in a favorable position to get controversial issues 
up and thought about. 

We recognize the social concern in the Church is not an 
unmixed blessing. There is as much dogmatism in the pulpit 
now on social issues as when orthodoxy was in flower; 
there are persons who can give in five minutes a definitive 
answer to problems that those who have devoted a lifetime 
of study are unsure about; we have congregations whose 
sabbath portion is a discussion of the war in Vietnam, or 
the latest racial demonstration, or the next election, or the 
most recent word from the high priests of ecology, and who 
rarely hear the note of personal penitence, or of divine 
pardon, or of holiness of life, or of the world to come. Never- 
theless, we should be grateful for the freedom of the pulpit 
bought by those daring to exercise it. 

During the last four years the Church has done its work 
against the dark backdrop of war. The Bishops' Call for 
Peace and Self-Development asks that our people in peni- 
tence renounce the practical atheism of armed conflict. We 
should perfect programs of development of world resources, 
control of population, restraint of nationalism by the sanc- 
tion of both justice and international organization with even- 
tual disarmament, that the nations may learn war no more. 



The United Methodist Church 213 

We welcome the continued movement toward involvement 
in the Universal Church. At practically every ecumenical 
level The United Methodist Church has played a role, from 
local councils of churches to the World Council of Churches. 
It was present at the birth of the Federal Council of 
Churches, the predecessor of the present National Council 
of Churches. It was a charter member of the current Con- 
sultation on Church Union. At the moment the form that 
the Great Church shall take has not been revealed. There 
appears to be less enthusiasm for one giant administrative 
unit. Perhaps the way out is some form of organic plural- 
ism, where the families of Christendom retain their identi- 
ty, but maintain a closer than a merely federative relation 
to one another. At least, there are several norms that we 
may observe, besides the practical activities so widely 
shared at the moment. We may insist that every union 
scheme shall involve unity of membership in the whole body. 
It should encompass oneness of ministry: an ordination in 
one church shall mean ordination in the whole Church, with 
its corollary of complete intercommunion. It shall mean full 
and, if necessary, compulsory comity in the location of indi- 
vidual congregations and in missionary expansion. If these 
ends could be secured the greatest reproaches to our divided 
Christendom would be met, and we could trust time and 
negotiations between the branches of Christendom to re- 
solve the issues of polity. 

CAUSES FOR CONCERN 

While there are causes for satisfaction in the achieve- 
ments of the Church, there are matters, too, of grave con- 
cern. Among these are most crucially the considerable drop 
in church school attendance. In the last ten years the en- 
rollment has fallen 25 percent. College and university min- 
istries confess an equally disturbing decline. Many of our 
student groups at the state colleges, once our pride, are 
but shadows of their former selves. Of course, we recognize 
that statistics can be a snare. Certainly increases in num- 
bers do not necessarily betoken excellence. But quite as 
surely the phenomenon of dwindling numbers is convincing 
evidence that all is not well with our ministry to youth. We 
must beware of facile diagnoses of our ailments, of course, 
such as blaming it on the literature or the mode of organiza- 
tion. All things considered we have never enjoyed a higher 
quality of literature or instruction in the memory of those 
knowledgeable in this phase of the church's work. Notwith- 
standing, our numbers are shrinking, and if we are not to 
lose a generation of children, education must become again 
a basic concern of the Church. Who is to shape the minds of 



214 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

the rising generation — the movie producers, the television 
programmers, the authors of paperback fiction, or the 
spiritual tutors of mankind? Walk around the reported 
estimate that the average American family spends four 
hours daily before the television screen. Without any judg- 
ments as to the moral level of television's offerings, and the 
high quality of its technical performance, the TV tube does 
not offer the Christian interpretation of life, either in intent 
or actuality. A generation fed solely on such fare will not 
be spiritual giants on the morrow. This General Conference 
should not strike its tents until it has fashioned a program 
or engendered enthusiasm for retrieving the educational 
ground that has been lost. Our mandate is the same as of 
old — to go and teach all nations, including all ages, all 
classes, the meaning and glory of the Christian way. 

There are proposals before us for the restructuring of 
boards and agencies. As we engage in such activity we are 
always in danger of surrender to the fallacy of structure. 
Reacting to the jaunty notion that structure is not impor- 
tant we may fly to the other extreme and act as though 
structure in itself guarantees life, new spirit. There is be- 
fore the Conference a scheme for adoption. It goes consider- 
ably beyond what was envisaged by the Joint Committee of 
Church Union for a commission to complete at board levels 
the work achieved to bring the two churches together. It 
will be the responsibility of this Conference to evaluate 
the plan presented. We are confident that the General Con- 
ference will consider several alternatives and combinations 
of alternatives for the structure of the Church. 

A concern of a different kind is the rise of power-groups 
in our society. They are creatures of the revolutionary days 
through which we are living. Bold and resourceful men 
have discovered that a group, even small in numbers, with 
power tactics and en bloc voting and without inhibition 
about making a nuisance of itself, and willing to persist de- 
spite adverse public opinion, cannot only draw attention to 
its cause but multiply its practical effectiveness by ten, Un- 
dergirded by the notion that the way out for society is 
relatively simple, and that force is the ultimate decision- 
maker, such groups have sallied forth to capture control of 
their society. In the last ten years such bands, when not 
gaining overt control, have leveled their societies by their 
violence. This viable success has been so great in political 
life that its philosophy, if not its tactics, has invaded the 
church, the school, and the higher institutions of our life. 

The caucus, however, when employed by responsible per- 
sons can serve usefully in a changing time. It can sensitize 
the majority to keenly felt but unexpressed needs. It can 



The United Methodist Church 215 

remind the majority of its unconscious hypocrisies and in- 
justices. It can help to bring social forces into balance. In 
this quadrennium the Council of Bishops has met with 
caucuses of youth and ethnic minorities for mutual enlight- 
enment and enlarged goodwill. 

One of the great needs of The United Methodist Church 
at this hour is men and women who have the luell-being of 
the Church as a ivhole as their first loyalty. 

For there is no reason in history to suppose that the 
Church and its divisions are exempt from the universal 
law, expressed by our Lord in Matthew's Gospel, that "a 
house divided against itself shall not stand." 

Another problem of still different variety is that occa- 
sioned by our institutions. There is no church in the world 
with a finer cluster of colleges, hospitals, and homes for 
the dependent young and old than The United Methodist 
Church. But the Church in many cases finds them increas- 
ingly costly to finance. They are forced to go beyond the 
circle of the Church to find support, and then the principle 
begins to come into play that he who pays the fiddler calls 
the tune. Often the tune is not devotional! The justification 
of church-related institutions is that they be Christian. 

What is our policy to be? Some would say we should 
assume the support of the institutions and tighten our con- 
trol. Others would say that we should turn them free, per- 
mitting the Church to become emeritus. Still others would 
argue for a servant rather than a managerial relationship, 
such as providing chaplaincies, auxiliary assistance, and 
the like. 

We do not claim to have the answer. But could not this 
Conference come to grips with the issue? How many of 
our annual conferences are in bafflement as to what their 
role vis-a-vis their institutions ought to be! These confer- 
ences desire — and deserve — guidelines for policy. There are 
few in a Conference like this but who have received benefits, 
sometimes beyond our power to repay. Not a few of us have 
a stake in them by reason of long-time service and benev- 
olence. Christian institutions aim to develop a life rather 
than merely a healthy body or a sharper mind. They create 
a climate where Christian morality can thrive. Educational- 
ly, by their idealism they build an intolerance of mediocrity, 
ethical as well as cultural. In a mass society they foster a 
concern for individuals. Could the General Conference of 
the Church not come to our help at least with instruction 
as to what we should do in these days so decisive for our 
institutions' future? 

A perennial concern of the episcopacy is, of course, the 
ministry. For the moment it seems as though the number of 



216 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

men and women offering themselves is adequate. For one 
thing, the number of churches has declined. In the last 
decade the pastoral appointments have dropped more than 
6 percent, while the number of pastors has increased almost 
10 percent. The decline in the aggregate of appointments is 
not as ominous as it would appear. It is a part of the same 
broad social force that is putting country schools out of 
business. Just as the decline in country school statistics, 
however, does not mean the end of learning, so the closing 
or merger of small churches does not in itself spell the end 
of piety. But while the decrease in churches and the increase 
of clergy are not decisive, still, the number of good ministers 
of Jesus Christ is not greater than it has ever been. Men 
of skilled compassion, moved by the desire to minister rath- 
er than to be ministered to, are in short supply, as they 
probably always will be. 

We witness in the ministry what is called in the jargon 
of urban sociology "the flight to the suburbs" — and from 
two directions. One is the departure out of the city of fine 
citizens, leaving grand old buildings stranded, without ade- 
quate support and resourceful leadership. We have faithful 
priests staying with dwindling congregations. But this con- 
tinuance in many cases is taxing the resources of other 
churches to sustain a ministry to small numbers. 

There is another flight to the suburbs that is quite as 
full of significance. It is as much a spiritual matter as of 
bread-and-butter support. There is a strand of clerical 
psychology which looks on ministry to the small town and 
country as a consolation prize. There are men in our min- 
istry who regard appointment to a small town as a demo- 
tion, even though size of congregation and financial compen- 
sation may be greater than might be had in the city. We 
must not, however, forget the heroic labors of men in our 
ministry who serve large circuits uncomplainingly and 
bring to underprivileged communities the hope of the Gos- 
pel. Our situation calls for a deeper pastoral devotion of 
all our ministry to men and women for God's sake, whether 
they worship on the city square or at a crossroads. 

CHRISTIAN FAITH ON THE DEFENSIVE 

Perhaps the deepest concern of all is the decline of Chris- 
tian belief during our time. It is the root of our other mal- 
adies. We give less, because we are not convinced that reli- 
gion really matters. Attendance is down, because we are 
not so sure as in other days that anything significant really 
happens at church. There are antipathies in our congrega- 
tions and unchristian conduct among churchmen because, 
really, "you lose out in a world like ours if you are Chris- 



The United Methodist Church 217 

tian." If there is a lack of sacrifice in our ministry, well, 
the scheme of things does not seem to favor devotion. 

We live in a time when the Christian faith is on the 
defensive. We find it harder to believe than our fathers did. 
Probably not for centuries has the witness of Christian 
people on ultimate questions been so hesitant and uncer- 
tain. Most men want to believe in something worthy of 
belief, but they do not seem to find it in Christianity. Prob- 
ably the urge to love one's human neighbor is as strong as 
ever, but for hosts of church members the vertical dimen- 
sion has all but dropped out. There seems to be no longer a 
settled framework whose reality we can be sure of and 
which gives us stability and constancy of direction. We are 
told that there are still people who think God exists, and 
some who don't, and it is impossible to tell who is right, 
but, after all, does it really matter? There are hundreds of 
wistful skeptics in our churches. They would like to have 
the certainties of our fathers, but in the honesty of their 
hearts they do not have them. They are not bad people. 
Many of them "exhibit every Christian virtue, except faith," 
and some of them are ministered to by those with only a 
modicum of faith to share. 

Now this situation is not the consequence of the Gospel's 
disproof. There is no evidence that God has ceased to be. 
If God — the Source of life and the Sustainer of existence — 
were really dead we would not be here to talk about it. 
Our civilization is a doubting Thomas on religion not be- 
cause there is no evidence for theistic belief; in our busy- 
ness and this-worldly concern we simply have let belief fade 
out. The atmosphere of our way of life has infected us. We 
defer excessively to current fashions of thinking. We sell 
out to novelties and curiosities. We relish the gifts which 
science has brought, and are as hard put to answer the 
question directed to the Bishop of Woolwich as he was, 
"What have you as a Christian to offer me as an atheist," 
said a critic, "that I do not already have?" We surrender 
to naturalism, the theory that nature and its laws are all 
there is, or explain all, or are all that really count. Sense- 
knowledge is the primary form of knowledge; the deliver- 
ances of conscience are, therefore, "nonsense." The methods 
of the natural sciences are the only reliable instrument for 
distinguishing what is valid from what is not. 

But, perhaps most of all, we Americans at least, are not 
a reflective people. We have never thoroughly and systemat- 
ically faced ultimate problems. When a college professor, 
for instance, in recent years said that God is dead, the 
faithful met the onslaught with what Borden Parker Bowne 
referred to as "a volley of shudders." We almost never bring 



2l8 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

seriously to question the modern standpoint. With our con- 
temporaries we assume it. Indeed, we sometimes act as 
though the sign of maturity is that we can cherish moral 
ambiguities. It is hard to present a supernatural faith to 
a naturalistically minded age; it is doubly hard when the 
evangelist himself is doubtful. 

Do not misunderstand. For all its faults, this is a better 
world than that in which Christianity first made its way. 
One of the miracles of our day is the host of devoted men 
and women of every race and nation who find in Christ 
the Lord of life. In a world which discourages us with its 
bigness, its cruelty, and its suffering, there are many who 
still cherish Christ in their hearts. There are stirrings in 
our young people that are prophetic of better things. We 
cannot forget when prompted to brood over the failings 
of the time the sensitiveness of Christians to social needs 
far surpassing our fathers. Notwithstanding, there is a 
slow attrition of Christian belief that must become a first 
concern. The supply of Christian motivation is running pre- 
cariously low. Our prayer should be that of the man of the 
New Testament, "We believe ; help thou our unbelief." 

Granted that we cannot demonstrate the truth of the 
Christian Gospel, neither can any one show it to be ground- 
less. (Indeed, among the thoughtful there is as much dis- 
illusionment with the secular creed as the Christian faith. ) 
Admittedly, to claim that we can prove the existence of God 
is too much, but to say that it is merely an hypothesis is 
too little. Faith is one of those life-determining options 
whose certainty can be celebrated only by the faithful at 
the end of the journey. Our task as a Christian body is so 
to present and to exemplify the Christian ideal that men 
will feel it to be true, as well as good, and live for it as 
earnestly as for material ends, and until the life experience 
has had the opportunity to verify itself. 

REGAINING CHRISTIAN CONVICTION 

What can we do to regain Christian conviction? First, 
we can conceive the Christian Gospel once more as it has 
been in the days of its greatest strength — as a redemptive 
faith. It was originally a response of grateful men to God's 
saving concern. It must be so again. For the reconception 
of the message we need the assistance of our theologians. 
They have given us excellent expositions of natural theol- 
ogy, which is basic. They have offered us cogent formula- 
tions of social theology, of the imperatives of the Gospel 
for the political and economic order. We need also a state- 
ment convincing to modern men that ours is a redemptive 
universe. God not only creates ; He saves. He also has pro- 



The United Methodist Church 219 

vided means for the overcoming of evil and the recovery of 
blessedness. We need not only a theology of Genesis I, and 
of the prophet Amos, but of Luke 15, the finding of the 
lost. 

This does not mean that we resign from the social em- 
phasis. The redemption of society is an important chapter 
in the chronicle of redemption. Traditional evangelism was 
right in its strategy of changing the individual. Its fault 
vv^as that it did not change him enough. It made him, per- 
haps, a reader of the Bible, a faithful attendant at church 
and a more loving husband and father. But it did not always 
change his views as a citizen, or his practices as an em- 
ployer, or as an investor of wealth, or as a neighbor. It is 
fatuous to talk about redemption of men unless we can save 
them from the wars that destroy them, from the ghettoes 
that fetter them, from the ideals of mammon that seduce 
thsm. We need a convincing theology, without the obscur- 
antisms and medievalism, that will move men to repentance 
and inspire a victory over the things that are spoiling both 
our individual and collective lives. The Church will not be 
renewed by lectures of theism, though these have their place. 
The altars of the Church have been filled with seekers when 
she was able to convince them that God was in Christ, recon- 
ciling His children to Himself. We must see the redemptive 
task again as basic and build it upon a world-view that 
requires it. 

Secondly, we may engage in a more intensive study of the 
Bible. The Scripture is the soul of Christianity. Even if the 
Church were destroyed and Christianity as an organized 
movement ceased to be, if the Bible were preserved, its 
record of divine love would in time generate another Chris- 
tianity. But if the Bible ever were to be abandoned, Chris- 
tianity will be done for. A first task in the recovery of the 
Christian faith is a widespread study of the Bible by the 
rank and file of Christian people. 

We have not yet explored in depth the possibility of a 
corporate study of the Scriptures. Suppose that some year 
The United Methodist Church would earnestly study as a 
body the Gospel of Luke, or the Letter to the Romans, or 
the mighty canvass of the final victory of faith, the theme 
of the Book of Revelation. Suppose it were done under the 
tutelage of its ministry, and the parish ministers under 
the leading of their superintendents and bishops. God only 
knows what such a study might bring in increased loyalty, 
gladness, and religious creativity to the membership of the 
Church. 

Once more, the Church must invite men and women to 
commitment. To proclaim the Gospel is a minimum; we 



220 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

must seek also for acceptance. We are aware that what 
was once the practice of the Church has fallen into disfavor. 
We have said that modern people do not want to be censured 
for their sins and urged to come to Jesus. One wonders 
sometimes, however, if men are not more willing to respond 
than the Church to invite. Certainly the Master did not 
hesitate to ask men to follow him, and his great apostle 
affirmed that we m.ake full proof of our ministry when we 
do the work of an evangelist. The offer of redemption 
through Christ opens the door to those who might not other- 
wise come, and it blesses with increased ardor those who 
extend the invitation. 

It is to be hoped that this Conference will feel moved to 
join other communions in this land in the program of "Key 
'73" and with other members of the world-wide Methodist 
family in their emphasis culminating on evangelism, and 
ending in 1975. 

On the occasion of the bicentennial of Wesley's birth, 
Woodrow Wilson, then president of Princeton University, 
was asked to lecture at Wesleyan University on "John 
Wesley's Place in History." The future President of the 
United States responded with one of the most perceptive 
addresses of his career. Wesley lived, he told his hearers, 
in an age of great vitality, when England was both engaged 
in feverish expansion of its domains overseas and yet still 
caught in the toils of her great constitutional revolution, a 
time also when a galaxy of literary men held court — Pope, 
Goldsmith, Burke, Hume, Adam Smith, Gibbon, Cowper, 
Burns, and Samuel Johnson — a time when the terrific 
earthquake in France was sending its tremors before, and 
the mighty Industrial Revolution was being born. Into this 
age Wesley came — not to create life ; it was full of that — but 
to summon it to consciousness. As Wilson put it, "The eight- 
eenth century was not dead ; it was not even asleep it was 
only confused, unorganized, without authoritative leader- 
ship in matters of faith . . . uncertain of its direction. . . 
The time was ready and cried out for a spiritual revival." 
Wesley spoke, "and men's spirits responded, leaped at the 
message and were made wholesome as they comprehended 
it. It was a voice for which they had waited though they 
knew it not ... It was the voice of the century's longing 
found in the mouth of this one man." And Wilson adds that 
the great impulse of humane feeling v/hich marked the 
closing years of the century — the reform of prisons, the 
abolition of slavery, the establishment of missionary socie- 
ties, the philanthropies and legislative measures that were 
to lift the lot of the poor — in no small way occurred because 
a little Oxford don, with cap and bands and a warmed heart, 



The United Methodist Church 



221 



went everywhere trying as he phrased it, "by the grace of 
God to beget, preserve and increase the life of God in the 
souls of men." 

The parallels between the needs of our time and Wesley's 
should not be lost. 

May this General Conference be a servant of the same 
high purposes. And may the good God bless us with a tithe 
of his success ! 

Signed : 

Arthur J. Moore 
J. Waskom Pickett 
William C. Martin 
James H. Straughn 
Shot K. Mondol 
Clement D. Rockey 
Fred P. Corson 
W. Earl Ledden 
W. Angie Smith 
Paul E. Martin 
Paul N. Garber 
Willis J. King 
Charles W. Brashares 
John A. Subhan 
Lloyd C. Wicke 
John Wesley Lord 
Marvin A. Franklin 
Roy H. Short 
Richard C. Raines 
Marshall R. Reed 
H. Clifford Northcott 
Hazen G. Werner 
Gerald H. Kennedy 
Donald H. Tippett 
Jose L. Valencia 
Sante Uberto Barbieri 
Frederick B. Newell 
Edgar A. Love 
Edwin E. Voigt 
F. Gerald Ensley 
Friedrich Wunderlich 
Reuben H. Mueller 
Harold R. Heininger 
Prince A. Taylor, Jr. 
Eugene M. Frank 
Nolan B. Harmon 
Ralph E. Dodge 
Mangal Singh 
Gabriel Sundaram 



J. Gordon Howard 
Hermann W. Kaebnick 
Paul M. Herrick 
W. Maynard Sparks 
Fred G. Holloway 
W. Ralph Ward 
James K. Mathevn^s 
O, Eugene Slater 
W. Kenneth Pope 
Paul V. Galloway 
Aubrey G. Walton 
Kenneth W. Copeland 
Ralph T. Alton 
Edwin R. Garrison 
T. Otto Nall 
Charles F. Golden 
Noah W. Moore, Jr. 
James W. Henley 
Paul Hardin, Jr. 
J. Owen Smith 
Paul W. Milhouse 
Pedro Zottele 
W. Kenneth Goodson 
Edward J. Pendergrass 
H. Ellis Finger, Jr. 
Earl G. Hunt, Jr. 
D wight E. Loder 
Thomas M. Pryor 
Francis E. Kearns 
Lance Webb 
W. McFerrin Stowe 
R. Marvin Stuart 
James S. Thomas 
John Wesley Shungu 
ESCRIVAO A. Zunguze 
Harry P. Andreassen 
S. Trowen Nagbe 
A. J. Shaw 
Franz W. Schaefer 



222 



Journal of the 1972 Gerieral Conference 



L. Scott Allen 
Paul A. Washburn 

C. Ernst Sommer 
Alsie H. Carleton 

D. Frederick Wertz 
Roy C. Nichols 

A. James Armstrong 
William R. Cannon 
Abel T. Muzorewa 



Cornelio M. Ferrer 
Paul L. A. Granadosin 
R. D. JosHi 
Joseph R. Lance 
Eric A. Mitchell 
Federico J. Pagura 
Armin Haertel 
OLE E. Borgen 



Bishops of The United Methodist Church 



JOURNAL 

OF THE 

1972 GENERAL CONFERENCE 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

FIRST DAY, SUNDAY, APRIL 16, 1972 

EVENING SESSION 

Holy Communion 

The Service of Holy Communion was celebrated at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Civic Center, Atlanta, Georgia. The Sacrament vi^as administered 
by the Council of Bishops with the active participation of the several 
Jurisdictional Colleges of Bishops and representative Bishops of The 
United Methodist Church overseas. 

The Judicial Council joined the Council of Bishops in the proces- 
sional. 

The ministry of music was provided by the Clark College Choir 
under the direction of Prof. Calvin B. Grimes. 

The organist was Mr. John Dressier, Minister of Music, Peachtree 
Road United Methodist Church, Atlanta, Georgia. 

In charge of the ushering were Dr. Eugene Drinkard and Dr. 
Jonathan Jackson of Atlanta, Georgia. 

This service is the Alternate Ritual for Holy Communion prepared 
under the direction of the Commission on Worship of The United 
Methodist Church. 

The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper — Order of Service 

Prelude — "Fantasia in A Minor" J. S. Bach 

Greeting Bishop Paul Hardin, Jr., 

Columbia Area 

Grace and peace to you from God our Father and the Lord Jesus 

Christ. 

Amen. 

The Risen Christ is with us! 

Praise the Lord! 

Hymn of Praise— "HOLY, HOLY, HOLY! LORD GOD AL- 
MIGHTY!" 
Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty! 
Early in the morning our song shall rise to thee; 
Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and mighty; 
God in three persons, blessed Trinity! 

Holy, holy, holy! All the saints adore thee, 
Casting down their golden crowns around the glassy sea; 
Cherubim and seraphim falling down before thee, 
Which wert, and art, and evermore shall be. 

Holy, holy, holy ! Though the darkness hide thee. 
Though the eye of sinful man thy glory may not see; 

223 



224 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Only thou art holy ; there is none beside thee, 
Perfect in power, in love, and purity. 

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty! 

All thy works shall praise thy name in earth and sky and sea; 

Holy, holy, holy! merciful and mighty; 

God in three persons, blessed Trinity ! Amen. 

Confession and Pardon 

When we gather to praise God, we remember that we are his 
people who have preferred our wills to his. Accepting his power to 
become new persons in Christ, let us confess our sin before God 
and one another. 

Eternal Father, we confess that often we have failed to be an obe- 
dient Church: 

we have not done your will, 

we have broken your law, 

we have rebelled against your love, 

we have not loved our neighbors ; 

we have not heard the cry of the needy. 
Forgive us, we pray. 

Free us for joyful obedience, 

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 
Hear the good news: "Christ died for us while we were yet sinners; 
that is God's own proof of his love toward us." 
In the name of Jesus Christ you are forgiven ! 
In the name of Jesus Christ you are forgiven! 
Glory to God. Amen. 

Act of Praise — "Gloria Patri" 

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost; 
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world 
without end. Amen, Amen. 

Prayer for Illumination Bishop Paul A. Washburn 

Minnesota Area 
Lord, open our hearts and minds by the power of your Holy 
Spirit, that as the Scriptures are read and the Word proclaimed, 
we may hear with joy what you say to us today. Amen. 

First Scripture Lesson — Mark 14:22-26 

Anthem — "Rejoice My Soul" Milli Balakireff 

Clark College Choir, Atlanta 

Second Scripture Lesson — I Corinthians 1:4-24 

Bishop Joseph R. Lance 
Lucknow Area 

Sermon Bishop Charles W. Brashares 

Retired 

Affirmation Bishop John Wesley Shungu 

Zaire (Congo) Africa 
We believe in God: 

Who has created and is creating, 
who has come in the true man, Jesus, 

to reconcile and make new, 
who works in us and others by his Spirit. 
We trust him. 

He calls us to be in his Church: 
to celebrate his presence, 



The United Methodist Church 225 

to love and serve others, 

to seek justice and resist evil, 

to proclaim Jesus, crucified and risen, 
our judge and our hope. 
In life, in death, in life beyond death, 

God is with us. 
We are not alone. 
Thanks be to God. 

Prayers for Others Bishop W. Kenneth Pope 

Dallas-Fort Worth Area 
Let us pray: 

That the world may live in peace, and that the Church may 
achieve unity, fulfilling its service here and everyw^here : 
This is our prayer. 

That all ministers and teachers in the Church may be faithful 
servants of the gospel, leading others into its way of life and 
strengthening their faith : 
This is our prayer. 

That the leaders of this nation and of the world may govern with 
justice and mercy: 
This is our prayer. 

That all our work may be done for the common good; that it be 
done in safety; and that all may be spared from grinding toil 
which destroys fullness of life : 
This is our prayer. 

That those who work on frontiers of truth and those who enrich 
our lives with beauty and joy may be free to follow their vocations : 
This is our prayer. 

That those who suffer disease or poverty or loneliness or grief 
may be healed and comforted; that those who are oppressed or 
persecuted may be strengthened and delivered : 
This is our prayer. 

That those whom we have known and loved who have died in 
the faith may be a glorious memory to us and a source of renewed 
fellowship with all the saints : 
This is our prayer, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 

The Peace Bishop R. Marvin Stuart 

Denver Area 
Christ our Lord invites to his table all who love him and who desire 
to live in peace with one another. Therefore let us offer each other 
signs of reconciliation and love. 

The Offering 

As forgiven and reconciled people, let us offer ourselves and our 
gifts to God. 

Anthem — "Let Us Break Bread Together" 

Wayne Howorth 
Clark College Choir 
Thanksgiving — 

Bishop Roy C, Nichols and Bishop W. Kenneth Goodson 

Pittsburg Area Birmingham Area 

The Lord is with you. 
And with you also. 
Lift up your hearts. 
We lift them up to the Lord. 
Let us give thanks to the Lord our God. 
It is right to give him thanks and praise. 



226 Journal of the 1972 General Co7iference 

Father, it is right that we should always and everywhere give 

you thanks and praise. 

Only you are God. 

You created all things and called them good. 

You made us in your own image. 

Even when we rebelled against your love, 
you did not desert us. 

You delivered us from captivity, 

made covenant to be our God and King, 

and spoke to us through your prophets. 

Therefore, we join the entire company of heaven 

and all your people now on earth 

in worshiping and glorifying you : 
Holy, holy, holy Lord, God of power and might, 
heaven and earth are full of your glory. 

Hosanna in the highest. 
Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. 

Hosanna in the highest. 

We thank you, Father, 

that you loved the world so much 

you sent your only Son to be our Savior. 
The Lord of all life came to live among us. 

He healed and taught men, 

ate with sinners, 

and won for you a new people by water and the Spirit. 
We saw his glory. 

Yet he humbled himself in obedience to your will, 
freely accepting death on a cross. 
By dying, he freed us from unending death ; 
by rising from the dead, he gave us everlasting life. 

On the night in which he gave himself up for us, 

the Lord Jesus took bread. 
After giving you thanks, 

he broke the bread, 
gave it to his disciples, and said: 
Take, eat; this is my body which is given for you. 
When the supper was over, 

he took the cup. 
Again he returned thanks to you, 

gave the cup to his disciples, and said: 
Drink from this, all of you, 

this is the cup of the new covenant in my blood, 

poured out for you and many, 

for the forgiveness of sins. 
When we eat this bread and drink this cup, 

we experience anew the presence of the Lord Jesus Christ 

and look forward to his coming in final victory. 
Christ has died, 
Christ is risen, 
Christ will come again. 
We remember and proclaim. Heavenly Father, 

what your Son has done for us 

in his life and death, 

in his resurrection and ascension. 
Accept our sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving 

in union with Christ's offering for us, 

as a reasonable and holy surrender of ourselves. 
Send the power of your Holy Spirit on us. 



The United Methodist Church 227 

gathered here out of love for you, 

and on these gifts. 
Help us know 

in the breaking of this bread 

and the drinking of this wine 

the presence of Christ 

who gave his body and blood for mankind. 
Make us one with Christ, 

one with each other, 

and one in service to all mankind. 
Through your Son Jesus Christ, 

with the Holy Spirit in your Holy Church, 

all glory and honor is yours, Father. Amen. 
Our Father in heaven, 

holy be your name, 

your kingdom come, 

your will be done, 

on earth as in heaven. 
Give us today the bread we need. 
Forgive us our sins, 

as we forgive those who sin against us. 
Save us in the time of trial, 

and deliver us from evil. 
For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are j'ours, 

now and forever. Amen. 

The Breaking of Bread and Taking of the Cup 

Bishop Thomas M. Pryor 

Chicago Area 

Because there is one loaf, we, many as we are, are one body; 

for it is one loaf of which we all partake. 

When we break the bread, is it not a means of sharing in the 

body of Christ? 
When we give thanks over the cup, is it not a means of sharing 
in the blood of Christ? 

The Giving 

The body of Christ, given for you. 

Amen. 

The blood of Christ, given for you. 

Amen. 

Prayer After Receiving 

You have given yourself to us, Lord. 

Now we give ourselves for others. 

Your love has made us a new people; 

as a people of love we will serve you with joy. 

Your glory has filled our hearts; 

help us to glorify you in all things. Amen. 

Hymn — "For the Bread, Which Thou Hast Broken" 
For the bread, which thou hast broken, 
For the wine, which thou hast poured, . . 
For the words, which thou hast spoken, 
Now we give thee thanks, O Lord. 

By this pledge that thou dost love us. 
By thy gift of peace restored, 
By thy call to heaven above us. 
Hallow all our lives, O Lord. 



228 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 



With our sainted ones in glory 
Seated at our Father's board, 
May the Church that waiteth for thee 
Keep love's tie unbroken, Lord. 

In thy service, Lord, defend us; 
In our hearts keep watch and ward ; 
In the world where thou dost send us 
Let thy Kingdom come, O Lord. Amen. 

Benediction Bishop J. Owen Smith 

Atlanta Area 
Go out in peace to serve God and your neighbor in all that 
you do. 

We are sent in Christ's name. 
The blessing of Almighty God, 
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, 
is with you always. 
Amen. 

POSTLUDE — "Improvisation" 



SECOND DAY, MONDAY, APRIL 17, 1972 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The 1972 session of the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church convened in the Civic Center at Atlanta, 
Georgia, Monday, April 17, 1972, at 8:30 a.m., with Bishop 
Paul Hardin, Jr., of the Columbia Area, Southeastern Juris- 
diction, and President of the Council of Bishops, presiding. 

Bishop Hardin introduced Carlton R. Young (East Ohio), 
General Conference Director of Music, who announced the 
hymn, "O, For a Thousand Tongues to Sing." The Con- 
ference stood and joined in the singing of the hymn. Bishop 
Arthur J. Moore led the Conference in prayer. 

Bishop Arthur J. Moore: Let us pray. Eternal God, our Heavenly 
Father, at the beginning of this Conference we pause to worship 
thee. Thou art the source of our life and the strength of pilgrimage. 
Make us aware of thy presence and sensitive to thy will. We pray 
that thou will bless and prosper thy people called Methodist around 
the world. We pray for those who have authority in government 
over us but under thee. Impart to them purity in motive, right judg- 
ment in council and fairness in administration in order that their 
leadership may promote the establishment of peace and righteousness. 

Grant that neither through arrogance begotten of prosperity nor 
conceit bred in earthly success that they forget their dependence 
upon Thee. Give to thy children throughout the world strength for 
dealing with living, courage for every struggle, be with them in their 
complexity and success in their labors. We pray for this Conference. 
For these thy children here assembled seeking to give leadership to 
this part of Thy church, invade our hearts with quietness. Help us in 
all our deliberations to look beyond the problems related to these 
exciting times and remember that Christ goes before us. Enable us 
to be in the way with Christ but never in his way. Help us to remem- 
ber those invisible but invincible resources which are ours because 
we are thine. Prevent us from pitching our song in a minor key 
and help us to believe that Christ goes before us. Help us to remem- 
ber those deathless promises of Christ to be with us. Give us a gospel 
for this sinful and scornful world; help us to reject the subtle appeal 
of secularism, and make us a people whose God is the Lord. Give us 
a concern which will make us thirst for living water. Grant that 
the gospel we preach will contain not only the reform of the Old 
Testament but the redemption of men and society as promised in 
the New Testament. 

Help us to go to our task not with fear but with faith; not with 
crutch and bandage and quenched music but with the sound of 
trumpets and marching feet. Make us to be the heralds of the love 
of Christ and the diviners and the defenders of those moral and 
spiritual convictions which will save us from corruption. Keep us 
reverent, humble and open-minded, with sensitive souls attuned to thy 
will, and although our heads become gray keep our hearts young. 
May thy Spirit guide our thinking to revive our hearts and make 
us appear to do thy will. Empower afresh this United Methodist 
Church; give us a more tenacious hold upon those everlasting certain- 
ties which will make this Conference the birth place of a new spiri- 

229 



230 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

tual offensive, and our prayer is in the name of the Lord Jesus 
Christ. Amen. 

Candler School of Theology Choraliers 

Carlton Young presented the Choraliers from Candler 
School of Theology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, 
who sang two selections for the Conference. 

Roll Call— J. Wesley Hole, Secretary 

Bishop Hardin recognized J. Wesley Hole, Secretary of 
the General Conference, for the roll call. 

/. Wesley Hole (Southern California-Arizona) : Bishop Hardin, 
members of the General Conference. Our rules require that the roll 
shall be called by the Secretary in the following manner: first there 
shall be called the names of the bishops who have died since the 
adjournment of the preceding General Conference, and likewise the 
names of delegates-elect who have died. Would you please stand. 

Deceased Bishops: 

Bishop Raymond L. Archer, Bishop George Edward Epp, Bishop 
Costen J. Harrell, Bishop J. Ralph Magee, Bishop Everett M. 
Palmer, Bishop Glenn R. Phillips. 

Deceased delegates-elect: 

Frederick M. Darrow, John B. F. Williams, Moises Rodriguez. 

Deceased reserve delegates : 

Austin E. Betterly, John Hansen, Ralph Hays, W. Y. Jenkins, 
Jr., Joseph H. Wagner. 

Bishop Hardin: Our Father, as we pause for a moment in tribute 
of these of our colleagues and friends who have departed this fellow- 
ship to enter into a larger fellowship with thee, we give thee grateful 
thanks for their lives, for their service and for their devotion to the 
Church which we love and serve, and above that, to the Christ who 
is our Savior. As we remember them with loving gratitude, we pray 
at the same time for those of us who remain, that we may be faithful 
to the trust that is ours. In Christ's name we pray. Amen. 

/. Wesley Hole: May I say that every effort has been made to 
include the names of all who have died since their election. If any 
name has been missed, would you please advise us in order that the 
list may be complete in the Journal when it is printed. Second, the 
record of attendance of delegates and others shall be made in writing 
to the Secretary of the General Conference as follows : 

The Secretary of the Council of Bishops for the Bishops, 

The Secretary of the Judicial Council for that body. 

The Chairman of each Conference delegation for its membership. 

A blank has been prepared for each delegation for that purpose. 
It is in a large envelope on your desk. Instructions are printed on 
the blank. Please complete the information, sign the form, and turn 
it in to the roll call secretary here on the platform or in the secre- 
tary's office. Room 102, as soon as possible. This, Bishop Hardin, will 
complete the roll call. 

The Secretary of the Council of Bishops reported all 
bishops were present with the exception of Bishops 
Straughn, W. Angie Smith, Reed, Schaefer, and Werner. 

The Secretary of the Judicial Council reported all mem- 
bers were present. 



The United Methodist Church 231 

The delegation chairmen reported the following dele- 
gates were in attendance: 

Agra Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Sisa Masih Sagar 
Lay — Ambrose Barnes 
Alabama-West Florida Animal Conference (SE) 

Ministerial— Charles H. Hildreth, Paul A. Duffey, Joel D. McDavid, 

Robert L. Wilson, Ellis R. Dickerson, John E. Vickers 
Lay — Roy M. Jordan, Kenneth Cooper, John Creel, Foster Eich, 
Harry E. McDavid, Foy Campbell 
Angola Annual Conference {OS) 

Ministerial — Antonio Filipe de Freitas 
Lay — Nobre Pereira Fereira Dias 
Baltimore Annual Conference (A^E) 

Ministerial — David H. Andrews, Edward G. Carroll, E. William 
Hall, Forrest C. Stith, Frank L. Williams, F. Norman Van Brunt, 
Laverne E. Rohrbaugh, L. Carroll Yingling, Herbert L. D. Dog- 
gett, John B. Jones, Merrill W. Drennan 
Lay — Everett Jones, Thurman L. Dodson, Mrs. Helen Wicklein, W. 
Carroll Beatty, Carroll D. Bristow, Mary K. Will, Harry K. 
Underwood, Theodore E. Schiller, Thomas C. Blickenstaff, Mrs. 
Barbara Thompson, Charles L. Mann 
Bengal Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Pravash R. Mullick 
Lay — Emmanuel Marandi 
Bombay Annual Conference {OS) 
Ministerial — Justin N. Harris 
Lay — Vincent Bengers 
California-Nevada Annual Conference {W) 

Ministerial — Wilbur W. Choy, Arthur V. Thurman, John V. Moore, 
C. Douglas Hayward, Hamilton T. Boswell, Clifford S. Droke, 
Robert W. Moon 
Lay — Frank Webber, Richard O. Johnson, Grace Catterall, Melvin 
Brawn, Olivia Carrell, Glenn O. Booth, J. Everett Walker 
Central Alabama Annual Conference {SE) 
Ministerial — Charles L. Hutchinson 
Lay — Quenton D. Adams 
Central Congo Annual Conference {OS) 
Ministerial— Emile Museu 
Lay — Andre Ukunda 
Central Illinois Annual Conference {NC) 

Ministerial — Eugene J. Moore, Frank H. Nestler, Harold W. Loyd, 
R. Benjamin Garrison, Wayne C. Hess, Robert W. Thornburg, 
Dale E. Pitcher, E. Paul Unger, Jack B. North, James K. White 
Lay — Lloyd M. Bertholf, Mrs. Ellen Hanna, Reid Tombaugh, 
Richard Gantz, Mrs. Charles Galbreath, Walter W. Muller, 
Gerald Downie, Charlotte Gurtner 
Lay Reserves — George Bolinger, Anna Fox 
Central New York Annual Conference {NE) 

Ministerial — Robert J. McCune, Robert L. Homer, William R. 

Swales, Warren G. Odom 
Lay — Robert Mann, Mrs. Howard Totten 
Lay Reserves — Mrs. Stanley Robinson, Mrs. Robert McCune 
Central Pennsylvania Annual Conference {NE) 

Ministerial — Daniel L. Shearer, Paul E. Myers, William F. Woods, 

Thomas R. Springman, Martin W. Hopkins, Calvin H. Cole, 

Brian A. Fetterman, John B. Howes, Grantas E. Hoopert, Arthur 

W. Stambach 

Lay— Robert E. Knupp, Paul G. Gilmore, Charles E. Edgar, Earl D. 



232 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Warner, Mrs. Frank W. Ake, Ralph M. Ritter, Harry H. Jacobs, 
Jr., Mrs. Thomas J. Hopkins, Kenneth H. Plummer, H. Leroy 
Marlow 
Central Texas Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — William M. Greenwaldt, Eric C. Purnell, Gordon 
Dennis, Maggart B. Howell, Sidney Roberts, H. Brown Loyd 

Lay— Roy J. Grogan, Morris D. Walker, Mrs. W. V. Bane, Carroll 
Wilson, Dr. Alice Wonders, Eldon B. Mahon 
Costa Rica Annual Conference {OS) 

Lay — Roberto K. Vargas 
Czechoslovakia Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Vilem Schneeberger 

Lay — Vlastislav Malac 
Delhi Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — James Lai 

Lay— C. D. S. Newton 
Denmark Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Eigil Carlsen 

Lay — Frede Johansen 
Detroit Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial — Jesse R. Dewitt, James W. Bristah, James D. Cochran, 
Raymond R. Lamb, John E. Marvin, Robert E. Horton, Edward 
L. Duncan, John N. Grenfell, Jr., Woodie W. White 

Lay — Carl R. Ammennan, Irene Norris, Harold M. Karls, Freda 
Spafford, Mary Good, James Ragland, William C. Hitchock, Wil- 
liam E. Bright, Lionel Thompson 
East Ohio Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial— Robert W. Kelley, Robert J. Tolbert, Kenneth W. Hulit, 
Thomas L. Cromwell, Abraham L. Brandyberry, Robert H. 
Courtney, Forrest G. Nees, J. R. Nelson, Charles M. Dailey, Blake 
D. Wagner, Calvin R. Myers, Edwin P. Eberly, Paul 0. Mayer 

Lay — Mrs. Monroe Cooke, Thomas P. Moore, John Chittum, Francis 
M. Glasgow, Melvin Hayes, Francis Lang, Delmar T. O'Hara, 
Mrs. Clarence E. Achberger, Albert Robinson, Alfred B. Bonds, 
Leonard White, Merritt Clymer, Gene Boyer 
Eastern Pennsylvania Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — Mark J. Hostetter, F. Lewis Walley, Edwin L. Ellis, 
Henry W. Zehner, George W. Bashore, Henry H. Nichols, War- 
ren F. Mentzer, Thomas A. Buttimer 

Lay — Mrs. Ruth M. Daugherty, Carlton S. Dodge, Lawton W. 
Shroyer, John R. Harper, Harold H. Quickel, William C. Jason, 
Jr., Mrs. Reta S. Barto 

Lay Reserve — William G. Luff 
Florida Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — George A. Foster, Robert M. Blackburn, Eugene M. 
Zimmerman, Ralph B. Huston, Al A. Hedberg, Millard C. 
Cleveland, James L. Knox, John J. Rooks, W. Scott Bozeman, 
Walter B. Rutland, Walter N. Kalaf 

Lay — William A. Meadows, Richard V. Moore, Percy B. Revels, 
Olive E. Watson, O. B. Fanning, Ethel M. Gray, Robert T. Mann, 
Ray L. Redstone, William S. Hughlett, Alfred B. Blackburn, 
Mrs. H. V. Weems, Edd W. Gentry 

Ministerial Reserves — C. Durward McDonell, Hector Navas* 

Lay Reserve — Harry L. Burney, Jr. 
Georgia Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Anderson C. Epps 

Lay— T. R. Wilson 
Annual Conference of German Democratic Republic (OS) 



* Former E.U.B. Jurisdictional Reserve seated in place of a former E.U.B. prin- 
cipal delegate. 



The United Methodist Church 233 

Ministerial — Gerhard Havemann, Herbert Gotz 

Lay — Karl-Heinz Enke, Harry Schneidereit 
Gujarat Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Jayanand I. Chawhan 

Lay — Vinubhai W. Chitnis 
Holston Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Mack B. Stokes, Raymon E. White, Robert L. Wilcox, 
Edgar A. Eldridge, Robert F. Lundy, Wilmer B. Robbins, 
George E. Naff, James S. McCartt, Frank A. Settle 

Lay— John E. Steffner, Sr., Mrs. J. B. Ragsdale, Holiday Smith, 
John T. Lundy, Frank S. Wilson, L. T. Prigmore, L. D. Lusby, 
Carroll H. Long, Fred P. Entler 
Hyderabad Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — M. Elia Peter 

Lay — Maddala R. Vijendra Kumar 
Iowa Annual Coyiference (NC) 

Ministerial — M. Trevor Baskerville, Alferd E. Wilken, Frank A. 
Nichols, Wayne E. Shoemaker, C. Dendy Garrett, Lester L. 
Moore, Richard C. Pfaltzgraff, Paul M. Hann, Robert T. Dodder, 
Donald L. Carver, LeRoy W. Moore, Kenneth E. Metcalf, 
Lloyd A. Latta 

Lay — Maurice K, Long, Mrs. William H. Yaggy, Mrs. Edward E. 
Sears, William P. Applegate, Paul V. Shearer, Mrs. Robert Arm- 
strong, Phil Kerber, Carl W. Faust, Max W. Kreager, J. Jeffrey 
Hoover, Mrs. Paul Braun, Rainsford A. Brown, Dr. Clarence H. 
Mannasmith 
Kansas East Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — M. Max Wright, Clare J. Hayes, Don W. Holter, Rich- 
ard E. Johnson, Ewart G. Watts 

Lay — Floyd H. Coffman, John E. Stumbo, Mrs. Hilda Mcintosh, 
Mrs. Thelma Hines, T. Russell Reitz 
Kansas West Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — Clarence J. Borger, Bruce P. Blake, C. M. Fogleman, 
Jr., LeRoy A. Bott, Glenn E. Matthew, James H. Iwig 

Lay — Thomas Rupert, Harold Totten, Marjorie Matthaei, Paul W. 
Renich, Walter J. Hickerson, Tom Hartman 
Kentucky Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Albert W. Sweazy, Edward L. Tullis, Russell R. Pat- 
ton, Horace H. Green 

Lay — Cornelius R. Hager, Ray Litton, John Q. Kemper 

Lay Reserve — Robert G. Mayfield 
Liberia Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Samuel T. Roberts 

Lay Reserve — Joseph N. Togba 
Little Rock Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — C. Ray Hozendorf, George W. Martin, Robert E. L. 
Bearden 

Lay— Gordon B. Carlton, Mrs. E. T. Davenport, Carl C. Hall 
Louisiana Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — Benjamin R. Oliphint, W. T. Handy, Jr., Benedict A. 
Galloway, Jack Cooke, Robert F. Harrington, James L. Stovall 

Lay— Thomas H. Matheny, Mrs. Charles B. McGowan, Hubert M. 
Blanchard, William Davis Cotton, Allen L. Brown 

Lay Reserve — Cecil E. Bland 
Louisville Annual Conference {SE) 

Ministerial — Paul Shepherd, George S. Wood, William E. James, 
Allan H. L. Randolph 

Lay — Tom Jenkins, Mrs. Jane Arterburn, Dr. C. Kenneth Peters, 
Felix J. Sanders 



234 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Lucknow Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Christopher S. Dass 
Lay — Sophie Charan 
Madhya Pradesh Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Victor Peter 
Lay — Ashok K. Raoji 
Maine Annual Conference (NE) 
Ministerial— S. Blake Ellis 
Lay — Merrill A. Danforth 
Memphis Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — James A. Fisher, Sr., William P. Bailey, Jr., Frank L. 

McRae, Lloyd W. Ramer, Carl M. Robbins 
Lay — Joseph N. Pevahouse, Mrs. Wayne A. Lamb, R. H. Bond, 
Charles L. Yancey, Lloyd S. Adams, Jr. 
Middle Philippines Annual Conference (OS) 
Lay — Abigael C. Llenado 
Ministerial Reserve — Santos M. Adriano 
Mindanao Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Condrado G. Guiang 
Lay — Francisco A. Bibay, Jr. 
Minnesota Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial — Charles B. Purdham, Lyle T. Christiansen, Willard S. 

Allin, Delton H. Krueger, Merle A. Dunn, Stanley G. Hanks 

Lay — Wesley A. Melgren, Lyle J. Schreiber, John C. Espie, 

Kathleen L. Haining, Leonard L. Harkness 
Lay Reserve — Winfield Forsberg 
Mississippi (FCJ) Annual Conference (SE) 
Ministerial— Wendell P. C. Taylor 
Lay — Wayne F. Calbert 
Mississippi Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — John W. Leggett, Jr., George E. Jones, Robert M. 

Matheny, Frank E. Dement, Jr. 
Lay — John C. Satterfield, Bert Jordan, Edvi^in E. Moorhead, Mrs. 
Marshall Smith 
Missouri East Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — John N. Doggett, Jr., John C. Montgomery, Jr., Monk 

Bryan, John W. Ward, Jr. 
Lay — J. Clinton Haw^kins, Mrs. Ralph McCullough, Mrs. Ross Swof- 
ford, William F. Allison 
Missouri West Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — A. Sterling Ward, C. Jarrett Gray, Sr., Kenneth C. 
Johnston, Forrest L. Standard, Lyman Firestone, Sidney E. Davis 
Lay — Mrs. Beulah Gailey, Aubrey B. Speer, Kenneth A. McCall, 
Mrs. Betty Cagna, Mrs. Mary Hampton, Ralph Scott 
Moradabad Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Daniel B. Massey 
Lay — Christo D. Dayal 
Nebraska Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial— Alva H. Clark, John F. Wichelt, Kenneth W. Hicks, 

Emmett T. Streeter, Lowen V. Kruse, John H. Mikkelsen 
Lay — G. Alan Dunlap, Warren K. Urbom, Odin W. Poppe, John H. 
Frey, Mrs. E. L. Ferris, Mrs. Wayne W. Harrington 
New Hampshire Annual Conference (NE) 
Ministerial — William R. Keeffe 
Lay — Forest W. Laraba 
New Mexico Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — Bervin O. Caswell, Burnie C. Goodwin, Jr., Martin B. 

Stewart 
Lay— Randle Butler, Frank B. Ford, Sam Steele 



The United Methodist Church 235 

New York Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — William M. James, F. Herbert Skeete, Harold A. 
Bosley, John E. Carrington, Charles A. Barton, Richard S. 
Parker, Richard A. Thornburg, Douglas F. Verdin, Alfredo 
Cotto-Thorner 
Lay — Robert W. Preusch, Jeanette Winton, Howard H. Darling, 
William E. Brown, Gloster C. Current, Mabel E. Collins, William 
T. Staubach, Jr., George M. Northrop, Ramon Aponte 
North Alabama Amnml Conference (SE) 

Ministerial— R. Edwin Kimbrough, Allen D. Montgomery, Paul L. 
Clem, Robert C. Morgan, Thomas F. Stevenson, Barry H. Ander- 
son, Denson N. Franklin, Thomas A. Edgar 
Lay — George R. Hundley, Jesse A. Gulp, Edward Montgomery, W. 
Robert Lewis, Mrs. John W. Gordon, Burt Purdy, H. K. Barnes, 
A. H. Woodall 
North Arkansas Anriual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — Joel A. Cooper, Earl B. Carter, Myers B. Curtis, 

Charles P. McDonald 
Lay — Homer H. Fulbright, E. Clay Bumpers, Henry M. Rainwater, 
Matt L. Ellis 
North Carolina Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Nicholas W. Grant, William J. Neese, Charles H. 
Mercer, Joyce V. Early, Warren B. Petteway, Samuel L. Town- 
send, Robert E. Cushman, Chancie D, Barclift, Albert F. Fisher 
Lay — Mrs. Harold L. Mann, Walter F. Anderson, J. Nelson Gibson, 
Charles K. McAdams, L. Stacy Weaver, Mrs. Sam A. Dunn, 
Arnold K. King, Grier L. Garrick 
Lay Reserve — John M. Meares 
North Dakota Annual Conference (NC) 
Ministerial — David F. Knecht 
Lay — Robert Sundin 
North Georgia Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — William H. Ruff, T. Cecil Myers, Bevel Jones, Gordon 
G. Thompson, Jr., Frank H. Prince, Charles E. Wilson, Jr., 
Delma L. Hagood, Eugene T. Drinkard, Frank Moorhead 
Lay — David W. Brooks, Paul Webb, Jr., Mrs. R. M. McCommons, 
Joe B. Dekle, Mrs. Victor Yeargan, Mrs. Arthur Styron, James 
MacKay 
Lay Reserves — James L. Jackson, Robert J. Noland 
North India A7intial Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Cecil T. Richards 
Lay — Inder A. Shaw 
North Indiana Annual Conference {NC) 

Ministerial— A. Hunter Colpitts, Virgil V. Bjork, Merrell D. Geible, 
Verner A. Carlson, John D. Wolf, Gerald H. Jones, Alfred L. 
Keller, Donald F. LaSuer 
Lay — George Davis, Mrs. Robert L. Sites, Mrs. Roy Helms, Mrs. 
Wilbur D. Shown, Kermit Burrous, Forest R. Heyde, Gene E. 
Robbins, Mrs. Kermit Burrous, Mrs. A. Hunter Colpitts 
Ministerial Reserve — Donald F. McMahan 
North Katanga Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Maurice Ngoi 
Lay — Louise Werder 
North Mississippi Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Jamie G. Houston, E. A. Bailey, John D. Humphrey, 

Sr., William L. Wallace, Jr. 
Lay — Kirk Egger, George M. Yarbrough, Joe N. Bailey, Jr. 
Lay Reserve — William L. Sharp 
North Texas Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial— William E. Trice, Albert C. Outler, Zan W. Holmes, 



236 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Jr., Robert E. Goodrich, Jr., Ervin M. Gathings, Gordon D. 
Casad 

Lay — Leo L. Baker, Frank Greenhaw, J. Herschel Fisher, Avery 
Mays, Wilbur F. Roper, Martha B. Watson 
Northern Illinois Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial— Merlyn W. Northfelt, Charles S. Jarvis, Willie B. Clay, 
Richard D. Tholin, Edsel A. Ammons, William D. White, Samuel 
Batt, Carleton C. Rogers, Eugene E. Stauffer 

Lay^Merrill Gates, Walter Lennartson, John R. Van Sickle, Mrs. 
A. B. Pfeiffer, Mrs. Wesley S. Wieting, Mrs. Jack Oehler, Joseph 
T. Johnson, Herbert Walton, Mrs. C. C. Cummings 
Northern New Jersey Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — James M. Ault, Dean A. Lanning, Ralph L. Stephens 

Lay — Clair W. Black, Betty Lou Holland, Clarice Howe, Rose Rol- 
lins 

Ministerial Resei-ve — Eugene L. Stockwell 
Northern New York Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — Carlton G. Van Ornum, Allison C. Wood 

Lay — Charles F. Schoenlein, Vernon Lee 
Northoni Philippines Annual Conference {OS) 

Ministerial — Pablo M. Adduro 

Lay — Pedro F. Fabian 
Northtvest Germany Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Erich M. Baass, Fritz Harriefeld 

Lay — Werner E. Kuehl 

Lay Reserve — Reinhard A. Schalla 
Northwest Philippines Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Victor C. Vinluan 

Lay — Restituto F. Samson 
Northtvest Texas Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — Marvin L. Boyd, S. Duane Bruce, Charles E. Lutrick, 
Ted J. Dotts 

Lay— M. C. Ledbetter, Mrs. Cecil R. Matthews, Thomas K. Kim, 
Harold O. Harriger 
Norivay Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Arnold Madsen 

Lay — Hans Gausdal 
Oklahoma Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — Finis A. Crutchfield, G. Lemuel Fenn, William R. 
Henry, J. Chess Lovern, Lloyd A. Peters, Irving L. Smith, J. 
Clifton Sprouls, Wayne W. Coffin, W. Eugene Kay, R. Jack 
Featherston 

Lay — William C. Doenges, Jim A. Egan, S. Covey Page, Mrs. 
Floyd L. Silvers, Dolphus Whitten, Jr., Mrs. George V. Metzel, 
Robert R. Price, Manly M. Moore, Charles Codding, Jr., Ronald 
W. Gilbert 
Oregon-Idaho Annual Conference (W) 

Ministerial — Robert W. Burtner, H. James Jenkins, C. Gene Al- 
bertson 

Lay — Erwin H. Schwiebert, Mrs. Elizabeth Watson, Harold E. Rose 
Pacific Northwest Annual Conference (W) 

Ministerial— Jack M. Tuell, Melvin M. Finkbeiner, Joe A. Harding, 
Paul J. Beeman, George L. Poor 

Lay — Mrs. Norma Eby, James Dolliver, Marshall C. Hjelte, Her- 
man R. Praetorius, Mrs. Alvirita Little 
Peninsula Anyiual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial— R. Jervis Cooke, G. Wayne Cuff, Paul E. McCoy, Otho 
G. Brewer, Jr. 

Lay — A. Frank Chapman, Mrs. Orien Mangum, James C. Hard- 
castle, Maurice M. Hancock 



The United Methodist Church 237 

Philippines A7inual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Ignacio P. Bautista 

Lay — Abdon Mendigorin 
Poland Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Witold Benedyktowicz 

Lay — Adam Kleszcynski 
Piierto Rico Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — Benjamin Santana 

Lay — Ismael Cabrera 
Rhodesia Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Fannuel Kadenge 

Lay — William Marima 
Rio Grande Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial — Roy D. Barton 

Lay — Mike Avina 
Rocky Mountain Annual Conference (W) 

Ministerial— Harvey H. Potthoff, Paul H. Hagiya, William R. Per- 
sons, Ronald R. Hamilton, William O. Byrd 

Lay- — E. R. Naylor, Joe Ariki, Romane G. Moeller, Mrs. Virgil 
Anderson, Donald R. Wood 
Sierra Leoyie Anmial Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Alex J. Smith 

Lay — Richard E. S. Lagawo 
South Carolina {1866) Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Warren M. Jenkins 

Lay — James Mack 
South Carolina (1785) Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Eben Taylor, R, Wright Spears, C. LeGrande Moody, 
Jr., Phil M. Jones, A. McKay Brabham, Wallace Fridy, James 
Barrett, George W. Whitaker 

Lay — Harry R. Kent, Mrs. W. Roy Parker, J. E. Jerome, Lochlan L. 
Hyatt, Michael Watson, Parker Evatt, Joel C. Adkins, Spencer M. 
Rice 
South Dakota Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial — Richard Pittenger 

Lay — Ervin Ortman 
South Georgia Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — G. Ross Freeman, Frank L. Robertson, David A. Duck, 
Alvis A. Waite, Jr., W. R. Key, George L. Zorn 

Lay — George A. Wright, Mrs. J. R. Rivers, B. I. Thornton, George 
W. Mayo, Mrs. Carlton Carruth, Zach S. Henderson 
South Germany Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — Hermann Sticher, Dieter A. Sackmann 

Lay — Richard Jetter, Heinz P. Fischer 
South India Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — S. K. Samuel 

Lay^H. M. Devadanam 
South Indiana Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial — J. Kenneth Forbes, Leroy C. Hodapp, Richard E. 
Hamilton, Gene P. Crawford, Joe G. Emerson, Byron F. Stroh, 
George E. Rice, Charles F. Stanton, Robert W. Koenig 

Lay — -Mrs. Robert E. Green, Francis Wilcoxon, John J. Thomas, 
Clifford Bingham, Edward Susat, Mary Lee Bastain, Thomas 
Bryant, John Easley 

Lay Reserve — Russell Kibler 
Southeast Africa Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial Reserve — Alf G. Helgesson 

Lay Reserve — Chadreque J. Mujongue 
Southern California-Arizona Annual Conference (W) 

Ministerial— Melvin G. Talbert, F. Thomas Trotter, Richard W. 



238 Journal of the 1972 Geyieral Conference 

Cain, Thomas K. Farley, Peter F. Chen, Randall C. Phillips, 
Melvin E. Wheatley, Jr., N. Robert Kesler, Elias G. Galvan, 
Laverne H. Gustafson, Will M. Hildebrand, J. Irwin Trotter 
Lay — Pauline Bobbitt, Clifford B. Aguilar, David L. Myers, 
Georgia Harkness, Ralph C. Hook, Jr., Mildred Hutchinson, 
George F. Williams, Gordon Martin, Leon T. McKenzie, Kazuo 
Saito 
Lay Reserves — D. Leslie Hole, Ulysses S. Griggs, Sr, 
Southern Congo Anmml Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Elie M. Kaputo 
Lay — Paul Muteteke 
Southern Illinois Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial — R. Paul Sims, Donald L. Lowe, William B. Lewis, 

Robert R. Hollis 
Lay — Norman Fechtig, Everett K. Thompson, Marlene Cummins, 
David L. Stanley 
Southern New England Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial— Gilbert H. Caldwell, Jr., E. McKinnon White, C. Dale 

White, Wilbur C. Ziegler, Walter G. Muelder 
Lay— Harold F. Smith, Harry L. Johnson, II, Dight W. Grain, 

Stanley C. Weinberg, Jr. 
Lay Reserve — Mary Stewart 
Southern New Jersey Annual Confereiice (NE) 

Ministerial — Charles A. Sayre, Hooker D. Davis, Ernest W. Lee, 

Frank B. Stanger 
Lay — Leon E. Walker, Hammell P. Shipps, Edwin F. Hann, Jr., 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Brogdon 
Southwest Annual Conference (SC) 
Ministerial — W. D. Lester 
Lay — Alice Preston 
Southwest Germany Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Heinrich Michelmann 
Lay — Maria Wunderlich 
Ministerial Reserve — Werner Deiss 
Southwest Texas Annual Conference {SC) 

Ministerial — Ernest T. Dixon, Jack D. Heacock, George M. Ricker, 

J. Garfield Owens, Ted I. Richardson, Ralph H. Seller 
Lay — Tom Reavley, John T. King, James M. Walker, Mrs. Norris 
McMillan, Don J. Hand, Mrs. John Wilshusen 
Sweden Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Gunnar E. Larson 
Lay — Curt Amark 
Switzerland (M) Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial — Theophil J. Tobler 
Lay— Theophil H. Gsell 
Sivitzerland (E) Annual Conference (OS) 
Ministerial— Theo Geissbiihler 
Lay— Siegfried Stich 
Tennessee Annual Conference {SE) 

Ministerial — William H. Tomlin, John G. Corry, Robert H. Spain, 

H. Thornton Fowler, John R. Allison 
Lay — Floyd Ford, Mrs. William T. Roberts, D. Roscoe Buttrey 
Lay Reserves — Mrs. Frank A. Calhoun, Mrs. Ellen Rosser 
Texas Annual Conference (SC) 

Ministerial— John W. Hardt, Wayne H. McCleskey, Willie B. Ran- 
dolph, Carlos W. Davis, J. Kenneth Shamblin, M. Keith Kellow, 
Harold Fagan, Allen M. Mayes, Wallace T. Shook, Elza L. Love 
Lay — Ray W. Goens, Don L. Strickland, Woodrow Seals, L. A. 
Humphrey, Jr., H. David Pope, Jr., Mrs. C. Morton, Sam C. 



The United Methodist Church 239 

Bramlett, Mrs. Lamar Clark, Mrs. E. Moore Decker, James R. 

Paxton 
Troy Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — Leon M. Adkins, Jr., Luther A. Patton, Arthur R. 

Melius, Royal B. Fishbeck, Jr. 
Lay — Mrs. Selma Ogden, Earle N. Cooper, Frederick K. Kirchner, 

Donald A. Waterfield 
Upper Mississipjn Annual Conference {SE) 
Ministerial — John H. Graham 
Lay — L P. Presley 
Virginia Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — Carl J. Sanders, Paul D. Martin, Jr., Carl H. Douglass, 

Jr., Harold H. Fink, Roland P. Riddick, M. Douglas Newman, 

Harry B. Eaton, Godfrey L. Tate, George S. Lightner, Floyd L. 

Fulk, Joseph T. Carson, Jr., James W. Turner, R. Kern Eutsler, 

Robert P. Parker 
Lay— Jerry G. Bray, A. G. Jefferson, W. Roland Walker, John H. 

Rixse, Jr., William C. Vaughan, John B. Russell, William T. 

Robey, Jr., Harold B. Kellam, John C. Linhoss, Luther W. White, 

III, Thomas P. Tignor, Mrs. Harry E. Born, John C. Simpson, 

Jr., Mrs. Paul Hartz, Mrs. James Allen 
Ministerial Reserve — Carlton P. Minnick 
West Berlin Annual Conference (OS) 

Ministerial — D. D. Herbert Eckstein, Herbert Manns 
Lay — Martin Doering, Lydia Meinhardt 
West Michigan Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial — Lawrence R. Taylor, Charlos C. Page, Alden B. Burns, 

James W. Wright, Keith L Pohl 
Lay — Katherine W. Wilcox, Mrs. Harold Newman, Arden M. Peter- 
son, John Babcock, Donald E. Holbrook 
West Ohio Annual Conference {NC) 

Ministerial — William K. Messmer, Paul E. Stuckey, Robert A. 

Byler, Joseph A. Graham, Granville N. Hardin, Calvin 

Rodeheffer, Sumpter M. Riley, Jr., Emerson S. Colaw, James E. 

Flinchbaugh, Glenn H. Biddle, Paul D. Chiles, Paul M. Vande- 

griff, John K. Bergland, Donald R. Yocom, Walter R. Dickhaut, 

Sr., John F. Osborn, Harold Dutt, Raoul C. Calkins 
Lay — Darrell Hottle, Leonard D. Slutz, Dale F. DeLong, Kenneth 

W. Hunt, Donald Hawkins, Harold L. Boda, Mrs. James M. 

Leonard, Eldred B. Heisel, Darrell Detty, Paul B. Momberg, 

Edgar Cochrun, Sarah Cox, Mrs. Henry Henderson, Ben Richer, 

Charles H. Weston, George Gilts, Joseph W. Fichter 
Lay Reserve — Torrey A. Kaatz 
West Virginia Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — Ramsey Bridges, Robert E. Dille, Claude R. Collins, 

Henry R. High, Harry Coleman, Denver L. Miles, Melvin S. 

Risinger, Marvin H. Carr, Truman W. Potter 
Lay — Roy E. Blessing, Mrs. Richard Hoffman, Damon L. Engel, 

Mrs. Frank B. Everhart, Mrs. Floyd Rogers, Miles Stanley, Mrs. 

Jean Paige, D. W. Froe 
Lay Reserve — Mrs. Ethel Belk 
Westejm New York Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — Sherman B. Eckel, Richard W. Harrington, Edmund 

A. W. Millet, Donald E. Modisher 
Lay — George W. Cooke, Elizabeth B. Gundlach, Mrs. Rosalind M, 

Lesher, Arthur S. Merrow 
Western North Carolina Annual Conference (SE) 

Ministerial — James C. Peters, Jerry D. Murray, Charles D. White, 

Wilson O. Weldon, R. Herman Nicholson, Julian A. Lindsey, H. 



240 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Claude Young, J. Clay Madison, Philip L. Shore, Jr., Joseph B. 

Bethea, Cecil L. Heckard, Robert T. Young 
Lay — Mrs. Mary E. King, Mrs. Lurleen G. Barnhardt, William R. 

Henderson, Mrs. Viola Redding, Wesley Bailey, Carl B. Hyatt, 

R. Powell Majors, Isaac H. Miller, Robin P. Hood, Mrs. Mary 

Morrison, Edwin C. Ford 
Lay Reserve — Robert M. Smith 
Western Penyisylvania Ayimml Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — John B. Warman, Kenneth P. Rutter, James A. 

Woomer, Harold V. Lindquist, William B. Grove, Harry J. Fisher, 

Paul J. Meuschke, H. Donald Lash, Gene E. Sease, James L. 

Carraway, Paul M. Easter, Robert C. Howe 
Lay — Mrs. Thomas DeVaux, Franklin Blackstone, Jr., William M. 

Beatty, Raymond M. Bell, Dwight M. Bittner, Paul Chaffee, Joyce 

Anderegg, Herbert L. Gwyer, Mrs. James S. Cain, Clara 

Cockerill 
Lay Reserves — Mrs. Bernice B. Bishop, James L. Donner 
Wisconsin Annual Conference (NC) 

Ministerial — Marvin A. Schilling, Gordon R. Bender, M. Stanford 

Strosahl, Richard 0. Truitt, Willard W. Schulz, Alvin J. 

Lindgren, Winslow Wilson 
Lay — Leigh Roberts, Clifford Lau, Mrs. Sharon Mielke, Mrs. 

Patricia A. Soderholm, Donald Wilkinson, Mrs. Frances Hundley 
Lay Reserve — Mrs. Delia Sprecher 
Wyoming Annual Conference (NE) 

Ministerial — Edgar F. Singer, George R. Akers, Philip N. Pitcher 
Lay — Harry M. Gordon, Mrs. Edgar J. Lashford, William L. Beebe 
Yellowstone Annual Conference ( W) 
Ministerial — John C. Soderberg 
Lay — Esther Hood 
The Methodist Church of Great Britain (OS) 
Ministerial — Eric W. Baker 
Lay— John W. Kellaway, Pauline M. Webb 
Ministerial Reserve — W. N. Charles Wooldridge 

Provisional Annual Conferences 

Austria Provisional Annual Conference 

Ministerial — Robert F. Gebhart 
Hong Kong Provisional Annual Conference 

Ministerial — Lincoln Leung 
North Africa Provisional Annual Conference 

Ministerial — Miss Liv Larsen 
Taiwan Provisional Annual Conference 

Ministerial — J. C. Wong 

Affiliated Autonomous Churches 

Methodist Church of Argentina 

Ministerial — Enrique A. Lavigne 

Lay Reserve — Dr. Hector Lombardo 
Methodist Church of Bolivia 

Ministerial — Jorge Pantelis 

Lay Reserve — Jaime Ampuero 
Methodist Church of Indonesia 

Ministerial — E. M. Hutasoit 

Lay — F. Hutagalung 
Korean Methodist Church 

Lay — Mrs. Sun Hi Lee Ro, Dr. Eui Sun Lim 

Ministerial Reserve — Carl Judy 



The United Methodist Church 241 

Methodist Church of Malaya-Singapore 
Ministerial — C. N. Fang 
Lay— S. T. Peter Lim 

Affiliated United Churches 

Protestant Church of Belgium 

Ministerial — Andre J. Pieters 

Lay — Mrs. Ruth Fraisse Lheureuz 
Church of Christ in China 

Ministerial — Peter Wong 

Lay— Chan Woh Tung 
Doviinicayi Evangelical Church 

Ministerial — Raul Blondet 
United Evangelical Church of Ecuador 

Ministerial — Rene Tufino 

Lay — Sergio Villalba 
United Church of Christ in Japan 

Ministerial — George Hanabusa, R. Wallace Brownies 

Lay — Shiro Abe, Ritsuko Sakurai 

Other Non-voting Delegates 

Alaska Mission {W) 

Ministerial — David K. Fison 

Lay — -Mrs. Jean Stassel 
Oklahoma Indian Mission (SC) 

Ministerial — Thomas Roughface 

Lay — Mrs. Minnie Toahty 
Red Bird Mission (SE) 

Ministerial — John W. Bischoff 
Youth Representatives 

David Bayle, Curt Danforth, Leslie Evans, Thomas M. Hamilton, 

Annette Hutchins, Scott Jones, David B. Miller, LaVeeda Morgan, 

Gregory V. Palmer, Wanda Walls 

Quorum 

Bishop Hardin: I nov^r raise the queston of the presence of a 
quorum. Mr. Secretary. 

Dr. J. Wesley Hole: At the close of registration last night 855 
delegates had registered. This being 85.5% of the 1,000 elected dele- 
gates, I hereby certify that a quorum as required by disciplinary Par. 
608 is present. 

Greetings 

Bishop Hardin: Thank you, sir. I recognize Bishop J, Ow^en Smith, 
host Bishop of the Atlanta area. 

Bishop J. Owen Smith: Bishop Hardin, members of the General 
Conference and friends and visitors: We do welcome you here. I 
remember that I had the privilege at the Dallas Conference of inviting 
you to come the Atlanta way and then the privilege of reminding you 
at St. Louis that you were to come the Atlanta way, and we were 
looking for you; and now time has passed and you are here. We are 
delighted that you have come to Atlanta, and we welcome you with 
all our hearts. 

There is an old story about a college student who came home from 
college and purchased a painter's kit and made a trip to the mountains 
to paint. He had a variety of brushes and a variety of colors. He 
located himself on the top of a hill and painted a lovely sunset, made 



242 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

his way down the rivulet a little bit and painted some lovely flowers, 
and finally in his journey he came up on an old gentleman sitting on 
the porch that he thought was a rather typical creature of life back 
in the mountains, and he wanted to paint him. 

So he said, "Uncle, I'd like to paint you." He said, "No, sonny, I'm 
not going to let you paint me." "Well," he said, "I'll give you $5 to let 
me paint you." "No, no, I'm not going to let you paint me." "Well, 
I'll give you $10 to let me paint you." And he said, "No, sonny, it 
isn't the money, but the thing that bothered me, sir, was how I'd get 
that paint 'offen' me." 

Well, you perhaps brought a brush, and we have a brush, and we 
both shall be painting; and it's just quite possible that something will 
rub off on both of us, or all of us, that will be a sort of a bit of enamel 
for not only now but throughout eternity. We welcome you as individ- 
uals, as people, as Christian friends. And this is, I think, our fellow- 
ship together, person to person, will mean a lot. Likewise, I think in 
and around Atlanta you might find in the next few days very lovely 
setting in the world of nature. The azaleas have faded a bit, but the 
dogwood perhaps is at its peak. You'll have opportunities to see some 
of these lovely settings of nature. For some of you, at least, that will 
rub off on you, and we welcome you to take a look at it; and if you 
will take notice of the fact in a minute, you will find that you literally 
are now in a section of our United Methodist Church that's pretty 
active. 

This is an active section in the name of Christ through The United 
Methodist Church. We like to think that our association together 
would be strengthening here, and we welcome you. With what you 
bring to our pulpits and discussion groups and your influence upon 
this community perhaps we can help each other, and so, we welcome 
you as Christian friends and likewise as individuals as we meet here 
and there. But we also welcome you as delegates to the General 
Conference of The United Methodist Church. This, it seems to me, is 
the most important after all. I have come to feel over a period of 
years that perhaps this constitutes the finest lawmaking body in the 
world — a group of ministers elected by the ministers, a group of lay- 
men elected by the laymen. This by no stretch of the imagination can 
be a commonplace group, and we like to remember that this great 
group in here is here in the Atlanta area. 

Occasionally we get together in Georgia as official groups. Some- 
times the Cabinets take a look at it, sometimes there are other groups, 
the Program Council; and we raise the question, "Really, what's 
wrong with the church; what's right with the church?" Well, that's 
always a big subject, but we always come out thinking that there is 
an awfully lot much more that's good with the church than there is 
that's bad with the church. 

Matter of fact, I've never known a time in history while I have 
lived or read about where I have known more lovely people trying 
awfully hard to do something in the name of Christ for the problems 
in society. So we always come out thinking there is a lot right with it, 
but I remember recently these two things, and I'll leave them with 
you, and maybe certainly this General Conference would like to do 
something about it. I can remember that we decided that we are trying 
awfully hard to save the church now, rather than give it some air in 
which to grow and be, and dare to be the church. I think that is 
happening. 

I think our experience and technology and technological discoveries 
have about led us to believe we can do anything we want to ourselves 
without much help from anywhere else, and we are just out to save 
this church. So we felt like, really, that's not quite our mission. If 
you give this church air to breathe, a place to run, and let the church 



The United Methodist Church 243 

be the church, it perhaps is the next turn around the corner. Then 
we wondered in this day if our Christ hasn't shrunk a bit. We've 
shrunken, not Christ. 

Perhaps one of the most meaningful things at Christmas time is 
Herod trying to kill the baby Jesus so he won't grow up and cause 
some trouble. They did that in those days. I think we are somewhere 
close to that. We would not hurt a hair of him, but we just wouldn't 
let him grow up. I wish this great General Conference could get hold 
of that and not pull this Christ down to our size, but lift up to the 
greatness and the bigness of our Lord and Master. Well, you've got 
a great opportunity for this kind of thing. The people called Meth- 
odists seem to me to have a special mission at this point. I'd like to 
close this word of welcome with a line that I received just a few 
days ago from a doctor friend here in this town. I really haven't 
seen him in months. I thought it was a little unusual that he would 
write me. 

Dr. Funk is one of the great orthopedic surgeons of the world. His 
office is here in Atlanta. Not only a great physician, but a great 
statesman, and a great churchman, some years ago had a tremendous 
sadness in his home and lost a very lovely son by drowning. No 
bitterness, though. He rededicated himself in honor of his own son. 
And around this world, this doctor practically every year goes to 
the mission field and operates, and operates, and operates and well, 
he is a great fellow. And he wrote me a letter and I want to quote 
from it just these lines: 

"Dear Bishop Smith: As the week of General Conference ap- 
proaches in Atlanta, there has been concern on the part of some 
members of the church that some may take offense at what perhaps 
may be considered the liberal, radical, or inflammatory speeches by 
some of the delegates. Though many of us may fail to agree wit'i 
what will doubtless be diverse groups with diverse points of view, I 
feel that we should take hope from the fact that ours is not a com- 
fortable church." I like that. 

"I feel that we should take hope from the fact that ours is not a 
comfortable church. We laymen of The United Methodist Church are 
happy and proud that Atlanta has been chosen as the site of this 
historic meeting. Sincerely yours, James Funk." 

So I bring you a message from the laymen and from the ministry, 
and we in this local community join hands with you who come from 
elsewhere, eighty-nine different countries of the world, to make this 
historic session, yes, but this very meaningful session in the history 
of our church, the greatest session ever held in Methodism for the 
on-going and the forward leap of the church of Christ. Blessings on 
you now and always. Thank you very much. 

Bishop Hardin: I'm sure that you would want the chair to respond 
very briefly to this word of welcome, to respond in behalf of all of 
us. It is no small thing to entertain the General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church. 

In recent times I have not seen many cities falling over themselves 
getting into line to extend an invitation to hold this conference within 
the confines of those cities. Therefore, we express to Atlanta, a great 
city, and to Georgians in general, a great people, our deep apprecia- 
tion not only of the invitation which was extended some time ago, 
but also for the very gracious and very warm reception and the very 
courteous manner in which we have been, and are being received in 
the city of Atlanta. Thank you. 

Bishop Hardin called for the report of the Commission 
on Entertainment and Program. 



244 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Commission on Entertainment and Program (see page 779) 

Mr. A. G. Jefferson (Virginia) : Bishop Hardin and members of 
the General Conference: You found on your desk this morning three 
issues of the Daily Christian Advocate. Near the top on the right 
hand side you found one marked 1-A, another 1-B, and another 1-C. 
The Report of the Commission on Entertainment and Program is 
found in section B on page 63. I shall not read the entire report, 
but simply lift out those parts of the report that require conference 
action. 

The first column and down through the second column to the bottom 
paragraph gives you a brief resume of some of the duties and respon- 
sibilities assigned to the Commission on Entertainment and Program 
by this General Conference. Beginning at the bottom of the second 
column, the last paragraph in that column, we have something here 
that we need conference action on. 

At the 1970 Special Session, authorization was voted by the con- 
ference to seat one minister and one layman from the Oklahoma 
Indian Mission, but without vote. 

A proposal was made in the calendar report number 254 to continue 
this policy in the ... in future General Conference. The report was 
one of many calendar reports which had not been considered when 
the Special Session was adjourned. Believing that it was the desire 
of the General Conference to continue the policy of seating the rep- 
resentatives of the Oklahoma Indian Mission without vote, the Com- 
mission has arranged for this to be done for the 1972 session. 

Concurrence of the General Conference with this action is re- 
quested. Shall I continue, Bishop, or do you want to take a vote? 

Bishop Hardin: No, I want to ask, do I hear a motion? Is there a 
second? 

Leonard D. Slutz (West Ohio) : I call your attention that in the 
report of the Commission on Religion and Race we covered this 
same matter, but at the same time we pointed out that there are 
two other missions which have not been represented, and we are 
asking that they also be included in this action, and as a matter of 
courtesy be permitted to seat one clergy and one lay delegate with 
the right to voice, but not vote. 

I point out particularly that the Red Bird Mission was customarily 
permitted to elect delegates to the General Conference of the Evangel- 
ical United Brethren Church, but that was not carried over into our 
present legislation. I also ask that the privilege be extended to the 
Alaska Mission so that these groups can have some voice, some rep- 
resentation in the General Conference. 

Bis/top Hardin: Mr. Slutz, may I ask if that was the same motion 
that Brother Woodie White intended to make? 

Mr. Slutz: Bishop, that is correct. 

Bisfiop Hardin: All right. Now, is it the will of the body that these 
three groups be included in the single motion? Yes, sir, Microphone 
4, please. Name and conference. 

Representation for Youth and Seminarians 

George A. Wriglit (South Georgia) : I believe the youth had ten 
representatives without vote at the St. Louis Conference, and I won- 
dered if they should be included with this group. 

Bisliop Hardin: Are you making a motion or are you just wondering 
sir? 

Mr. Wright: Well, I so move, sir. 



The United Methodist Church 245 

Bishop Hardin asked if there was a motion that would 
include representation with voice but without vote for both 
the three missions and the youth. 

Richard D. Tholin (Northern Illinois) : I would like to add to this 
that there are seminarians here representing the several seminaries 
of the church, and there is a request that two seminarians from each 
United Methodist seminary be given, seated with rights but not vote. 
I would like to include that. 

Bishop Hardin then suggested that the question of rep- 
resentation for the three missions be considered separately. 
A motion to grant representation as had been proposed for 
the Oklahoma Indian Mission, the Alaska Mission, and the 
Red Bird Mission was approved. 

Bishop Hardin then called for a vote on the motion made 
by George A. Wright (South Georgia) that ten youth rep- 
resentatives be seated with voice but without vote. The 
motion was approved. 

Bishop Hardin asked for a motion on the question of seat- 
ing the seminarians. George Williams (Southern California- 
Arizona) asked how the ten youth were to be elected. Mr. 
Wright (South Georgia) stated that it was his understand- 
ing that they would be nominated and selected by the youth 
caucus present at the General Conference from the national 
youth group. 

Melvin Brawn (California-Nevada) : I move that these youth be 
elected, two from each jurisdiction, comprising the ten. 

Mr. Wright (South Georgia) accepted Mr. Brawn's mo- 
tion as an amendment to the main motion. Truman W. Pot- 
ter (West Virginia) asked that a youth who had been 
elected by the West Virginia Conference but denied a seat 
in the General Conference because of his age be included as 
one of the youth representatives. Bishop Hardin stated that 
would require a vote of the body. Wendell P. Taylor (Mis- 
sissippi-FCJ) moved to amend the main motion to provide 
that the youth delegation include at least ten percent blacks. 
Mr. Wright (South Georgia) accepted the amendment as 
a part of the main motion. Joe A. Harding (Pacific North- 
west) offered a substitute for the main motion, providing 
that the youth be allowed to select their delegates without 
restriction. The motion to substitute was approved; Mr. 
Harding's motion thereby became the main motion, and it 
was approved. 

Motion 

Richard Tholin (Northern Illinois) : Mr. Chairman, I would like to 
move that two seminary students from each United Methodist Semi- 
nary be seated with voice but not vote, to be selected by student 



246 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

representatives of the several seminaries here at General Conference. 
If there is a second, I would like to speak to it just briefly. 

Bishop Hardin: Is it seconded? I don't hear a second yet. All right, 
it's seconded. 

Mr. Tholin: There are student groups of about five seminary stu- 
dents selected by their student bodies to be here at the General 
Conference. If we were to seat two from each of these delegations, 
they are duly representative of those student bodies and I think would 
be the best ones to handle it. 

Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) moved that this be 
referred to the Credentials Committee and spoke for his 
motion. The motion to refer was approved. 

Commission on Entertainment and Program Report Re- 
sumed 

A. G. Jefferson (Virginia) : I am not the Secretary of the General 
Conference but I would like to remind you that the rules require that 
we have a written or that he as a written record of each motion. 
Now beginning at the first complete paragraph, rather third column 
of page 63. We recommend that the seating plan as printed in the 
Daily Christwn Advocate of this date be approved as the official 
seating plan of this Conference. We further recommend that our 
Commission be authorized to make, from time to time, such changes 
as may be found necessary. 

Bishop Hardin: Do you move the adoption? 

Mr. Jefferson: I move the adoption, Bishop, yes. 

Bishop Hardin: Is it seconded? Any discussion. If you will approve, 
show the hands. Opposed by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Jefferson: Just as a matter of information because some of you 
will not read it, in the middle of that next paragraph you see that 
the schedule of the meeting places is printed on pages 6 and 7 of the 
Handbook. Then down to number 5 near the bottom of that column 
several changes as compared to the past have been made concerning 
tl;e Daily Christian Advocate. The increasing cost of furnishing the 
Daily Christian Advocate to the delegates has been a source of con- 
cern to your Commission. A careful study of this problem by a 
special committee has resulted in the following decisions: (a) only 
one copy of the DCA will ba furnished free of charge to each delegate 
rather than two as heretofore; (b) the size of the DCA will be re- 
duced to 8V2 X 11 inches; (c) a less expensive paper stock will be 
used; (d) devotional addresses and sermons will be omitted from the 
DCA. These changes will result in a sizeable savings in the cost, 
and the Conference is requested to approve the action of the Commis- 
sion making these changes. I move the approval. 

Bishop Hardin: Is there a second? Is there a second? Any discus- 
sion? If you will approve the changes, show the hand. Opposed by 
"the same sign. They are approved. 

Mr. Jefferson: Then, in case you might not read this next para- 
graph, may I just call it to your attention. We're pleased to report 
rpon nomination of Mr. John Procter, Publisher, the Commission has 
again elected Dr. Ewing Wayland as editor of the Daily Christian 
Advocate. This will be the fifth General Conference for which Dr. 
Wayland has ssrved in this capacity. 

We're also grateful to the Methodist Publishing House, and I think 
you delegates could join in this, for the providing the Hymnals for 
the delegates without cost to the Conference. I merely call that to 



The United Methodist Church 247 

your attention. Down near the bottom of the first column in page 64, 
Item 8 : 

"We have made provisions for conveniently located press tables, 
and we recommend that representatives of the press, as designated 
from time to time by the Commission on Public Relations and United 
Methodist Information, be seated at these tables, with admission 
to the floor by official press badges." 

I move adoption, or approval, of that. Bishop. 

Bishop Hardin: Second? If you will approve, show the hand. Op- 
posed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Jefferson: Item 9: 

"We recommend that active and retired members of the Judicial 
Council be seated upon the platform during all business sessions of 
the Conference." 

We move the approval of that recommendation. 

Bishop Hardin: Second? Somebody's bashful about seconding. 
Thank you. If you will approve, show the hand. Opposed, by the 
same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Jefferson: Item 10: 

"We recommend that the Communion offering be the only offering 
taken, and after consultation with the Council of Bishops, we recom- 
mend that the proceeds of the offering be turned over to the United 
Methodist Committee on Overseas Relief." 

I move the adoption of that. 

Bishop Hardin: Is there a second? If you will approve, show the 
hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Jefferson: Item 12, near the top of the second column: 

"Your Commission recommends a per diem allowance of $20 for 
each delegate for the days said delegate is in attendance at the ses- 
sions of the Conference." 

We move that adoption, Bishop. 

Bishop Hardin: Second? If you will approve, show the hand. Op- 
posed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Jefferson: Then, in Item 14: 

"In order to provide for the convenience of certain persons who 
will not be present during the entire session of the General Con- 
ference, but who have been invited as a matter of privilege for the 
Conference, and in order to facilitate their presentation to the Con- 
ference, your Commission recommends the following Orders of the 
Day: 

a. Greetings from the Mayor of the city of Atlanta, Sam Massell — 
Wednesday, April 19, 9:30 A.M. 

b. Fraternal Delegates — Wednesday, April 19, 10:30 A.M. 

c. Greetings from the Governor of the state of Georgia, Jimmy 
Carter— Wednesday, April 26, 9:30 A.M. 

"All other requests for Orders of the Day are referred to the 
Committee on Agenda as required by the Rules." 

We move these three Orders of the Day. 

Bishop Hardin: Is there a second? If you will approve, show the 
hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Jefferson: Near the bottom of that column, under Item b.: 

"On Wednesday evening, April 19, World Methodist Night will be 
observed in the theater of the Civic Center. In a dramatic program, 
representatives of the World Methodist Council, Affiliated Autono- 
mous Methodist Churches and other indigenous groups related to 
our Church will be presented. In view of this program, it is our 
intent that the General Conference will not hear individual reports 
of the groups represented in the program and that the General Con- 



248 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

ference sessions will not need to be interspersed with introductions, 
presentations, etc., of such representatives. We recommend this to 
be an official session of the General Conference." 

I move that. Bishop. 

Bishop Hardin: Is there a second. If you approve, show the hand. 
Opposed by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Jefferson: Then at the top of the page of, next page 65, of the 
first column, item b there, is not for Conference action, but there 
is a rather unusual situation here that I would like to call to your 
attention. This has to do with election of the delegates from the 
United Brethren Church, and also from the former Methodist, and 
keeping them in the proper perspective of 13% for one and 87 for 
the other. 

The bottom, near the bottom of that paragraph b, just above the 
letter c there, "As a result of this division 130 of 1,000 delegates, 
elected by the Annual Conferences of former EUB members and 866 
of the former Methodist members, the other 4 to make the grand total 
of 1,000 are from the Methodist Church of Great Britain." I call 
your attention to this because this is the first time that voting dele- 
gates have been elected from the Church in Great Britain, and I 
think it is worthy of our notation. 

Then in conclusion at the bottom of the next column, the middle 
column, "The scope of the foregoing report is an indication of the 
vast amount of work that has been done by many people in prepara- 
tion of the 1972 session of the General Conference. It is an impossi- 
bility to adequately thank all who have shared in the responsibilities 
of planning and arranging all the details involved. While we will 
recognize some during the session, we note that many who should 
be recognized will not be. As a Commission we want to record our 
gratitude to the large number of men and women, who, without whose 
faithful help this Conference could not be possible." And that is signed 
by the Chairman and Secretary of the Commission on Entertainment 
and Program, and I thank you, Bishop. 

Bishop Hardin: Thank you, Mr. Jefferson, for an excellent report, 
excellently made. Thank you very much. 

Motion to Amend Report 

Raoul C. Calkins (West Ohio) : I would like to make an amendment 
to the repoi't of the Commission on Entertainment and Program. Item 
number 2, on page 63. The amendment is this : "That the Commission 
on Entertainment and Program be requested to reconsider the propos- 
al that the 1976 General Conference meet in Portland and if possible, 
the 1976 General Conference be held closer to the center of the United 
Methodist population, and further, that all boards and agencies give 
special attention to holding meetings in such locations so that there 
will be a minimum of travel and entertainment expense. 

The motion to amend was seconded, and Dr. Calkins 
spoke in favor of it. Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) 
spoke against it. Robert W. Burtner (Oregon-Idaho) stated 
that the invitation still stood. The motion was defeated. 

Gilbert H. Caldivell, Jr. (Southern New England) moved 
that a report from Black Methodists for Church Renewal 
be made an order of the day at 11 :25 a.m. The motion was 
defeated. 

Paul A. Duffey (Alabama- West Florida) asked the con- 



The United Methodist Church 249 

ference to grant the Angola delegation the privilege of 
having Zachariah Cardozo, an interpreter, seated with 
them. The Chair asked that this matter be held in abeyance 
pending a motion to approve the report of the Commission 
on Entertainment and Program as a whole. 

E. McKinnon White (Southern New England) stated that 
there was some uncertainty about the chair's ruling that 
Mr. Caldwell's motion had been defeated. Bishop Hardin 
asked for another show of hands and ruled that the motion 
was defeated. 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) asked whether an offering would 
be taken for the ushers and pages. A. G. Jefferson stated 
that the Commission on Entertainment and Program was 
not recommending such an offering. Mr. Moore moved to 
amend the report of the Commission to provide that an of- 
fering for the ushers and pages be received at an appro- 
priate time designated by the Commission. Mr. Jefferson 
explained the Commission's position, Floyd H. Coffman 
(Kansas East) asked how much was being paid the ushers 
and pages. Mr. Jefferson referred the question to Dr. Nor- 
man Conard, General Conference Business Manager, who 
stated they were paid one dollar per day. 

Wilbur C. Ziegler (Southern New England) asked Mr. 
Jefferson if there had been any understanding between the 
Commission and Black Methodists for Church Renewal re- 
garding a time on the agenda. Marshall C. Hjelte (Pacific 
Northwest) raised a point of order. 

Bishop Hardin called for a vote on the amendment of- 
fered by Mr. Moore, and the amendment was adopted. 

Regarding Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Bishop 
Hardin stated the understanding of the chair that this was 
not an order of the day, but that he w^ould recognize the 
group for a presentation just prior to adjournment at noon. 

Bishop Hardin called for a vote on the report of the 
Commission on Entertainment and Program as a whole, 
and it was adopted. 

Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 

Bishop Hardin recognized John D. Herr (Eastern Penn- 
sylvania) for the report of the Committee on Plan of Orga- 
nization and Rules of Order. J. Wesley Hole (General 
Conference Secretary) called attention to Rule 15 and asked 
that all motions and amendments be submitted to the secre- 
tary's table in writing. 

Mr. Herr: Thank you. Bishop, the Committee on Plan of Organiza- 
tion and Rules of Order is the interim committee. We are to receive 
proposals to change the Plan of Organization and Rules and received 
quite a number of suggestions, are reported as given in the Daily 
Christian Advocate on page 49, that's IB, and would you turn to the 
Handbook, page 217, Plan of Organization — begins on page 217 and 



250 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

then the rules are on 232. You can follow this report on page 49, that 
is IB if you keep those two documents before you. 

Our interim report is three parts, as you see on page 49. There 
were certain editorial corrections which were posted by the Secretary, 
approved by the interim committee. There were certain items which 
need immediate action, and that's the reason the Bishops said they 
couldn't have an election of a Secretary until this report was given; 
and then are items which can receive later consideration, and those 
items you referred to the new committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order. 

Now the first part, the editorial corrections do not contain any 
substantive changes at all. They are purely editorial corrections and 
the Committee hopes that you will adopt them. If there are any 
questions, I think that either I or Dr. Hole can answer them but 
they are editorial in nature. 

Bishop Hardin: Are there any questions? Are you ready to accept 
the report. If you will do so, show the hands. Opposed by the same 
sign. It is accepted. 

Mr. Herr: Then we come to Part 2, following that items for im- 
mediate action. No. 1, the Hayidhook, page 217 calls for reserve 
delegates to be seated in place of the principal delegates in order 
of election, but in view of Judicial Council ruling 333, we recommend 
that Rule lA, 2c be suspended by this Conference for the duration of 
the Conference. 

Bishop Hardin: You heard the motion of the recommendation. If 
you approve, show the hand. Opposed by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Herr: The Commission on Entertainment and Program made 
a great many helpful suggestions, and one of them was to call atten- 
tion to the fact that the rule on page 223 which shows how a substitute 
is to be seated for principal delegate had not been followed in the 
last several Conferences, and so it is recommended that the wording 
be substituted. Now this is not only a substitution but is a simplifica- 
tion of the whole process. I think I had better read it, Bishop, because 
the Chairman of the various delegations need to follow this. 

Mr. Herr read the proposed substitution for Plan of 
Organization VI. A. 5 (see page 185). Bishop Hardin 
called for a vote on the proposed substitute, and it was 
adopted. 

Mr. Herr: Now the point 3, and this relates to point 3 and 4, are 
given to you in order that the business . . . the Committee work be 
done expeditiously. The first is the change in title from the Committee 
on Presentation of Reports to the Committee on Calendar and then 
the rewording of the Handbook, VI, A2. 

Mr. Herr read the proposed substitution for Plan of 
Organization VI. A. 2 (see page 184). Bishop Hardin 
called for a vote on the proposed substitute, and it was 
adopted. 

Mr. Herr: Now, the changes in the rules relating to the Legislative 
Committee. Turn to page 219. This first point which we come to under 
rule IV, it has to do with secretarial staff"; it would follow the first 
paragraph. This is new. The Conference shall elect upon nomination 
of the secretary, a Coordinator of Calendar, who shall assist the 
Committee on Calendar, in presenting reports in such an order so 
as to expedite the business of the Conference as well as other re- 



The United Methodist Church 251 

sponsibilities of the Committee. This is in reverse of what you just 
passed and the secretary could have done this but this makes sure 
that it is the General Conference that elects upon nomination of the 
secretary. 

Bishop Hardin: Any questions? If you w^ill approve, show the hand. 
Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Herr: Under 4, now we come to 2, amend rule VI.D.(d), you 
add vice-chairman. These matters have to do with the Coaching 
Conferences that are set up by the secretary, it was deemed advisable 
to also include the vice-chairman in the Coaching Conference. And 
then in the sixth line to add the times of the daily deadline for pub- 
lishing reports. That tightens the matter of when these reports should 
get in the hands of the secretary and then in the seventh line, instead 
of having chairman and secretaries, you have the word committees. 
You have used the word chairman and secretaries several times 
before. 

Bishop Hardin: Any questions? If you will approve, show the 
hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

John D. Herr: Now, will the delegates turn to page 240 of the 
Handbook. This has to do with the Duties and Prerogatives of the 
Committees, and at the very beginning of rule 31, you insert these 
words: "As its first work, the Committee shall evaluate its petitions, 
come to agreements regarding priority, and outline its work on the 
basis of these priorities." It's very clear that it's the intent of the 
Rules Committee to recommend to you that as far as possible matters 
come to you in the light of the priority assigned by the Legislative 
Committees. 

Bishop Hardin: Any discussion or question? If you will approve, 
show the hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Herr: Turn to page 240 of the Handbook. This has to do with 
the Legislative Committee reports coming to the secretary. "As quick- 
ly as the material can be prepared, each secretary of a Standing 
Legislative Committee shall present a clearly marked original work 
copy of the Committee's report." Before it was three copies. This 
will relieve the secretary of much of the work. But this one copy 
which is clearly marked should be signed by the Committee Chairman 
and the Secretary of the Conference. I don't think that I need to 
read the additional part of that, although, I hope that the secretaries 
of all the committees will read that and follow it very carefully. 

Biship Hardin: Thank you. Any question? If you will approve, 
show the hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

M?'. Herr read the proposed changes in Rule 33 (see 
page 202). Bishop Hardin put the proposal to a vote, and 
the changes were approved. 

Mr. Herr: Now, Bishop, five comes to us directly from the Com- 
mission on Entertainment and Program, and they have worked very 
closely with Dr. White and Dr. Hole, who have been the secretary, 
and before that Dr. Moore, and this has been cleared with ... by the 
Executive Committee of the Council on Bishops; and the proposal is 
not to elect a secretary for this General Conference, but to elect a 
secretary-designate, who will take over when all the work of this 
General Conference is completed, but at a date not later than a year 
following this General Conference. The exact time when that secre- 
tary-designate would take over would be determined by the Commis- 
sion on Entertainment and Program, but not later than 12 months 
after the adjournment of the General Conference. 



252 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Bishop Hardin: All right, I think that's clear. Any questions? If you 
favor, show the hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Herr: Now, on page 219, this Rule 4 which has to do with 
the secretaries, this is the reverse of the action you've just taken, 
and it simply spells out what the duties of the Secretary of this 
General Conference are. 

Bishop Hardin: Any question about that? If you will approve, show 
the hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

Mr. Herr: Now, Mr. Chairman, Bishop Hardin, the Part 3 item, 
submitted for consideration, I would ask that the General Conference 
refer these to the newly elected Plan of Organization and Rules 
Committee to report back at a later date at this General Conference. 

Bishop Hardin: Thank you. If you will accept that and approve 
the report so far as it has been made, show the hands. Opposed by 
the same sign. It is done. 

Interpreter for Delegates from Angola 

Paul A. Diiffey (Alabama-West Florida) moved that 
Zacarias Cardoso be seated without participation, but with 
credentials allowing access to the floor for the purpose of 
serving as an interpreter for the two delegates from 
Angola. The motion was seconded and approved. 

Election of Secretary and Secretary-Designate 

Bishop Roy H. Short (Secretary, Council of Bishops) : Mr. Chair- 
mian, in line with the action provided for in the adoption of the Re- 
port of the Committee on Rules, the Council of Bishops nominates 
Dr. J. Wesley Hole as Secretary of the 1972 General Conference and 
J. B. Holt as Secretary-Designate, the Secretary-Designate to take 
over when all work related to the present session is completed, the 
exact date to be determined by the Commission on Entertainment 
and Program. 

Bishop Hardin: You've heard the nomination. The Discipline pro- 
vides that nominations may also be made from the floor. Are there 
any other nominations? If not, do I hear a motion to accept the 
Report and the nomination? If you will accept the Report, show the 
hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is done. 

J. Wesley Hole presented the list of nominations for the 
secretarial staff (see page 15). The persons nominated 
by Dr. Hole were elected. 

Inasmuch as the time set on the agenda for recess had 
passed Bishop Hardin inquired as to the will of the body. 
Kenneth Cooper (Alabama- West Florida) moved that the 
conference proceed with hearing the Episcopal Address; 
the motion was not seconded, having L. Sr/iith (Oklahoma) 
moved that the conference be in recess for ten minutes. 
The motion was seconded and carried. 

Following the recess special music was presented by the 
Candler Choraliers. 

The Episcopal Address 

The Episcopal Address was given by Bishop F, Gerald 
Ensley (see page 205). 



The United Methodist Church 253 

Nominations — Standing Administrative Committees 

Bishop Roy H. Short (Secretary, Council of Bishops) 
presented the names of persons nominated by the Council 
of Bishops to serve on the Committee on Presiding Officers 
(see page 22), the Committee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order (see page 21), the Committee on Journal 
(see page 21), the Committee on Credentials (see page 20), 
the Committee on Courtesies and Privileges (see page 20), 
and the Committee on Calendar (see page 20). Bishop Short 
also presented the name of Edsel A. Aminons (Northern 
Illinois) as a nomination to the Committee on Reference as 
appointed by the Council of Bishops at its Fall meeting to 
serve in place of Wayne Calbert (Mississippi-FCJ), who 
was being nominated to serve on the Committee on 
Calendar. 

The nominations were approved by a show of hands. 
(Note: Those nominated by the Council of Bishops were 
the same as listed membership of the committees with two 
exceptions. Daniel L. Shearer (Central Pennsylvania) was 
nominated to the Committee on Courtesies and Privileges, 
but Grafitas E. Hoopert (Central Pennsylvania) was substi- 
tuted for him at a later session. Wanda Walls (Youth) was 
nominated to the Committee on Calendar at a later session 
after the General Conference voted to enlarge the commit- 
tee.) 

Agenda Amended 

Bishop Hardin inquired as to how the conference wished 
to proceed in view of the fact that it had been unable to 
complete items listed in the agenda in the time allotted. 
Charles B. Purdham (Minnesota) asked a question about 
the agenda. Ted I. Richardson (Southwest Texas) moved 
that the conference proceed to the Structure Study Com- 
mission report and defer hearing the Theological Study 
Commission report until Tuesday. Carroll H, Long (Hol- 
ston) moved a substitute that the conference adhere to the 
agenda as mimeographed and distributed. J. Wesley Hole 
(General Conference Secretary) explained the procedure 
that would be followed in the afternoon legislative commit- 
tee sessions under the existing agenda. John H. Rixse, Jr. 
(Virginia) spoke against the procedure outlined by Dr. 
Hole. Irving L. Smith (Oklahoma) spoke against the substi- 
tute and in favor of the main motion. Albert C. Outler 
(North Texas) stated that the Theological Study Commis- 
sion did not object to the deferral of its report. The substi- 
tute was defeated. The main motion was approved. 

Privilege Motion 

John H. Rixse (Virginia) : I have a matter of personal privilege 
motion; I move that upon completion of Dow Kirkpatrick's presenta- 



254 Jo7irnal of the 1972 General Conference 

tion of the report of the Structure Study Committee and prior to 
any parliamentary actions which would cut off debate, that as a 
matter of personal privilege, the General Conference hear a statement 
from Professor Albert C. Outler. 

Bishop Hardin: Is there a second? Do you want to discuss it? 
If you will grant it, show the hand. Opposed by the same sign. It 
is done. 

Structure Study Commission — Dow Kirkpatrick 

Dow Kirkpatrick (Northern Illinois), Chairman of the 
Structure Study Commission, presented the report. He 
called attention to corrections which should be made in 
the report as printed and distributed and outlined the 
procedure to be followed by members of the Commission 
in presenting various aspects of the proposal. 

Dow Kirkpatrick: The General Conference in 1968 was the focal 
point of a variety of forces, all saying that change which is respon- 
sible to the future is the best form of faithfulness in the present 
and our greatest honor to the past. So a Structure Study Commission 
was appointed; the process is norinally amended to what we have; 
and now we bring you a whole document. What we have heard in 
these four years from the church at all levels clearly is that the 
elements in the board and agency structures of The United Methodist 
Church which offer the least power for mission in the future and 
maybe even some drag are those elements which cannot be dealt 
with by amending one board here and another one there. Rather, 
these elements are part of the whole system, and they must be dealt 
with in their wholeness if this system is to be renewed. 

The twinful side of this system is first, that the general agencies 
resource the local church in its mission and, secondly, that the general 
agencies make possible mission-fulfillment by doing those things on 
behalf of local disciples that can only be done by being together as a 
corporate entity. The criteria for judging our model, by which we 
judge it ourselves, are on page two of the Preamble: coordination, 
ongoing accountability, flexibility within this accountability, the rep- 
resentation of the pluralities of the church, and the kind of ef- 
fectiveness which comes from efficiency and economy. You have before 
you, on your desks, the cost analysis which we offer at this time, of 
the comparison of our model with the present system. May I just 
highlight what that says. 

First, you have a comparative chart of the membership of struc- 
tural models. Presently there are 1100 members on all the agencies, 
but approximately 300 of them are dual. So something like 700 per- 
sons are involved. In the proposed model there would be a minimum 
of 780, a maximum of 1083. It has been our feeling that you did 
not want savings by cutting down on the membership participation 
in agencies. However, the cost analysis shows a saving of $14,000 
estimated in cost of annual meetings of these members by the con- 
solidations that take place and a further savings of $200,000 in the 
reduction of general staff officers. The reduction in the number of 
agencies is given you as from presently 47 units to 33 units. 

This model eliminates all interboards, drastically reduces the num- 
ber of commissions and disciplinary committees, and at the same 
time lowers the number of boards and increases the number of 
divisions. This reduction is estimated at approximately $280,000 to 
$300,000. The systems cost study shows the possibility of an additional 
$221,000 to $250,000. There are a number of points there illustrating 
where those would be made in the system. 



The United Methodist Church 255 

Then on the final page there are 6 summary paragraphs. I want 
to refer to 3 of them. The first one — it is not the understanding of 
the commission that restructuring was being called for primarily 
for economic reasons. Secondly, that any savings resulting from 
restructure would not result in a reduced apportionment to local 
churches but would result in a redistribution of resources from ad- 
ministration to program needs. 

And very importantly, number five, this study is based on the 
present structure model and that proposed by the Structure Study 
Commission. This study is not an attempt to compare the costs of 
alternate proposals, which are all increased over their present size 
and over the size of the Structure Study Commission model. Finally, 
in this opening presentation I would just like to indicate that there 
are three principles of administration that we see point toward the 
future and in some sense open us up to newness. 

First, in the areas of coordination, in addition to that kind we are 
familiar with in the church where somebody referees the overlapping 
of plans already made independently, we add to that more effective 
coordination of providing a flow from prior research and planning 
which shakes coordinated implementation. It is better to avoid these 
conflicts than to let a group of semi-autonomous units frame their 
own plans and then adjudicate them, though we need both kinds. 

The second principle that is important here is that traditionally 
when we have wanted to enhance a cause, we have separated it out 
from evex-ything else. If it was the time for evangelism or education 
or social concerns, we separated it out, made it a board of its own, 
gave it its own members, gave it its own budget, gave it its own 
General Secretary. In this day it is our belief that to enhance the 
cause you do not separate it from others ; you bring it into dynamic 
relationship. For example, the Board of Discipleship brings together 
worship, evangelism, stewardship, lay life and work and local church 
education. 

Everyone is enhanced because it is related to the other. In the 
present system at least three of those deal with worship in the local 
church. Would it not strengthen the local church and its worship 
ministry if they worked together? 

One other illustration of how dynamic relationship increases the 
value of a function, rather than separating it, this new age of ecu- 
menical witness. In our model we feel that that becomes a larger 
concept than ever before because it is brought into dynamic relation- 
ship with all global ministries, all of which are rapidly becoming 
ecumenical. In other words, we lift the signs of ecumenicity far 
beyond the importance of COCU and other local U.S. matters and 
begin to see that all of our former missions which were dealt with 
in a missionary context are now chui'ches in their own right, and we 
deal with them ecumenically as church to church. 

Finally, this report introduces a confidence in participation of 
local level Christians. Elites are needed, and still are needed, in 
Methodism at some places, but elitism is not needed in the policy 
decision places, such as General Conference and Council on Ministries. 
When a delegate to the Council on Ministries becomes an expert, 
he becomes, we think, disqualified. He ought to be sent back home 
and somebody sent with a f I'esh voice. 

The Question of Representation 

Mrs. Martin Harvey (Structure Study Commission) : Throughout 
the model we have sought to provide the structural means by which 
the system is opened up to the voices of the local church and the 
plurality and diversities in the whole life of the church. And in so 
doing we, according to some, have exceeded our mandate, but we have 



256 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

followed where we have been led by the Spirit. And this is evidenced 
that we . . . this openness of which we are talking, by placing board 
and staff under tenure for the first time, restricting them to eight 
years of service in a chosen role, instead of life sentence, thus giving 
you the opportunity of providing the church with your multiple 
wealth of untapped and unused talent. 

It is further evidenced by the shortening the twelve-year tenure 
of board members to eight years, so that many more Methodists may 
experience national board participation. It is evidenced again by 
providing that the general secretaries of the program boards be 
elected by persons directly responsible to annual conferences. And 
again, by providing that in every board each division will be able to 
elect persons with special skills and contributions who will serve as 
members at large of the division and provide the expertise and 
continuity that is needed. 

We have listened to the voices of the diverse and pluralistic groups 
that offer enrichment to the life of the church. Youth, young adults, 
women, the ethnic minorities of the Hispanic American, the Indian 
American, the Asian American, and the Black American. Much of 
what we heard came from their caucuses, of which there are two 
kinds. The first is the formally organized caucus, which is disci- 
plinary and has disciplinary structures, and which is officially repre- 
sented by youth and young adults. And the second kind of caucus, 
to which our bishop spoke this morning, is the ad hoc, informal 
caucus, sensitizing agents, representing women and the ethnic minor- 
ity. For all of these we have provided in the model an opportunity 
for those of us in the minority relationship to the church, to par- 
ticipate in the process of selecting who shall represent us. 

In listening and having heart, we have showii that we care by 
providing a broader based representation for the inclusive church as 
it seeks to become more relevant to the new day, the new age, which 
is now. And so your opportunity is in the days and hours that lie 
ahead, as you meet and study on the report, to also listen and to 
really hear and to show that you care. 

Council on Ministries Proposed 

Richard Cain (Southern California- Arizona) : Bishop Hardin, 
ladies and gentlemen of the General Conference: I should like to 
draw your attention to the proposal for a Council on Ministries 
which is contained in paragraphs 825 to 834 and page 86 of the 
Daily Christian Advocate. Each four years the Annual Conference 
of the church elect persons to come for a two-week period to review, 
consider and set the directions for the life of the church. By our 
Constitution and by our practice, there is indicated that the Annual 
Conferences are the basic, and fundamental, bodies of the church 
and that whenever there are decisions to be made for the life of the 
entire church, the Annual Conference shall be directly responsible, 
related and determine those decisions. . . . You will note that the 
Council on Ministries had as its basic membership those who are 
elected in a free election by the Annual Conference, the funda- 
mental body. The reason for suggesting categories is to enable us 
to ensure that the total representation shall indeed be representative 
of the life and membership of the Annual Conferences. 

The heavy majority of the voting members are made up of those 
who originally sent in and are sent by the Annual Conference — first, 
to exercise that two-week responsibility to review and determine the 
life of the church and the General Conference, and then that person 
to continue that process under the mandate and the direction of the 
General Conference in the ensuing period that shall come between 
sessions of the General Conference. 



The United Methodist Church 257 

There is direct relationship and accountability to the Annual Con- 
ference as the basic body of the church. It also enables by the selection 
of these persons by the basic body a direct and regular input of 
information, of reaction, of suggestions and questions by those who 
made up the representatives to the Annual Conference, It clearly 
enumerates and sets forth so that every minister and member of 
the church has a person to whom they can go to inquire concerning 
the life and work of the denomination that they love and the church 
that they would rightly serve. We have hoped that in the proposal 
that is before you for consideration we have indeed enabled the 
Annual Conference to exercise more fully its right and responsibility 
to be directly involved whenever there is a decision to be made in 
the life of the church, which is the principle of the General Con- 
ference. 

Secondly, we trust that in the Council on Ministries model for 
your consideration, we have used at every juncture the model of the 
General Conference. Please note that we have suggested that you 
consider that if the Council on Ministries be established that it shall 
utilize the staff of the church, the civil service of the church, as 
does the General Conference as it goes about its task of making 
decisions in the life of the church. We feel that this is a sound 
principle that has been proven time after time by the actions of this 
General Conference. . . . 

Secondly, following the general model of the General Conference, 
we are proposing that there be brought into the arena where deci- 
sions and considerations shall be made with reference to the program 
and life of the church, all persons who are responsible and who must 
carry out the requirements of the General Conference in its session. 
Therefore, in the general meetings of the Council on Ministries, we 
have suggested that in addition to the voting membership that must 
make the decisions, there be the chief administrators of the church 
charged with carrying out the action of the General Conference and 
interpreting and insuring the program. 

So we feel it is important to have the voice of the Bishops and the 
General Secretaries of the church present each time these considera- 
tions are to be debated and decisions made by those charged by the 
Annual Conferences with making such decisions. It would seem to 
us that if we do provide this measure and procedure that we have 
provided in this agency of the General Conference a means by which 
the church can continually go about its task of reforming and re- 
newal and decision-making for the good of the life of the church. 
You will also note that we have suggested that the same model for 
election be followed and that there be a new Council on Ministries 
elected each four years as is the case in the General Conference. 

Thirdly, we do recognize that there is to be some power exercised 
by the Council on Ministries as there is power to be exercised by 
any agency or established group in the church. We would respectfully 
suggest that you consider the fact that we are changing the basis 
on which the continuing decisions must be made in the life of the 
church. 

There are no decisions entrusted to the Council on Ministries that 
are not now entrusted to groups within the church. It brings all of 
these decisions into an open arena where there are elected representa- 
tives from the Annual Conferences, who may be heard, may interpret 
and then may decide for the life of the church. This means that 
rather than groups . . . smaller groups which are nominated by other 
responsible groups in the church, this is now entrusted to those are 
elected by, responsible to, and must answer to the Annual Conferences 
as the beginning point of authority and of action in the life of the 
church. 



258 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

It would appear to us that the primary power entrusted to the 
Council on Ministries, and we suggest it for your consideration, is 
that they will be in continual review and have authority to act with 
reference to structure in the life of the church after it has been 
recommended by the stated boards and subject to the subsequent 
ratification of each General Conference, but it does provide the flexi- 
bility and the possibility of structure which seems imperative in our 
day and time if we are to be the church that this General Conference 
intends. 

Lastly, ladies and gentlemen, it seems to us that we have before 
you a proposal for your consideration that will give us a means by 
which we can have a flexible, responsible and responsive group that 
can extend and enable the life and ministry of this portion of Christ's 
Holy Church. Thank you. 

Support Agencies 

Ian Rolland: Bishop Hardin, members of the General Conference, 
the proposed Council on Finance and Administration, The Board of 
Communications and Publications, and The Board of Pensions provide 
numerous support services for the Council on Ministries, the program 
agencies, and the church at large. In these agencies are located many 
functions which have previously been scattered among numerous 
boards and agencies. In the Council on Finance and Administration, 
there has been a significant centralization of fiscal and administrative 
support services. But there is not in this agency a centralization of 
policy-making authority. Centralization of these support services will 
result in the economies and efficiencies of operation which the Com- 
mission has felt the church desires in the new structure. This type 
of centralization however does not necessarily imply a greater con- 
centration of power. Through this new Council the church can take 
advantage of economies inherent in larger scale administrative proce- 
dures. There should also be a more efficient management of the funds 
of the Church. However, it is important to note that in no way can 
the Council influence program policy through these administrative 
activities. 

The budgeting process recommended in the new structure is a 
significant portion of the report. Both the Council on Ministries and 
the Council on Finance and Administration will be involved in the 
determination of the program budget. This process will give progi-am- 
ming persons a primary voice in the determination of program bud- 
gets, while also giving fiscal persons an opportunity to participate. 
This proposal, we believe, moves toward greater control over program 
budgets by program people than exists under the present structure. 
We believe this represents a significant diffusion of power. 

In the Board of Communications and Publications diverse com- 
munications activities are brought together. It is expected that each 
form of communication will benefit from the ideas and expertise of 
other forms. The Structure Commission believes that this will provide 
for a greater sharing of technology in communications, and it 
recognizes that publishing is one of the forms of communications. 
This belief has led the Commission to a proposal for a single board 
involving both communications and publishing activities. 

The Board of Pensions in the new structure will remain as a 
separate and independent agency. This proposal assures that the 
integrity of pension fund assets be preserved. There should be no 
fear that pension assets or income therefrom can be used for any 
other purpose than providing pensions. In summary, in these support 
agencies many of the administrative activities have been concentrated 
to provide economy and primarily efficiency. However in the bud- 



The United Methodist Church 259 

geting area, the shared responsibilities of the Council on Ministries 
and the Council on Finance and Administration should insure a 
decentralization of the policy making function. 

Program Agencies 

Bishop Paul A. Washburn: ... In previous legislation for our boards 
and agencies it has been our custom for almost every board and 
agency to put in its legislation a statement of purpose. You will 
note if you will look carefully at the document that we have selected 
one of these statements and included it in the legislation for the 
Council on Ministries as an overall statement of the aim of mission 
for the boards and agencies of The United Methodist Church. And 
I would like to call it to our attention because it really is a focus 
upon what we want to be saying to the world and to ourselves 
through the administrative agencies of the church — paragraph 828. 

Opposite page 4 at the beginning of the report you will find a 
listing of the way we see the functions of the church arranged under 
the proposal for four new boards. Let me speak first of all of the foci 
upon which these four boards are fixed. The Board of Church and 
Society is an attempt to focus the attention of the church upon the 
social issues of our time. The Board of Discipleship is an attempt 
to focus the enei'gies of the general church upon the needs of the local 
church. The Board of Global Ministries is an attempt to focus the 
interest of the general church upon global consideration, that is, what 
does the gospel of Christ have to say on six continents. The Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry is an attempt to focus the mind of the 
general church upon the preparation of personnel for the ongoing 
life and work of the church. It has been our intention in this arrange- 
ment of boards that no present function of any agency be lost if it 
is valid for our time. However, we have in the interest of flexibility 
not developed legislation below the level of the division. Our present 
Discipline contains much more legislation in almost every case than 
is proposed by this Commission on Structure. We have the legislation 
for the board and then to the division level but not for sections or 
for departments. 

If you will look at this chart which I have called to your attention 
you should be able to identify the divisions which are suggested for 
the four boards. Under Church and Society: General Welfare, World 
Peace, Human Relations, Emerging Social Issues; under Discipleship: 
Evangelism, Worship and Stewardship, Lay Life and Work, and 
Education; under Global Ministries: Education and Cultivation, Na- 
tional Division, Women's Division, World Division, Ecumenical and 
Interreligious Concerns, United Methodist Commission on Overseas 
Relief, Health and Welfare Ministries; under Higher Education and 
Ministry: Higher Education, The Ordained Ministry, Chaplains, Lay 
Ministries, Office of Personnel. 

It is our intention that the mission of this church shall remain 
relevant and that the agencies which are to guide it are to have 
flexibility and a chance to move in that relevance in our time. Thank 
you. 

Procedure for Considering the Report 

Dow Kirkpatrick (Northern Illinois) presented Richard 
W. Cain (Southern California- Arizona) for the purpose of 
making procedural motions on behalf of the Structure Study 
Commission. Richard Pittenger (South Dakota) moved to 



260 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

reconsider the action allowing Dr. Outler to make a state- 
ment. Mr. Pittenger spoke on behalf of his motion. 

Melvin Brawn (California-Nevada) : I move a substitute motion 
which I think will accomplish more than this motion I just made. 

Resolved, that the report of the Structure Study Commission be 
made the order of the day for an afternoon plenary session, instead 
of the legislative committees, and further. 

Be it resolved, that the purpose of standing Rule number 19 dealing 
with the main question be interpreted to allow substantial debate on 
the main question, and that this debate not be prevented by 
parliamentary tricks, by the use of premature motions which would 
prevent debate on the entire report, and that these provisions last for 
the duration of the afternoon session. 

Mr. Brawn spoke in behalf of his substitute. John H. 
Rixse, Jr. (Virginia) stated that the purpose of his motion 
to allow Dr. Outler this privilege was to ensure debate. 
Jack M. Tnell (Pacific Northwest) raised a point of order 
that Mr. Brawn's motion was not germane to the motion to 
reconsider the previous action. The Chair ruled that the 
substitute was not germane. Kenneth E. Metcalf (Iowa) 
raised a point of order, asking if Mr. Pittenger had voted 
for the motion to hear Dr. Outler's statement. Mr. Pittenger 
replied that he had, and the Chair ruled that the motion 
to reconsider was in order. Carroll H. Long (Holston) 
spoke against the motion to reconsider. George L. Poor 
(Pacific Northwest) raised a point of order that the motion 
to reconsider had to be voted before debate on the action 
itself was in order. The Chair ruled in favor of the point of 
order. The motion to reconsider was defeated. 

Richard 0. Johnson (California-Nevada) raised a point 
of order that if Dr. Outler's remarks were in the nature of 
debate, Mr. Rixse's privilege motion was out of order. Ker- 
mit Burrous (North Indiana) moved that Dr. Outler be 
allowed the same amount of time as other speakers under 
the provisions of Rule 37. The motion was defeated. 

Melvin Brawn (California-Nevada) asked to introduce 
his substitute motion which had been ruled out of order 
earlier. Thomas L. Cromtvell (East Ohio) raised a point of 
order that Mr. Brawn's motion would only be in order as a 
substitute to the procedural motions the Structure Study- 
Commission wished to present. Erwin H. Schwiebert (Ore- 
gon-Idaho) moved to extend the time to 1:00 p.m. The 
motion carried. 

Gilbert H. Caldwell, Jr. (Southern New England) ex- 
pressed concern that the time allotted to Black Methodists 
for Church Renewal might be lost due to the pressure of 
time. 

Albert C. Outler (North Texas) suggested that the way to 
expedite a decision was to vote on Mr. Brawn's motion. 



The United Methodist Church 261 

Floyd H, Coffman (Kansas East) offered a procedural mo- 
tion but was ruled out of order. Mr. Brawn's motion for an 
afternoon plenary session was adopted. 

John C. Satterfield (Mississippi) moved that the Con- 
ference recess until 2:30 p.m. The Chair stated that the 
Conference had already decided to hold a plenary session 
in the afternoon. William E. Trice (North Texas) moved 
that the Conference hear the presentation from Black Meth- 
odists for Church Renewal. Mr. Satterfield raised a point 
of order that his motion to recess was in order and should 
be put to a vote. The Chair ruled that Mr. Satterfield was 
correct. Woodie W. White (Detroit) objected that the Chair 
had assured Black Methodists for Church Renewal that they 
would have an opportunity to speak. The motion to recess 
was adopted. The motion to hear Black Methodists for 
Church Renewal for five minutes before recess was adopted. 

Black Methodists for Church Renewal 

Gilbert H. Caldwell, Jr. (Southern New England) pre- 
sented other representatives of Black Methodists for Church 
Renewal: Mrs. Thelma Barnes, Associate Executive; Mrs. 
Mary Good (Detroit), Vice-Chairman of the Board; and 
Cain H. Felder (Southern New England), Executive Di- 
rector. 

Mr. Caldwell: My name is Gilbert H. Caldwell and I happen to be 
chairman of Black Methodists for Church Renewal. It is important 
that initially I make some preparatory statements, Mr. Chairman and 
delegates, for somehow we have not yet really wrapped our minds 
around the fact that God speaks not only through the orthodoxy of the 
legislative process. Sometimes God speaks through the unorthodoxy, 
unscheduled intrusion. And one of the things that we must wrestle 
with within this United Methodist Church is how we grapple with 
our massive tendency to preserve orderliness. One of the things that 
we must wrestle with within this United Methodist Church is when 
is the power of God going to grab us the way Robert's Rules of Order 
have. 

It is quite possible then that some of you find yourselves saying 
in these moments that here they go again. And so you have turned 
off your psychological hearing aids, you have put on your blinders, 
you have readjusted the rose-colored glasses. Some of you are saying 
that you are hurting your cause, and yet if you say this, you are 
standing in a significant company of American people, for they said 
that you remember; some people even said that Whitney Young was 
hurting his cause. A lot of folks said that Adam Clayton Powell 
was hurting the cause, and a lot of people said that Malcolm X was 
hurting the cause, and a lot of people said that Martin Luther King 
was hurting the cause. And, yet, somehow in their death, some of 
these same persons recognized the validity of their cause and pretend 
they are staunch supporters. 

Black people have been sustained by their church. It has been 
through the black church that we have been reminded that God 
can make a way out of no way. It has been through the church 
that we have discovered that though the world has treated us as 



262 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

nobody, God in Christ has declared that we are somebody. It has 
been in and through the church that we have preserved our sanity 
in an insane world; and so throughout this land and in broken down 
rural churches, in Gothic cathedrals that have been abandoned by 
white congregations, in store fronts, we have felt the power of the 
living God. 

We are foolish enough, my friends, to believe, to believe that this 
same kind of thing can happen to The United Methodist Church. For 
as we look at our fathers and our grandfathers and our great-grand- 
fathers who labored in the Methodist Church without resources, 
without staff, perhaps without adequate budgets, they were able to 
develop a fellowship, they were able to proclaim the Word of God. 
And somehow if United Methodism with its vast resources cannot 
do this then something is wrong. 

In 1976 this nation will be observing, I believe, a 200th anniversary. 
There is a real possibility that as United Methodists we may be con- 
vening again in a General Conference or something like that. Would 
it not be significant if in this General Conference Session, we would 
say that during the next quadrennium, we as United Methodists would 
pledge ourselves to help this nation and truly become "the land of 
the free and the home of the brave?" 

It is so easy for you to be deceived into believing that because you 
see more black people now than you have ever before that— that you 
find us in places where you have not previously seen us — that this is 
somehow an indication of progress. But I would say to you, and we in 
Black Methodists for Church Renewal say to you, that we in The 
United Methodist Church have been doing in 1970, '71 and '72 what 
the old Methodist Church should have done in 1939. And so we ai'e 
simply reaching into the past to do what should have been done then, 
and so we have this strange dilemma, we have this strange dilemma 
of trying to do today what we should have done yesterday and at the 
same time doing today what we must do today. 

Black people are professionals, but even as we recognize the possible 
increasing rate of black professionals, we've got to recognize the 
increasing rate of drug addicts. Even though we recognize that maybe 
there are more blacks in college than ever before, there are more 
school dropouts. Even though within The United Methodist Church 
and in other institutions there are blacks in high positions, we have 
to wrestle with the whole question of why is it that black young 
people are not finding themelves within The United Methodist Church. 
Somehow individual success has had no effect on the poor masses. 

In Atlanta there is a section called "Buttermilk Bottom." There are 
still the Harlems, the Newarks, and all remain the same with their 
dilapidated housing, with their high incidence of lead poisoning and 
perpetual despair. And so, as Black Methodists for Church Renewal, 
we come to you today as United Methodists to say, first of all, we 
want this church to place at the heart of its doing and being a 
primary commitment to support black causes in guaranteed ways 
rather than in voluntary ways. We want United Methodism to let 
the Structure Study Commission report push us into deeper missional 
activity rather than prolong the navel-gazing. 

Let it not be said in an election year, in a time of increased tension 
in Vietnam, in a time of economic recession, that 1,000 United 
Methodists spent two weeks in Atlanta tinkering and oiling their 
machinery. We want United Methodism to become the kind of loving, 
caring, God-dominated institution that no matter how you look and no 
matter how angry you are at the system, no matter how militant 
you are, no matter where you came from or who your parents were 
or what your income is, ours is a church that welcomes you. We want 
United Methodism to somehow begin the risk to risk its very institu- 



The United Methodist Church 263 

tional life in order to find its soul. Our nation is in deeper trouble 
than we imagine. Our arrogance and our cruelty is vividly exposed in 
the Vietnam fiasco. Our absence as a people of ethical virtue is evident 
when we recognize that even with the sophistication of the FBI and 
the CIA we cannot put a dent in the drug traffic. Our perverted 
technology is seen when we can build classy motels and hotels and 
civic centers like this, but we cannot build adequate housing for poor 
people. Our mixed up priorities are clear when we see that we can 
teach a man to fly to the moon, but we cannot teach a child in an inner 
city school to read and write. But God through his church can make a 
difference. God through his church can make a difference. 

And what this church needs — what this nation needs — is a church of 
the living God. What this nation needs is a church which is about the 
business of being the church. And when I talk about this nation, I'm 
not talking about a group of people gathering on Sunday morning in 
the White House to play chui'ch. I am not talking about the kind of 
churchmanship that is demonstrated by a barn-storming evangelist. 
I am talking about a church that tells it like it is and makes it like 
it ought to be. 

Black United Methodists and a lot of other people want to be a part 
of that kind of church. And so in many different ways we are doing 
what we can to cajole, to push, to legislate, to pray The United Meth- 
odist Church into being a church that makes a difference in the doing 
of business. Somewhere in our literature there are the words, and 
I paraphrase them: "Are you the one or should we look for another?" 
This is what thousands, yea millions, of people are asking about The 
United Methodist Church. Are we the church or should they go about 
the process of creating something else? Are we the church or should 
they be about the process of creating a counter church? 

I say to you today may God help us to make The United Methodist 
Church the church for these times. And now I present to you the 
Reverend Cain Felder, the Executive Director of the BMCR. 

Cain Felder (Southern New England) : I am sorry, I am really 
sorry; I know how difficult it is for you. It is difficult, very difficult for 
us too; we don't even want to be up here. Now we are going to take 
a little time, that some people want, but it is not going to be too long, 
unreasonably long, but we feel we have given a lot of time to The 
Methodist Church. We feel black people have given a lot of time to The 
Methodist Church, black people have given a lot of time to this society. 
So we want to take our time with all due respects, we are not going 
to make a special or anything like that. Just to say a few things, to 
add a point to some of the things that our chairman has said. I 
want to say to some people who may be wondering why a man follow- 
ing another man when we had two sisters up here. I want you to 
understand that in the black community, the black women stand with 
the black men, because they understand the struggle. They know what 
we are going through, and so we don't have false distinctions among 
us, we don't have a generation gap. We don't have woman divided 
against man. That is a distinctively Anglo-Saxon, western, white 
phenomenon, and oppressed people are alien to us, and so we don't 
have problems with that. 

The United Methodist Church is probably the one religious de- 
nomination which best reflects the composition of American society at 
large. This is a fact. It has the largest and most diversified ethnic 
constituency; it operates on a federated or connectional system of so- 
called representative democracy. It has broad representation of every 
type of person and profession within its membership. It has a large 
operation and entanglements on the international scene; it has mas- 
sive financial and technical resources at its disposal. We have to admit 



264 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

that. It has a history of being divided because of race and a con- 
tinuing history of trying to move from racially segregated structures 
to patterns of integration which vs^ould appear to be more Christian. 
Black people within The United Methodist Church have to be sorely 
frustrated at this time. What we recognize as obvious solutions to our 
problems as people, The United Methodist Church, much like the 
government, just cannot do. It will not provide because both The 
United Methodist Church and the government are essentially blind 
to the subtleties of white racism which exist in our time. Intellectually 
white people know what it will take to uplift the downtrodden people 
of color. White people are intelligent. White people are rational. White 
people are well schooled. White people read books. White people write 
books. They know if those books had any validity, what it takes to lift 
people who have been historically exploited up from the depths of 
despair. However, neither the Christian commitment of the church 
nor the willingness of the church to really take seriously what it means 
to embrace the sacrificial theology of Christ, nor the quest which exists 
amongst too many for power and control over the destinies of other 
people, nor the primitive emotions which overcome the intelligence 
which we should have and concern for the future survival of mankind 
with dignity, will permit this. 

Despite our head which knows the right, the heart of the church is 
essentially stubborn and cold. As a result black folk, at long last, are 
aware of the fact that what we really want we can only give ourselves, 
even though the church should give it, because what the church has 
in terms of the millions of dollars, the tremendous power and in- 
fluence, what the church gives really belongs to the people who have 
been downtrodden. It really belongs to the mine workers in South 
Africa; it belongs to the people who work the chrome, the majority 
in Zimbabwe or Rhodesia. It belongs to black people, Hispanic people, 
Asian people, the majority in the world. Our collective frustration 
emerges when black folk recognize that what The United Methodist 
Church is capable of giving will only in the most modest, the most 
gradual way contribute to the relieving of the desperate pain felt 
by too many people now. 

This situation forces us to attempt to make only modest requests 
as we try to make the best of a bad situation. For example, we ask 
for a guarantee of $6,000,000 per year for the black colleges, even 
though we recognize that at every point major control of these institu- 
tions remains in the hands of white people. To ask whites to give to 
the so-called Negro colleges is the mildest of petitions, since whites 
are more accurately giving to themselves only indirectly. For so much 
forces people of color to conform, to imitate, to deny themselves, to 
imitate the value systems, the standards, the curriculum, the behavior 
of the dominant society, the white culture. 

It has been astutely argued that the Negro colleges are designed 
to make us like you. A Greek quotation: "What manner of man is 
this . . ." to make us be conversant in an idiom not our own. We don't 
know ourselves because we have been forced out of ourselves, forfeit- 
ing much of the uniqueness which emanates from our distinctive 
black heritage. In not any petition or resolution which BMCR brings 
before this General Conference is there anything particularly revolu- 
tionary or radical. The assumption is that you have forced us to take 
the long view toward liberation and social change. 

Our existential now has been transferred into an eternal now. Yet 
we are not discouraged, for we know as black folk that a thousand 
years in the sight of man is but a twinkling of an eye in the sight 
of God, and God is on the side of the darker people who must have 
their day, who must rise. What we really want, we can't have because 
you are not prepared to give it; you are not prepared to give what is 



The United Methodist Church 265 

not yours but what belongs to God. America like most of the third 
world is the scene of a fantastic, historical debt still unacknowledged ; 
it is a scene where a great robbery has been taking place; a robbery 
of the poor and their natural resources turn in the final analysis 
back upon them haunting and oppressing all of us. 

Black people have come of age. Today we have learned to ask only 
for that which is in The United Methodist Church's capacity to give. 
And by this definition our requests, our petitions, our resolutions have 
to represent very little. Given this it does not seem incredible to us, 
that is does seem incredible to us that many white people here today 
will still see BMCR requests as a huge and unrealistic demand. None 
of us can fail to ignore the almost insurmountable breach between 
people of color and the white majority which has established itself 
constitutional majority here in America. 

These United Methodists must ask, is it really the time now to end 
a quadrennium of emphasis that has just begun to understand the 
depth of reconciliation? We have only begun recently to discover the 
height of the dividing walls of hostility which really separated us 
after all, one from another and both in Christ. The General Con- 
ference should suddenly recess for one-half hour, not this afternoon, 
to walk a hundred yards out that door. Around the corner over there 
neatly tucked away is the Buttermilk Bottom which our chairman 
has just referred to. Here is one of the worst inner-city ghettos in 
the deep South, neatly tucked away just out of sight but visible from 
our Methodist headquarters I am sure. 

The Fund for Reconciliation and the Board of Missions on the 
national level did provide a little community action, but even now 
that money is dried up. The community is frustrated; drug addicts 
are right here. People who drink are right here, and the ministry of 
the church and all of its grandeur pompously passes beside them. The 
United Methodist Church headquarters here in Georgia overlooks 
Buttermilk Bottom so close, yet so far away. 

The quadrennium about to begin cannot escape witnessing a mas- 
sive resurgence of darker peoples. Wesley's slogan, "The world is my 
parish," has deep implications for people of color, and we need to 
understand this. Taking the world view, the American numerical 
majority constitutes a clear minority on the worldwide scene. Con- 
sequently, American majority opinions and techniques must be sub- 
jected to a world court for justice. The darker people must have our 
day, for we know that the whole creation groans and travails in pain 
until now. And not only they, but we as black people and darker people 
also who have the first fruits of the Spirt — either we ourselves 
groan within ourselves, waiting for adoption as his true son, for we 
are saved by hope, but hope that is seen is not hope for what a man 
sees, for what a man sees, why does he hope for it? 

But, if we hope for that which we do not see, then we wait for it 
in patience. The darker peoples of the earth have been waiting in 
patience for 400 years or more. Today we wait upon The United Meth- 
odist Church's General Conference to continue to point 11 million or 
more Methodists in the direction of understanding and uplifting the 
poor, the outcast, the downtrodden, the cruel victims of institutional 
racism. We wait, but you have the power to act in a manner which will 
halt our irresponsible investment policies, especially those which 
undermine Zimbabwe, Bishop Muzorewa, and Angola. The delegates 
from Angola who are here at this General Conference, I'm sure, 
would appreciate a lot more support from this church other than just 
interpreters — those from Mozambique and South Africa. We wait, but 
you have the power to equalize pensions and salaries throughout the 
church. We wait, but you have the power to adopt a new social creed 
as has been presented, which points the church in a new direction. 



266 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

We wait, but you have the power to put the total shoulder of the 
church toward a massive and educational and economic support of 
black people. We wait, but you have the power. So we are patient. 
We're waiting for adoption. 

The Structure Study Commission Report represents an incredible 
amount of work being done by a Commission, commissioned by the 
1968 General Conference, working hard for four years. We recognize 
this. The Commission has worked hard. But its work has been 
tarnished greatly by persons within the church who are hell-bent 
on perpetuating the status quo or moving backward by so centralizing 
the bureaucracy of the church that no room for creative inbreakings 
are left. Indeed, even the Holy Ghost would be accountable to the 
structures, if this report is adopted. 

Brothers and Sisters of the church, let us not waste time here in 
Atlanta. Do not pretend to be concerned over the plight of people 
who hurt, while all the while spending most of your time reshuffling 
the structures of the church. Let us deal first with the weighty 
matters of the Christian church, deal with the demands of the Black 
Methodists for Church Renewal, the demands of the American In- 
dians, the demands of the Asians, the demands of the Spanish- 
Americans, the demands of the women, the demands of the youth, 
the demands of the youth and young adults of the church; and then, 
united, let us try to figure out the best structure which will enable us 
all together to deal with these concerns most responsibly. 

The cart before the horse hurts the horse's forelegs. Ours is a collec- 
tive groan and call for renewal. We must struggle to break open old 
criteria, old values, old ways of doing things which do not speak to 
our needs in these times. The church can so often claim to read the 
signs of the heavens, but seldom do we really take time to read the 
signs of the times. We plead, we demand, we request, respectfully, 
we admonish, we urge fervently, that you deal, in any kind of lan- 
guage, first with our petitions and resolutions, with the concerns of 
the so-called special interest groups which are here. In so doing you 
might enable The United Methodist Church to find itself despite 
itself, a new church for a new world. 

Announcements 

J. Wesley Hole (Secretary) made announcements. 

Benediction 

Bishop Pedro Zottele gave the benediction in Spanish, 
and the morning session adjourned. 



SECOND DAY, MONDAY, APRIL 17, 1972 
AFTERNOON SESSION 

Opening — Bishop James K. Mathews 

Pursuant to adjournment, the General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church convened in the afternoon session 
of Monday, April 17, 1972, at 2:30 p.m. in the Civic Center, 
Atlanta, Georgia, with Bishop James K. Mathews, Boston 
Area, presiding. 

The Conference sang the hymn, "Come Thou Almighty 
King," and was led in prayer by Dr. Eric Baker (Great 
Britain) . 

Resolution 

John B. Howes (Central Pennsylvania) asked to intro- 
duce a resolution having to do with Earth Week. The Chair 
stated that it would have to be referred to the Committee on 
Agenda. 

Motion — Black Representation in Memphis Conference Dele- 
gation 

Mrs. William T. Roberts (Tennessee) stated that the 
Memphis Annual Conference was the only merged Annual 
Conference which had elected no black delegates to this 
General Conference. She moved that one black lay person 
and one black clergy person of the Memphis Conference 
be seated in this General Conference with voice but without 
vote. The motion was adopted. 

Committee on Agenda 

/. Otis Young: Mr. Chairman, the Agenda Committee concurs 
in the recommendation of this Conference, and we deal with the 
major item which was referred to this Conference for the afternoon 
session. We would also like to recommend that should you conclude 
with this item in time for any one of the other major reports, it may 
be heard during this Plenary Session. May I remind you that there 
are three major reports scheduled for tomorrow morning, and one of 
those if possible might be heard this afternoon — one of Doctrine and 
Doctrinal Standards, one of Social Principles and the other on the 
Study of the Ministry. We would further recommend in keeping with 
your actions this morning that the Legislative Committees meet this 
evening for organization at 7:30 at St. Marks United Methodist 
Church. 

Bishop Mathews: You have heard the words of this Committee; 
what is your pleasure? Is there a motion for adoption of these pro- 
posals? And it is seconded. Any discussion. If not, if you'll approve 
the recommendation of the Agenda Committee with regard to pro- 
cedure this afternoon and evening, lift a hand. Opposed the same 
sign. And it is done. 

267 



268 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Procedural Motion 

R. Jervis Cooke (Peninsula) : In order to insure full and free 
debate on issues related to structure, I move that we suspend the 
rules and for one hour engage in debate on the issue of structure, 
and further, that at the end of the hour we reconsider whether to 
renew the debate for an additional hour, at the end of which we 
would return to the Structure Study Commission for motions of 
referral or disposition of the report. 

Now sir, I meant in here to say that during this period of time 
we would not have any motion on this; it would be a matter of debate 
without motion. If I have a second, I'd like to speak very briefly. 

Mr. Cooke spoke in favor of his motion. G. Lemuel Fenn 
(Oklahoma) asked a question about the precedence of mo- 
tions at the end of the discussion period. Wendell P. C. 
Taylor (Mississippi-FCJ) asked whether the motion in- 
cluded a time limit on individual speakers. The Chair in- 
dicated that with no limit specified in the motion the regular 
limit would apply. Mr. Taylor moved to amend the main 
motion to provide for a five-minute limit on each speaker. 
Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) spoke in opposition to the 
amendment. The Chair stated that any time limit voted 
would not apply to Albert Outler (North Texas), who had 
been granted ten minutes by conference action. Dr. Outler 
stated that he did not wish to be the object of any special 
privilege. The Chair called for the vote on the amendment, 
and it failed. 

The main motion was put to the vote, and it was ruled 
that it prevailed by the required two-thirds majority. 

Statement in Opposition to Structure Study Commission 
Report— Albert C. Outler 

Forest W. Laraba (New Hampshire) asked that Dr. 
Outler make his statement at this time. After introductory 
remarks. Dr. Outler listed his objections to the Structure 
Study Commission report. 

Albert C. Outler (North Texas) : Here are the demerits listed under 
seven heads without any development: 

1. It is far too complex and cumbersome. 

2. The scheme is excessively centralized. In it, as in the Roman 
Church before Vatican II, the basic model is the pyramid, power and 
program coming down from above and permeating the basic mass 
as far as promotion can manage that. This seems to me to be directly 
contrary to the most advanced and effective concept of management 
by objective in modern management theory. 

3. This scheme would reduce the General Conference chiefly to a 
quadrennial assemblage for review, review of policies, programs and 
proposals from the Council on Ministries and the boards and agencies 
with the obvious alternative of taking those recommendations or of 
an occasional revolt and overthrow. This alters the prime function 
of the General Conference, and it seems to me would be a far-reaching 
and retrograde step. 



The United Methodist Church 269 

4. The scheme, also, reduces the status and role of the Annual 
Conferences largely to one of reaction, accepting policies and pro- 
grams from above, filling out quotas of various sorts, quotas having 
to do with rotation, sex, lay, clergy, ethnics, E.U.B.'s, youth, etc., etc. 

5. The scheme envisages three interlocking power complexes: the 
Council on Ministries, the Council on Finance and Administration, 
and the Council of Bishops. Each of these would be a power group 
controlled by an inner power group, that is to say their executive 
committees, and only the Council of Bishops would be composed of 
voting members who work full time in these particular jobs. The 
other two would be policy making groups of elected persons serving 
voluntarily and on marginal time, and they would inevitably become 
dependent upon their staff. 

The Commission thinks that this would be a good thing. I think 
that it would be a bad thing. The obvious and inevitable result 
would be an even more completely staff-dominated church than we 
have now, for the Commission on Ministries and the C.F.A. would 
in turn tend to dominate the General Conference, it would tend 
to dominate the Annual Conferences and the local churches. 

6. The scheme is governed by two operational principles that are 
valid enough in themselves under some circumstances, but which 
would almost surely work out badly in practice in these circumstances 
as they are envisaged in this report. Number one, the quota system. 
There are so many categories and so few places, and yet not all 
the categories that are eligible and justified are specified and laid 
out. But there are so many categories and so few places to be filled 
comparatively speaking, the combinations of experience, expertise, 
and available time would be so rare that persons with all the requisite 
talents would wield undue influence in the typical quota-fUled group. 
Two, the rotation system. This would tend to inhibit the acquisition 
of significant experience and expertise, not only in the persons elected 
from annual and jurisdictional conferences — a layman this quadi'en- 
nium, a laywoman next, an elder in full connection the next — but 
even in staff personnel as well. Few persons in their lifetime might 
expect to represent the whole church in any top quality role for 
longer than eight years. Many would have no more than a single 
quadrennium; most would have to find their glory in the sun in 
their annual and charge conferences, groups that had been sadly 
degraded in influence and honor. 

7. As an overall consequence I would judge that this proposed 
structure would make The United Methodist Church the most cen- 
tralized and "curialized" structure in Christendom bar none. And 
I am as you know a veteran Roman Catholic watcher. And this in 
a church whose members are beginning to discover that they belong 
to a voluntary association, that has no really effective power to tax 
or to excommunicate; whose programs are invariably expensive and 
ideological often without being worth what they cost; and finally 
that the pyramid is no longer the most viable model of institutional 
organization in the modern world. From this I draw an inference 
that does not even begin to approach a motion now, because my 
main concern is that this shall be discussed in this body as a whole 
before it is referred — referred to the committees or the Committee 
on Reference, or however it is referred. 

My inference is that not because any of us is satisfied with the 
status quo, not anyone in this room I think, but because this particular 
structural reform would actually tend to reinforce the constrictive 
features in our present structures even with the best intent to open 
them up, and would not fulfill our own best intentions as a demo- 
cratic church — that we ought, after full discussion, including the 
right of legislative committees to concur or not to concur, we should 



270 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

table this report and all its minutes and documentations, plus the 
full record of its discussion in the Conference and in the whole church, 
be referred to a reconstituted successor commission with a mandate 
that will include at the very least the commendation of a radically- 
different approach to the problems of church structure and polity, 
namely structures as support systems and no more than support 
systems governed by such principles as: 

1) Local initiative 

2) Subsidiarity 

3) Decentralization 

4) CoUegiality 

5) Enlistment of all available talent 

6) Inclusiveness 

7) Ecumenical outreach and cooperation 

8) Etc., etc., etc., 

Statement Opposing Report — W. Astor Kirk 

Charles A. Say re (Southern New Jersey) requested that 
the privilege of the floor be granted to W. Astor Kirk, a 
reserve delegate and vice-chairman of the Structure Study- 
Commission. The privilege was granted. 

W. Astor Kirk (Southern New Jersey) : First of all, I think it is 
important for this body to recognize what it is that we are talking 
about, and because I wasn't quite sure in my own mind that it didn't 
though — that the Commission had recognized this — I found it neces- 
sary to dissent. We have a connectional Church, a connectional de- 
nomination, and I think it is important for this General Conference, 
as indeed I thought it was important for the Commission, to identify 
those policies, programs, activities that are necessary to be conducted 
on a denomination-wide basis in order to maintain our connec- 
tionalism, and those things that are not necessary. Those policies, 
programs that are not necessary to be conducted on a denomination- 
wide basis ought to be left elsewhere rather than being projected 
at the national level. Our report unfortunately does not draw this 
kind of distinction for your consideration here. 

Secondly, I think it is important for the General Conference to 
recognize that we are not talking about the totality of structure 
within The United Methodist Church. We are not talking about or 
at least we did not have the responsibility to deal with all of the 
patterns of interaction and institutionalized interrelationships among 
individuals and groups of individuals but only that part of the 
structure of The United Methodist Church which has to do with 
the general boards and agencies. Some of the things that Dr. Outler 
said a moment ago seemed to imply that there are those who think 
that we have to talk about the whole of structure. Our focus is on 
the general board and agency structure of the denomination. I found 
it necessary to dissent because I did not think that we as a Commis- 
sion drew this kind of distinction, and a part of the confusion, I 
think in the General Conference and throughout the church, is that 
there are people who have been talking as if we are out to restructure 
the entire denomination, and that's not what we are all about. Because 
that was not clearly felt out I found it regrettable that I couldn't 
associate myself with the report. 

Thirdly, we do have the problem of accountability, the problem of 
responsiveness, the problem of insuring that policies are made by 
the General Conference and then are carried out by the administrative 
bodies. The third reason why I found myself in disagreement is that 



The United Methodist Church 271 

the report does not make that distinction, and many of you here may 
not make that distinction. The General Conference in my view is the 
ultimate policy-making body, the ultimate kind of legislative body 
within the denomination. All the other units within the denomination 
at the general board and agency level are administrative bodies, so 
far as I can see it, and have the responsibility of carrying out the 
policy of the General Conference in a manner that is effective, 
efficient, responsible, and accountable. It was not clear to me that 
we drew this kind of distinction in our Commission report. 

Fourthly, we introduced some concepts that I had hoped we would 
have been able to have dealt with in terms of the implication of 
those concepts much more fully than we did. I welcome the privilege 
this afternoon of this General Conference dealing with those concepts. 
I would not agree that power is necessarily a bad thing, but power 
becomes a bad thing when it is not responsible, when it is not ac- 
countable, when it is not responsive. And I think you will want to 
deal with that sort of thing this afternoon. 

Finally, I am committed to the concept that the Commission has 
in tei-ms of somebody that will deal with problems that arise — 
policy problems that arise between General Conference, and therefore 
the concept of the Council on Ministries appeals to me, but I find 
myself in serious disagreement — one, in terms of the composition of 
that body, because I view that body as a kind of policy-making 
body, and if it is going to be a policy-making body I firmly think 
it ought to be representative of the General Conference that creates 
it; and I find myself in some disagreement with my friends and 
colleagues on the Commission in terms of the constitution of the 
body. Secondly, I find myself in some disagreement in terms of how 
the members of that body should be selected. I think the method that 
we have finally hit upon in the Commission does lend itself to a lot 
of confusion, and I think it should be rethought. These basically 
are the general notions that led me to, after much prayerful thought, 
after much consideration, to arrive at the decision that I could not 
in good conscience support it. 

Gordon G. Thonpson, Jr. (North Georgia) spoke in be- 
half of the report. 

Statement Opposing Report — Franklin Blackstone, Jr. 

Franklin Blackstone, Jr. (Western Pennsylvania) : I would like 
to speak in general opposition to the report, but with some items 
of considerable approval. I share the views of the gentleman who 
just sat down that one of the best things about this report is the 
consternation by some of the bureaucratic hierarchy of the church 
about its possible adoption. But apart from that, there are, I think, 
a couple of serious mistakes of judgment that the Commission has 
made in its attempt to reach a desirable and devoutly to-be-hoped-for 
goal. I'd like to just deal with three. 

The first is the matter of categories and quotas. I think that in 
the days gone by it has been essential for certain under-represented, 
organized and unorganized kinds of people to be guaranteed that 
their voice would be heard. But what the Structure Commission has 
done, it seems to me, is to reduce to absurdity that valid and impor- 
tant consideration. I think we can find ourselves having representa- 
tives from the most minute kind of personage and perhaps even, to 
continue this to a ridiculous extreme, that maybe the British delega- 
tion who are here ought to have some representation too. 

Item two — in the choice of the four major boards remaining, I think 
the Structure Commission has kind of tipped the scales in one 



272 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

direction in its consideration of the totality of the Gospel. As I see 
what the Lord has asked us to do, he has asked us, first of all, to 
save men, to lead them to a new life in Christ, and, second, to 
improve their lot in life. But we find in this structure two of the 
major boards concerned with the improvement of the lot, a part of 
one with the matter of what we might call, for lack of a better 
word, the redemptive evangelical outlook, and, of course, one with 
the professional ministry. I think that's a mistake. 

Finally, and the most important thing, as I see it, is the failure 
to distinguish, by the Structure Commission, of the difference between 
legislative and administrative power. What the Structure Committee 
has done, it seems to me, is to create a legislative body and tell it 
it is to administer, it is to administer administrative power. Now 
it is totally impossible for a group of 220 people, of whatever kind, 
caliber, quality in makeup, to direct the administration of anything. 
This is particularly true when the rotation that is required would 
be added to it. 

I don't know how many of you are here at a General Conference 
for the first time, but when I came to my first General Conference 
four years ago, after having been active in an Annual Conference 
for almost fifteen years, it was with considerable fear and trepidation 
and wonder. And I'm not really the sort of person that wonders 
about very much. But when we ask people from the church-at-large 
to come and participate in boards like the Council on Ministries for 
a four-year term, we are participating, I submit, in a bogus democracy 
that gives the appearance of participation, but can only have the 
effect of strengthening the hand of the professional staff or the 
full-time person in charge. I speak, therefore, for a consideration of 
these factors. Whether this requires us to reconsider this matter at 
another session or whether these problems can be dealt with, time 
will tell, but to adopt it in its present form, I think, would be an 
invitation to disaster. 

Statement Supporting Report — Will M. Hildebrand 

Will M. Hildebrand (Southern California-Arizona): I have a posi- 
tion just about the opposite of the man who spoke before and yet 
a great deal of fellow feeling for him in that I speak on behalf of 
the report with a great many reservations about it. He ... I speak 
on behalf of the report because T believe we are in need of some 
restructuring. I think the thoughtful restructuring of the boards is 
a creative step forward. I think the Board of Discipleship can be 
a very exciting thing for the life of the church and spark us in our 
worship, in our evangelism, in the whole enterprise of discipleship 
and therefore speak warmly and enthusiastically for them. 

I believe that the Board of Global Ministries is a firm step forward 
in terms of the emerging concept of mission, and I am grateful that 
there has been such serious dialogue between the Board of Missions 
and the Structure Commission which has allowed that to evolve. My 
reservation is at the point of the Council on Ministries — its monitoring 
function. It asks us to be better people than we are, it seems to me. 
And that at the same time, it demeans the boards and does not allow 
us to be as good as we are and that it is in this respect that I think 
it is fundamentally a misreading of what man is and what our job 
is together. 

I don't want one group, either the Council of Bishops or the 
Council on Ministries, any one group monitoring all the rest of the 
church. I find it really rather abhorrent, and I don't think it's neces- 
sary. I have faith in this church and its multiple work. I think they 
have overrated accountability and underrated faithfulness and 



The United Methodist Church 273 

brotherhood in the church which is ours and therefore am really quite 
critical at that point. 

However, unlike Dr. Outler I sure hope this isn't going to be 
referred four years hence — four years of looking at what our struc- 
ture is going to be like. I would rather that we address ourselves to 
it seriously and in our legislative groups take what steps seem wise 
to these legislative groups and shaping it up, but using it as a basic 
document from which we move out of this General Conference. 

Statement from Commission Representative Requested 

Robert W. Burtner (Oregon-Idaho) asked that a member 
of the Structure Study Commission comment on how checks 
and balances on power are provided in the Commission 
proposal. Dow Kirkpatrick (Northern Illinois) responded 
on behalf of the Commission. He stated that every power 
proposed for the Council on Ministries was being exercised 
somewhere in the church, and the Commission's proposal 
would bring them together in a forum that would be visible 
and responsive. He stated further that the power of the 
Council on Ministries would be checked by the Annual Con- 
ferences through their representation on it. He also noted 
that there was a new check on power in the budgeting 
process, since both the Council on Ministries and the Council 
on Finance and Administration were to be involved in it. 

Statement Opposing Report — Benjamin R. Oliphint 

Benjamin R. Oliphint: (Louisiana) : Mr. Chairman, I would like 
to speak for a moment about the relation of the local church and 
the program boards. It seems to me that the local church is where 
it's at and where it's going to be. The local church is concerned for 
several things — two, specifically. I think first of all you need clear 
visibility for resourcing the concerns of the local church. I do not 
see this reflected in the program boards. In other words, I think, 
Mr. Chairman, when you need help in education, you need a Board 
of Education to go to get help. It needs to be that clear. 

I think the second thing that comes from the experience of the 
local church is that we have a variety of people in local churches. 
And that variety of people and their concerns and interests should 
be upheld and strengthened by this plan. I think that when we take 
some of the concerns and shove them down and make them into one 
board, we there undo the balance that we need in the local church. 
We have a vast audience of people in the local church with many 
interests. We need to recognize that and serve those interests to 
bring them together. I think that these two things are very impor- 
tant. I don't think that the program board structure does either of 
these things. 

John B. Warman (Western Pennsylvania) spoke in op- 
position to the report and in favor of continuing the Pro- 
gram Council as an alternative to the proposed Council on 
Ministries. 



274 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Statement Supporting Report — D. Clifford Crummey 

Hamilton T. Bostvell (California-Nevada) asked that the 
privilege of the floor be granted to D. Clifford CrummeT/, 
a reserve delegate and member of the Structure Study Com- 
mission. The privilege v^as granted. 

D. Clifford Crummey (California-Nevada) : I want to speak briefly 
as a member of the Structure Study Commission, but I would like 
to also say that I'm one of those who after twelve years in administra- 
tive work, have asked my bishop for appointment to a local church 
this year. The reason is that I agree with what's been said over and 
over again that in the local church is where it's at. And unless we 
have a church that can be responsive to the life of people, abroad, 
across Methodism, in the local church as its expression, we haven't 
got a workable plan. But I'm convinced that this Structure Study 
Commission Report is a responsible and responsive system that fits 
together. It has the checks and balances which are necessary. 

The question of power was just raised. We spent long hours and 
called in experts, talked with the bishops, and talked with various 
boards and agencies and persons about this subject, and I think we 
have a distribution of power that will make it possible for us to 
work in this church. I believe that it opens the flow from top to 
bottom, entirely contrary to what Dr. Outler said, to flow both ways. 
There's nothing in the plan that says everything has to come from 
the top down. Really, it ought to come the other direction. I think 
something like the Council on Ministries is necessary. Several of 
those who have spoken in opposition today, and some who spoke in 
opposition last night, have said to me, "Something like this is neces- 
sary." So, let's find a way and means of making it what we want 
as a General Conference. 

The boards and agencies need revision from present forms; in 
fact, you've asked for it in many ways and forms in the General 
Conferences of Dallas and Kansas City ... St. Louis. And ours is 
a most plausible and possible one. Certain parts of it really need to 
be adopted by this General Conference, if not all of it. I hope that you 
will pay attention to how we have designed the boards and agencies, 
because this has been done carefully, and I think Dr. Hildebrand 
said most of the things I would have said here. But, lastly, I would 
ask the Conference to receive the report and refer it in such a way 
that it can have full and sufficient hearing so that what you want 
to happen really happens, and this report becomes a means by which 
you can make it happen. It is a document which is worthy of your 
consideration and study. Thank you. 

Statement Opposing Report — John E. Stumbo 

John E. Stumbo (Kansas East) : I rise to speak in opposition to the 
report. I do not wish to repeat anything that's been said, but one thing 
that I've not heard that concerns me about this report, I feel inclined 
to speak about. I'm a layman and as such my church work is my 
avocation, if you please. That is, I have to earn a living. 

One of the things that concerns me about this report is that I'm 
very strongly committed, that the church in the future must ac- 
commodate the layman and his power and his ability to act and make 
decisions. And I do not think that this report accommodates the 
concept of lay-empowerment at the local church and Annual Con- 
ference level. I think it's important to realize that the layman must 
take a portion of his leisure time, if you will, and devote it to the 
church. It therefore becomes incumbent that we develop a system and 



The United Methodist Church 275 

a structure which most easily accommodates that layman in his at- 
tempt to become an effective power-based opinion and resource in our 
chui'ch. Because if we create a structure that ignores that layman, 
we'll lose our church. Thank you. 

Victor C. Vinluan (Northwest Philippines) spoke in sup- 
port of the report, stating that it would give more recogni- 
tion and participation to those parts of the church outside 
the United States. 

Suggestion Concerning Procedure — Leonard D. Slutz 

Leonard D. Slutz (West Ohio) suggested that as soon as 
possible the report should be referred to the appropriate 
legislative committees in order that they might begin work 
on it. He expressed the opinion that many sections of the 
report would be found to be relatively noncontroversial, and 
that the others could be considered in a more orderly 
fashion if they were presented in the form of majority and 
minority reports from the legislative committees. He sug- 
gested further that the Structure Study Commission recon- 
sider its plan to refer the report in its entirety to all legis- 
lative committees and instead allow the General Conference 
to arrive freely at its own decision about how to proceed 
with the consideration of the report. 

Statement Opposing Report — Harold A. Bosley 

Harold Bosley (New York) : I think the suggestion which was just 
made by Leonard Slutz as an umbrella suggestion is the one that I 
would like to associate myself with without any hesitation. There are 
two matters in this proposed structure that I am sure our legislative 
committees will want to concern themselves with. One is the word 
"caucus." 

Now the word "caucus" is as vague as caucus itself is a real fact. 
There is no provision for caucus in the Discipline ; there is no provi- 
sion for caucus in legislation. I suggest that it is absolutely necessary 
for us now when caucuses are so much a real part of our life to ask 
some legislative committee to draw up some understanding between a 
caucus and a conference and a committee. It seems to me of great 
importance that this be done, done as carefully as possible. We can 
have two competing caucuses asking for representation; what then 
will the Nominating Committee do? 

It seems to me that this is a matter we must concern ourselves with. 
But one that I am even more concerned about than that that's a long 
range one, is to be found on page 15 of the report, paragraph 830. 
Now if as has been suggested, that all of these powers exist in the 
Discipline at the present time but they are scattered around, that's 
news to me about some of these. It could be a very real fact though. 

I'm concerned very much about this sentence that begins on page 
16, this line 16: "This power shall not include the power to change 
provisions of the Discipline which established a general board and 
its purpose but shall include the power to approve changes in the 
internal structure of a board and to approve transfer of functions 
among boards on the recommendation of the board or boards involved 
subject to the ratification by the following General Conference." 



276 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Now this as I understand it gives the General Conference the power 
to create a board and the Council on Ministries the power to gut 
that board, and to do it subject to the ratification of the next General 
Conference. 

It seems to me we are faced then with the necessity, if this is 
necessary, if emergencies as we have it listed at point 2 at the bottom 
of page 15, if emergencies arise, if other significant events within 
a quadrennium arise which substantially affect the life of a church 
that requires this, if this is our anticipation of the future which 
we face, then I suggest Mr. Chairman, we ought to think seriously 
about having General Conferences every two years, much as I am 
startled by that prospect. 

I am convinced that this places too much power in the hands of the 
Council on Ministries. We create a board, but they can gut a board; 
and boards can shuffle responsibilities among themselves. If this is 
necessary, then I think it is necessary for the General Conference to 
rethink the time of its meeting. 

Mrs. Thomas DeVaux (Western Pennsylvania) spoke 
in favor of retaining the present structure, on grounds that 
it had not been given a fair chance since merger. 

Motion to Extend Time for Debate 

The Chair noted that the hour set aside for debate had 
expired. Jesse R. DeWitt (Detroit) moved that the debate 
be extended for an additional thirty minutes. The motion 
failed to get the required two-thirds majority. 

Procedural Motions — Richard W. Cain 

The Chair recognized Richard W. Cain (Southern Cali- 
fornia-Arizona) for the purpose of presenting procedural 
motions on behalf of the Structure Study Commission. 

Richard W. Cain (Southern California- Arizona) : Mr. Chairman, 
I move that all members and staff of the Structure Study Commission 
be granted privilege to speak when the report is before the Con- 
ference or in legislative committees, without vote. 

Harold Fag an (Texas) spoke in opposition to the motion. 
The motion was adopted. 

Mr. Cain: Mr. Chairman, and members of the Conference, I move 
in behalf of the commission that the rules be suspended by a two- 
thirds vote for the purpose of a motion to refer the Structure Study 
Commission Report in its totality to each of the fourteen legislative 
committees. 

David A. Duck (South Georgia) asked a question re- 
garding procedure if the motion failed. The Chair stated 
that the report would then be referred to legislative com- 
mittees by sections under the regular rules of the Confer- 
ence. Richard 0. Johnson (California-Nevada) asked 
whether, if the motion to suspend the rules passed, the mo- 
tion to refer could then be debated. The chair stated that the 
motion of reference would be debatable as to what is re- 



The United Methodist Church 277 

ferred and the terms of reference. Richard D. Tholin 
(Northern Illinois) asked which legislative committees 
would consider the first three sections of the report under 
the regular rules of the Conference. The chair stated that 
this would be determined by the Committee on Reference. 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) asked how the Structure Study- 
Commission planned to correlate reports from the fourteen 
different legislative committees if their plan of referral was 
adopted. The Chair stated that this would be determined by 
one of the standing administrative committees of the Con- 
ference. 

The motion to suspend the rules was put to a vote, and 
it did not pass. 

Alva H. Clark (Nebraska) moved that Paragraph 801 of 
the Structure Study Commission Report be referred to all 
legislative committees, and that when this paragraph had 
been acted upon by the General Conference, the remainder 
of the report be referred under the regular rules of the 
Conference. Franklin Blackstone, Jr. (Western Pennsyl- 
vania) raised a point of order. The Chair ruled that the 
point of order was not well taken. George L. Poor (Pacific 
Northwest) raised a point of order that since the entire 
report had already been referred, Mr. Clark's motion to 
refer a portion of it was out of order. The Chair sustained 
the point of order and ruled that Mr. Clark's motion was 
not in order. 

Raoul C. Calkins (West Ohio) attempted to present a 
procedural motion, but the Chair ruled that his motion 
was not in order. 

Melvin M. Finkbeiner (Pacific Northwest) asked if the 
Committee on Reference had determined how the Structure 
Study Commission Report would be referred to the several 
legislative committees. Jerry G. Bray (Virginia), chairman 
of the Committee on Reference, indicated that a tentative 
assignment had been made. The Chair ruled that the report 
of this committee would not be heard at this time. 

Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin) raised a point of order; the 
Chair ruled that it was not well taken. Jane Arterburn 
(Louisville) raised a point of order; the Chair ruled that it 
was not well taken. John C. Satterfield (Mississippi) stated 
that in his judgment the ruling of the Chair was correct. 

Theological Study Commission Report Deferred 

Tom Reavley (Southwest Texas), speaking in behalf of 
the Theological Study Commission on Doctrine and Doc- 
trinal Standards, asked that the Conference defer hearing 
the Commission report until the Tuesday morning session. 
A vote was taken, and the report was deferred. Paid J. Bee- 
man (Pacific Northwest) asked to see the vote again. The 



278 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

motion to defer the report was put to a vote again, and the 
Chair ruled that it prevailed. 

Announcements 

Announcements were given by the Secretary, J. Wesley 
Hole. D. W. Brooks (North Georgia) gave directions for 
reaching St. Mark's United Methodist Church, where legis- 
lative committee sessions were to be held. 

Benediction 

The benediction was pronounced by Bishop Frederick B. 
Newell (retired). 



THIRD DAY, TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1972 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening — Bishop W. McFerrin Stowe 

Pursuant to adjournment, the General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church convened in the morning session 
of the third day, Tuesday, April 18, 1972, at 8 :30 a.m. in 
the Civic Center, Atlanta, Georgia, v^ith Bishop W. McFer- 
rin Stowe, Kansas Area, presiding. 

Devotions 

Dorothy McConnell (New York) served as the liturgist. 
The Conference sang Hymn No. 464, "See How Great a 
Flame Aspires"; Acts 3:15-17 and Romans 8:18-25 were 
read. Bishop Lloyd C. Wicke, New York Area, spoke on the 
subject, "What Are Your Expectations?" (see page 725). 
Hymn No. 153, "God of Love and God of Power," was sung, 
and Bishop Wicke gave the benediction. The liturgy was 
created by Jeanne Audrey Powers (Minnesota) . 

Choral selections were presented by the Concert Choir 
of Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pennsylvania, under 
the direction of Pierce Getz. 

Committee on Journal 

George R. Akers (Wyoming) reported that the Commit- 
tee on Journal had reviewed the Journal of the opening 
sessions of the Conference and found it in good order. The 
report was received. 

Committee on Agenda 

The agenda as printed in the Daily Christian Advocate 
was presented to the Conference by J. Otis Young, chair- 
man of the Committee on Agenda. It was adopted. 

Committee on Credentials 

W. T. Handy: Mr. Chairman, members of the General Conference, 
the Committee on Credentials in response to your referral yesterday, 
recommends that twenty United Methodist seminarians be seated at 
this General Conference with voice and without vote. One delegate 
shall be selected from each of the fourteen United Methodist sem- 
inaries and six at large. The latter category will provide for the 
representation of United Methodist seminarians from non-United 
Methodist theological schools. I so move. 

Bishop Stowe: This comes to us as a recommendation from this 
committee. Therefore, it is properly before us. Do you have any 
questions or any discussion? Are you ready to vote? If you would 

279 



280 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

approve this recommendation, would you let it be known by the 
raising of the hand. Opposed, by the same sign. It is approved. 

Nominations — Bishop Roy H. Short 

The Chair recognized Bishop Roy H. Short, Secretary of 
the Council of Bishops, who presented nominations from 
the Council of Bishops. The following persons were nomi- 
nated to serve as members of the Commission on Entertain- 
ment and Program for a term of eight years to expire in 
1980: Daniel L. Shearer (Central Pennsylvania), W. Scott 
Bozeman (Florida), Norma Larson (Minnesota), Carl C. 
Hall (Little Rock), Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) 
DeWayne S. Woodring (East Ohio), and Anderson C. Epps 
(North Georgia). In addition the nomination of Grantas E. 
Hoopert (Central Pennsylvania) was submitted as a substi- 
tute for Daniel Shearer as a member of the Committee on 
Courtesies and Privileges. 

Those nominated were elected. 

Committee Reports 

The Chair recognized Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific North- 
west), who stated that the Committee on Courtesies and 
Privileges had no report. 

Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) reported on behalf of 
the Committee on Presiding Officers that Bishop Roy C. 
Nichols, Pittsburgh Area, would preside at the Wednesday 
morning session. 

Theological Study Commission on Doctrine and Doctrinal 
Standards (see page 1988) 

The Chair recognized Albert C. Outler (North Texas), 
chairman of the Commission, for the presentation of the 
report. Dr. Outler introduced the members of the Commis- 
sion and consultants who had worked with it. 

He noted that the report was being proposed as a replace- 
ment for the existing Part II of The Book of Discipline 
and outlined the procedure the Commission proposed to fol- 
low in presenting the report. He asked, on behalf of the 
Commission, that the report then be considered by the Con- 
ference as soon as the Agenda Committee could schedule 
time for such consideration. 

He then proceeded with the presentation of the report. 

Dr. Outler: The most obvious feature of this report is what it is 
not. It is not a new creed, nor a new set of Articles of Religion, 
nor a Confession of Faith, nor a new set of General Rxdes. The old 
ones are still retained, in the middle of our text, in their original 
versions. This is by design, or course, for the next most obvious 
thing about the report is that it is not a simple reaffirmation of the 



The United Methodist Church 281 

old Part II, either. The old Articles, and Confession and Rules have 
been set in a new context of interpretation, and this means a deci- 
sive change in their role in the theological enterprise in The United 
Methodist Church. 

Now this calls for an explanation, and any such explanation would 
have to begin with a reference to our mandate from the General 
Conference of 1968 (^ 1419) : 

". . . to bring to the General Conference of 1972 a progress 
report concerning "Doctrine and Doctrinal Standards" in the United 
Methodist Church. If the Commission deems it advisable," said 
that mandate, "it may undertake the preparation of a contemporary 
formulation of doctrine and belief, in supplementation to all an- 
tecedent formulations. . ." 

To many in that Conference and throughout tlie church this meant 
a new creed or something like that. In the beginning, we were some- 
times referred to as "the new Creedal Commission." And, of course, 
we did consider that possibility: a new creed, a new confession of 
faith, a new doctrinal summary and affirmation. In fact, one of the 
general work assignments for the Commission as a whole was the 
production of experimental forms of creeds and liturgical affirmation 
and doctrinal summary — not one but many — and this turned up three 
or four texts of truly high quality that deserve to be published 
and used throughout the church. 

We are certainly, therefore, not against creed-making. Our con- 
cern however is not with a single creed but with the guidelines 
that should be followed in any given case of ci'eed-making and the 
claims that any given creed or summary might be able to make to 
have authority in The United Methodist Church or among United 
Methodist people. But one of the earliest decisions that emerged in 
our exploratory discussions was that a single creed, displacing the 
two that we have now, whatever its form or quality, that claimed 
any sort of official monopoly in the church would not really serve the 
cause of theological renewal, or for that matter of theological clarity. 
Doctrinal confusion cannot be overcome by official dogmatic pro- 
nouncement. There is something profoundly self-deceiving in the as- 
sumption that valid authority in disputed question can ever flo\y from 
their majority vote in the General Conferences. Such majorities 
weaken rather than strengthen a church's real authority. A better 
way, we came to realize, was to strike for a new understanding of 
the problems of the norms and the normative in theology and ethics 
and then to seek for a clearer vision of our doctrinal heritage as a 
resource for solving these problems of norms and the normative. 
This is not a cop-out. It is instead the acknowledgement of three 
decisive factors affecting our current situation in The United Meth- 
odist Church and in the Christian world everywhere. 

To begin with there is no denying the fact that our United Meth- 
odist ways with doctrine has always been more emotive and practical 
than dogmatic and speculative. We have tended to value doctrine 
for its effective service in the evangelistic and nurturing tasks of 
the church even as we have also tended to define the church herself 
in terms of mission rather than of form. This, in an age of con- 
fusion like ours, has made for a bewildering spectrum of doctrinal 
diversity within The United Methodist Church, in our official litera- 
ture and various public pronouncements in our seminaries, pulpits, 
pews and in our public lobbies as well. 

Somewhere in The United Methodist Church there is somebody 
urging every kind of theology still alive and not a few that are dead, 
but your commission came to realize that this appai-ent bedlam is, at 
least in part, the perversion of an older, profounder principle of 
positive importance, that is to say, of doctrinal pluralism, doctrinal 



282 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

diversity in Christological unity. Far from being a license to doc- 
trinal recklessness or indifferentism, the Wesleyan principle of plural- 
ism holds in dynamic balance both the biblical focus of all Christian 
doctrine and also the responsible freedom that all Christians must 
have in their theological reflections and public teaching. 

Its premise is expressed in Wesley's familiar maxim: "As to all 
opinions which do not strike at the root of Christianity, we Methodists 
think and let think," and there was never any doubt for him the 
taproot of Christianity was the Scriptural mystery of God in Christ 
and not much else, really. It is simply a fact that United Methodist 
doctrinal standards have always had a pluralistic cast to them. Wes- 
ley's Sermons and Notes and behind them the Book of Common 
Prayer, the Anglican Homilies and Articles and the Evangelical and 
United Brethren Articles and Confessions never were understood as 
merely judicial statutes. Rather, they were so many varied witnesses 
to the truth of Scripture and then to the negative limits of allowable 
public teaching. What then happened, of course, was that all too many 
Methodists found it all too easy to slide off the high plane of doctrinal 
pluralism as a positive virtue into the slough of doctrinal indifferen- 
tism and chaos. 

In my own judgment, the most important single achievement of 
this report, by its intention at least, is our attempted reversal of this 
trend toward indifferentism, by pointing, especially in Part III, to 
the central core of common Christian teaching that we share with 
other Christians, and yet also to our own distinctive guidelines for 
responsible theologizing in the Wesley, Albright, Otterbein tradition. 
How well we have succeeded is, of course, for this Conference and 
the wider theological forum outside this Conference and outside this 
church — for we have tried to speak to them as well — it is for these to 
judge. 

In any case, to have come to you with a doctrinal creed or summary 
that would have pretended to monopolize the doctrinal enterprise 
would have been profoundly unwise, and misleading to boot! More- 
over, in the second place, we were very soon and very deeply impressed 
by the vitality and the relevance of the various new protestant theol- 
ogies, emerging in this epoch of radical change: "black theology," 
"women's liberation theology," "third-world theology," etc. 

While rejecting their exclusivistic claims — as we have also rejected 
all doctrinal monopolies, on principle — we are still very eager for 
all Christians to hear what the Spirit is saying to the churches 
through them: their protests against injustice and indignity to any 
of God's children, their protests for the paramount rights of the 
human person, at every level of interpersonal and social relation- 
ships, regardless of race, sex, nationality or life-style. 

We are also prepared to take seriously and urge you to take seri- 
ously all the various emergent theological viewpoints that are bidding 
for dominance, or at least a hearing, nowadays — "process theology," 
"development theology," "linguistic analysis," "existentialism," the 
"new transcendentalisms" of various sorts — as well as the veritable 
kaleidoscope of special-interest theologies in current fashion: theol- 
ogies of "hope," "ecology" (and, over on the other side, the new 
"pentecostalisms," the "Jesus Movement," "the Childi-en of God," 
etc., etc.). 

Taken, all together, these various "protestant" and "special-inter- 
est" theologies point to the rich diversity that the Christian mind 
can and ought to make room for. But by the very same token, they 
also suggest that the official sponsorship of any one of these theol- 
ogies by The United Methodist Church, to the derogation of any of 
the others, would be wildly imprudent in practice, and wrong in 
principle. Besides, we must never forget that the question of doc- 



The United Methodist Church 283 

trinal standards in The United Methodist Church is closely related 
to our long-standing commitment to the larger cause of Christian 
unity. 

The prime imperative in all serious ecumenical dialogue is that 
each tradition be prepared to interpret itself to all the others, honestly 
and openly, without triumphalism or apology, without misleading 
claims and fruitless polemics. For United Methodists this plainly 
means not only to confess, but to expose our doctrinal pluralism. Our 
concern for pluralism as a positive theological virtue has been rein- 
forced by a third distinctive feature of our epoch, and this may be 
the most important one of all — the rise and spread of what John 
Courtney Murray (and Wilhelm Dilthey before him) spoke of as 
"the historical consciousness," by contrast with the older "classical 
consciousness" that dominated the Christian understanding of doc- 
trine and dogma since Constantine. 

In the European state churches, and even in America up to our 
own time, there has been a tendency to regard creeds and confes- 
sions much in the same way that the secular states construe their 
legislative statutes — that is, as juridical enactments, enforceable by 
punitive sanctions against all violators, or else let simply slide into the 
oblivion of the dead letter, which in fact happens to our Articles in 
our Discipline. But whereas positive law has gone on changing, dog- 
matic formularies tend to resist change— and in one sense rightly so, 
since Christian truth, if it ever could be fully stated in propositional 
form would then be the creed to end all creeds, the doctrines to 
end all doctrinal formulations and only have to be repeated thereafter 
till people understood it properly. 

In the past, the appearance of new creeds has always meant dis- 
placement of the last one you had with the normal implication that the 
last one had some sort of insufficiency (or maybe error!). But once 
you confess the past creed had an error that your forefathers and 
some others could not see, then you say they had an error, what may 
be lurking in our creed that our children may see? This juridical 
mindset was as typical of "classical Protestantism" as of Roman 
Catholicism up till Vatican II. 

Now, our emerging historical consciousness that all of us in this 
room share, one way or another, has altered this static view of 
dogma beyond all i-ecognition and control. Nowadays we ask, as if 
by instinct, about the historical context of any document or pro- 
nouncement. 

This sense of context and perspective has made modern his- 
tory possible, and modern Biblical study, too, as one of its by-products. 
It allows us to appreciate the ancient creeds and confessions afresh 
and then to repossess their living truth in the light of radically 
new experience. This holds true for the Apostles' Creed, the Augsburg 
Confession, the Westminster Catechism. It holds for Wesley's Ser- 
mons. It holds for his Notes, and especially it holds for our Articles 
and Confession. 

Time was when these landmark documents were contemporary and 
the interesting thing is that the most contemporary thing about them 
when they were first formulated are the things that are now most 
clearly dated about them in our own eyes. But each one of them also 
enshrines perennial Christian truth ; and in that sense they are still 
contemporary! Old articles don't have to be discarded. They don't 
have to be reiterated, either. Thus, we have felt ourselves quite 
free to retain our historical landmarks without embarrassment or 
apology, but then quite deliberately, to set them in a new twin per- 
spective or interpretation — of our heritage, on the one hand, (and 
that's Part I) and our contemporary crisis on the other (and that's 
what Part II is talking about) . 



284 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

W© hope that you have noticed that we have tried to clarify the 
contextual relationships between the Articles, the Confession, and 
Wesley's Sermons and Notes and Rules, in order to clarify the refer- 
ence to the first restrictive rule about "our present existing and estab- 
lished standards of doctrines." We have not altered these standards, 
as such, but we have proposed a genuinely new principle for doc- 
trinal self-understanding in The United Methodist Church. Thus, we 
have tried to reaffirm our share in the Christian tradition, as a 
whole, even as we have also tried to accent, once again, the distinctive 
Wesleyan guidelines (Scripture, tradition, experience, reason); and 
it is these guidelines that we propose to you as our best safeguard 
against doctrinal indiff erentism ! 

Now, Mr. Chairman, we would not wish to claim too much for this 
report. It bears the blemishes of haste and the inelegancies of com- 
mittee English. There is at least one misspelling that I apologize for, 
and one split infinitive that proves that the Committee got the best of 
the Chairman more than once. It is, as some of you say, too long. 
To this, one might respond, without any disrespect and with all- 
loving friendship, that in a Discipline that has 268 pages devoted to 
"Administrative Order" and 53 pages to "Property," less than 40 
pages for "Doctrinal Statements and the General Rules" is not wildly 
disproportionate, especially when you look at our early Disciplines, 
where they, so to say, had gotten the "hang of it." 

If this report could be put to fruitful use in promoting theological 
reflection amongst United Methodists, and if it could also serve the 
urgent cause of helping our theological identity in the eyes of other 
Christians, the extra print and paper would be as well justified as 
most of the wood pulp we use up daily. 

And yet, for all its faults, there are three bold claims I make 
for the report, without any personal immodesty or misgiving. The 
first is that it is a truly corporate product of this Commission as a 
whole — an unstinted, cumulative, cooperative effort by a wonderfully 
representative, which is also to say "hard-headed" and difficult, group 
of United Methodists, all working on marginal time and within a 
very frugal budget! . . . 

Now, my second claim is that minimally, at least, the report faith- 
fully represents the best in the traditions of the Wesleyans, of Al- 
bright, and Otterbein, not by replication, but by re-presentation and 
re-interpretation. As such, it is offered as a useful guide for those 
who wish to repossess those traditions and to renew them for further 
service in Christian mission. This is crucially important if The United 
Methodist Church is to have any sustainable revival of the gospel in 
a contemporary version of John Wesley's catholic spirit. 

My third claim is that, however crudely, this repoi't lays the foun- 
dations for the still further development of a stable theory of doc- 
trinal interpi-etation in The United Methodist Church. It is offered 
less as a legislative statute than as an act of encouragement and 
enablement. We have tried to open the way for the widest possible 
participation of United Methodists in the mutual task of the teaching 
church. Instead of presuming to tell our people what to think, theo- 
logically, we have tried to offer basic guidance as to how we may 
all do theologically together, faithful to our rich and yet very di- 
verse heritage, and yet also relevant to our present ideological con- 
fusion. If it is adopted and taken seriously enough, which would also 
mean critically enough, it could quite conceivably become something 
of a landmark in itself. It could also, of course, serve this Confer- 
ence and the church to a barely stifled yawn and go down as yet 
another of our high-minded but largely wasted efforts. Our fears go 
one way; our hopes and prayers go the other. 



The United Methodist Church 285 

Procedure Proposed by Commission 

Dr. Outler stated that the Commission had petitioned the 
Judicial Council for its judgment as to the process by which 
Part II of The Book of Discipline may be amended. He ex- 
pressed the hope of the Commission that, whatever the 
ruling of the Judicial Council, the report would be con- 
sidered as a constitutional amendment, with the stipulation 
that the work of the Commission was not in violation of 
the first restrictive rule, but that it was instead "proposing 
a new development in the interpretation of the process by 
which doctrinal reflection and teaching ought to evolve, 
go on evolving, in The United Methodist Church." 

He stated the view of the Commission that this change 
needs to be supported by a solidly affirmative vote; the 
Commission would therefore request that final action be by 
a written recorded ballot. If such a ballot were strongly 
affirmative, the Commission would propose that the report 
be referred to the Annual Conferences for discussion and 
appropriate action. The Commission would then further 
propose the creation of an Editorial Committee for the 
1973-76 quadrennium which would prepare an anthology 
of doctrinal affirmations, summaries, creeds, and liturgies 
for use in the church. In the event the vote of the General 
Conference was unfavorable or a narrow majority, the 
Commission would propose that Part II of The Book of 
Discipline remain the same for another quadrennium and 
a new Theological Study Commission be established to con- 
tinue the project. 

Statements by Commission Members 

Dr. Outler introduced four members of the Commission 
who made statements on behalf of the report. 

J. Bruce Behney (United Theological Seminary) : Since serious 
discussion began on uniting the Methodist and the Evangelical United 
Brethren Churches it has been said that differences in doctrinal em- 
phases among them were minimal. Generally speaking this was true. 
But a careful study of the 25 Methodist Articles and the Confession 
of Faith of the Evangelical United Brethren Church has shown that 
at a number of points the spirit and the letter of the doctrinal state- 
ments are different. 

Nevertheless, as shown in Section I of the report, close doctrinal 
agreements are to be found in the early history of the three denomi- 
nations which are now one in The United Methodist Church. 

The Evangelicals, as early as 1809, expressed their doctrinal be- 
liefs largely by accepting with only slight revision a German trans- 
lation of the Methodist Discipline and the Articles of Faith. The early 
United Brethren, although interested in this German translation, did 
not accept this as an official pronouncement of their polity or beliefs. 
This was due to the fact that Phillip Otterbein, the only leader in 
both German groups who had full theological training, was inclined to 
express his doctrinal beliefs in the terms of warm pietism and the 



286 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

greatly modified Calvinism which had developed within the German 
Reformed Theological School at Herrborn, Germany, where he had 
received his theological training. 

Incidentally, this was not a position casually to be called Armen- 
ianism. In the early United Brethren Conferences, Otterbein gave 
doctrinal discourses to which his theologically untrained associates 
listened with close attention and with great profit. Otterbein's utter- 
ances, confirmed by several of his written doctrinal statements which 
have been preserved, support the belief that he was broad and gentle 
in his religious convictions, with a very clearly expressed ecumenical 
spirit. The consequence of this led the United Brethren to be the 
freest of the three branches of our united church in their earliest 
years, and therefore able to hold a doctrinal position which can be 
harmonized with the Wesleyan tradition. 

This can be seen in the sharing in the doctrinal guidelines which 
typified the Wesleyan tradition. Yet even here, along with the Evan- 
gelicals, the United Brethren differed at least in emphasis from the 
Methodists. Instead of the four guidelines as set forth in Section 
3 of the Commission's report; namely, scripture, tradition, experi- 
ence and reason, with each of the four guidelines receiving a com- 
parable emphasis, the Evangelicals and the United Brethren placed 
greater and firmer stress on religious experience. This fact, incidently, 
was pointed out by Professor William Henry Naumann in his doc- 
trinal thesis submitted to, and accepted by, Yale University in 1963. 

Professor Naumann goes on to say that while this religious experi- 
ence was often vei'y emotional, the religious convictions emerging 
from it were called into question if they did not conform to calm, 
even though uncritical, Biblical interpretations, to clear and clearly 
expressed common sense, and if in consequence of this they did not 
issue in good works based on morality and self -discipline. 

As the histories of the Evangelical United Brethren Churches de- 
veloped, these standards and judgments came to be more orderly, 
especially as schools of religion such as seminaries came into exis- 
tence. Hence, the traditional Evangelical United Brethren emphasis 
upon religious experience. Biblical guidance, clear common sense, and 
moral zeal came to closely parallel to the Wesleyan quadrilateral guide- 
lines of scripture, tradition, experience and reason. 

This being the case the former Evangelical United Brethren should 
have no difficulty, it seems to me, in subscribing to this whole report 
including the statements in Section 3, entitled namely The Gospel in 
The New Age, United Methodists and the Christian Tradition, Dis- 
tinctive EmiJhases of United Methodists, and Theological Frontiers 
and New Directions. 

William G. Smartt (New York) : Archimedes, the philosopher, said, 
"Give me a place to stand, and I will move the earth." Unfortunately, 
though. United Methodists, theologically speaking, have no such place 
to stand, but the eff'orts of the Theological Commission do represent 
an effort to formulate what we believe and provide a method to con- 
struct sound belief. Spiritual poverty exists among those who say 
"belief is not important" and those who don't know what they believe. 
In addition, we are so caught up in the need for social change, 
problems of racism and war, that we think social change of itself 
can bring about a just society, a Utopia, even the kingdom of God. 
Little do we realize that until our foundations for social change rest 
upon right belief and sound doctrine, social impetus will lose its 
momentum. 

Until we see the question of racism, war, poverty, etc. m the larger 
context of man's inability to relate positively to one another, and 
see the relatedness of social problems to the major areas of faith, 



The United Methodist Church 287 

redemption, justification, sanctification, etc. we then will be headed 
for doom. 

As Dr. Trueblood points out in his book A Place to Stand, he 
says what is needed (these are my own words) are a whole new bunch 
of cats who have reached a firm place to stand and who are able to 
tell us the road by which they have come and why they have taken 
it. I think the efforts of the Theological Commission is a step in that 
direction, helping all of us to re-evaluate our own postures and help- 
ing those who will come behind us and give them some direction and 
some hope and, above all, a foundation upon which to stand. Thank 
you very much. 

Emerson Colaiv (West Ohio) : A seminary professor remarked to 
a group of preachers: "Never let me hear you say you are not a 
theologian. As you preach and teach in the local church you are the 
theologian in residence." Now this is a difficult image for some of 
us to accept, and as Dr. Thornburg, secretary of our Commission, 
observed in an article in the Advocate there was a time when the book 
was called The Doctrine And Discipline of The Methodist Church; 
then we omitted the word Doctrine from the title, leaving some to 
suggest that United Methodism had dropped doctrine out of life. 

And yet every pastor, possibly every layman, has encountered the 
question, "What does your church believe?" The answer has usually 
been: "What one particular United Methodist believes." This report 
will make it possible for us to speak with some assurance of emphases 
and directions which we hold in common. I would confess that initially 
I was disappointed we were not going to try our hand at forming a 
creed. I thought this would be a valued liturgical asset, as well as 
an aid in our teaching ministry, but creed suggests unanimity of 
thought, and once they are produced often tend to discourage further 
theological inquiry. 

Some of us would feel that a part of our genius is the richness of 
our doctrinal diversity. So what we have in the report is not a 
theological party line to which we must all subscribe. It is an effort 
to call thoughtful attention to sources and content of our message. 
It does not attempt to tell us what to say or preach. It does provide 
guidelines which will not only encourage us to do theological thinking 
but will assist us in our evangelistic outreach, in celebration and wor- 
ship, in our nurturing responsibility and in meaningful social applica- 
tion. Now not every idea has been expressed in the way I would 
prefer, and there are times when we admit that the document looks 
as though it wei-e put together by a committee. And yet I think as 
you read it you'll discover that there are passages and sections where 
it literally sings. Throughout the language is reasonably non-technical, 
for the Commission always labored with the needs of the local church 
in view. 

It's for these reasons, as a pastor, that I urge us not only to receive 
the report, but I hope we will take the document home and use it 
in the further renewal of our parish life. Thank you. 

Bishop William R. Cannon (Raleigh Area) : A prominent lay mem- 
ber of this Conference said to me about the report we are now con- 
sidering, "The first and second sections on our doctrinal history and 
on the formularies of the faith are all right, but I'm not sure about 
Section III. It seems to contradict Section I and to contravene Section 
II. It looks like you're asking us to do over again what our fathers 
have already done so well for us." 

In one sense we are asking our people to do just that. Theology 
is no more than a museum of old treasures unless it is rethought, re- 
stated and reapplied by every new generation. The revelation of God 
to man, the divine content of faith, is contained only in the Scripture: 



288 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

the mighty acts of God himself in behalf of his people and the direc- 
tives of God spoken by prophets and apostles and personified perfectly 
in the life, death and the resurrection of Jesus Christ — the Word 
made flesh that dwelt among us. 

Theology, on the other hand, is a science that we as receptive 
human beings construct out of our thought on and interpretation of 
the data of revelation. We receive these data, like everything else, 
through experience. What we receive we test by observing the effec- 
tiveness of our beliefs on our own lives and the inspiration and em- 
powerment they afford us in making the gospel real to other people. 

I see a lot of my classmates in seminary at Yale University a long 
time ago as delegates here. They will remember our old professor of 
theology, how he put the matter succinctly when he said a man has a 
right to believe what he must in order to live as he ought. A man 
has to do that in every age in which he lives; therefore. Section III 
is different from Sections I and II in this report, but it is neither a 
denial of our history nor a repudiation of our confession. Rather it 
is an appreciation and grateful affirmation of both, and an invitation 
to our people to theologize as a church in this age as our fathers 
theologized so well in theirs. 

We've sought to discriminate the basic principles which they em- 
ployed and which are still essential and operative if we are to succeed 
in our efforts now. Whatever we do in the way of theological con- 
struction and doctrinal interpretation must be rooted and grounded 
in Scripture, must be capable of confirmation and experience, and 
must commend itself to reason — that is, to good hard common sense. 
It's apt to be true if it works — I've never been averse to pragmatism 
— if it works; that is, if it's preachable, if lives are transformed 
through its proclamation and the world is improved by its message. 
A theology that you can't use in preaching is spurious. I am glad that 
the report of this Commission comes early on the agenda. I hope that 
it will be adopted after study. I hope that you, as you read it, will 
use its guidelines as we assess other reports; for example, that of 
the Commission on the Social Creed. Theology is the tutor of ethics, 
and Christian morality always and invariably is the expression in 
personal behaviour and social action of the Christian faith. If our 
concept of God and our relationship to Him is inadequate, then 
what we do will be less than what we ought to do. It's not enough, as 
St. Augustine said, to know from what things to refrain our love, 
but we must know as well where to bestow it. And this knowledge 
is the gift of faith. 

On behalf of the Commission, Dr. Outler moved that the 
report remain before the Conference for consideration and 
action at a time to be designated by the Agenda Committee. 
The motion was approved. 

Prayer Concerning the War in Vietnam 

E. Paul linger (Central Illinois) stated that the Youth 
Delegation Caucus, the Youth Caucus and the Seminarian 
Caucus were asking the Conference to join in a prayer con- 
cerning the war in Vietnam. The Chair asked if the Con- 
ference would grant the request, and it was voted that it 
be done. 

E. Paul Unger: We confess. Oh Lord, our continuing concern over 
a continuing war that has made us weary. We know, Oh Lord, the 



The United Methodist Church 289 

judgment that is in that war against us and against the nations 
who resort to the force of arms in the settlement of differences. 
We just pray, Oh Lord, that you would help our leaders and the 
leaders of other countries involved in struggles such as these, but 
particularly our own leaders, to understand that there must be other 
ways than war to strive for the issue of peace, through Jesus Christ 
our Lord. Amen. 

The Conference was in recess for fifteen minutes. 

Social Principles Study Commission (see page 1932) 

The Chair recognized Melvin G. Talbert (Southern Cali- 
fornia-Arizona) for the presentation of the report. Mr. 
Talbert indicated that he would make a statement concern- 
ing the report, followed by a presentation by the chairman 
of the Commission, Bishop James S. Thomas, Iowa Area. 
There would then be a motion of reference. 

Melvin Talbert: A book that most of us are familiar with is 
a book entitled Future Shock by Alvin Toffler, and as we read that 
book we discover that it reveals to us the possible results of mankind, 
if he is not capable of adjusting to the rapid changes that are in- 
evitable. This document that we have written has a positive and 
forward thrust which propels us into the future with a sense of 
excitement and optimism. As we act upon this document, and we 
will be doing that at a later point in this General Conference, we 
need to be reminded of the fact that the Word did become flesh 
and dwell among us. 

This document is designed to challenge our church, you, me and 
all United Methodists, to become the living manifestation of that 
Word which was and is expressed in the life and ministry of Jesus 
Christ. To this end we have dealt with unpopular and controversial 
issues, but to have done less we would have failed in our efforts to 
faithfully respond to the task set before us by the 1968 General 
Conference, and we would have failed to respond to the call of God 
for our lives. In his book Where Do We Go From Here, Chapter 6, 
entitled "The World House," the late Dr. Martin Luther King made 
this statement, and I quote: "Some years ago a famous novelist 
died. Among his papers were found a list of suggested plots for 
future stories. The most prominently underscored being this one, 
'A Widely Separated Family Inherited a House in Which They 
Have To Live Together.' " The theme for our document is community. 
Now this concept became an exciting one for us. When we recognize 
that it is within the various communities that we find ourselves, 
we are challenged to work out of our existence. We may describe 
these as natural communities, or human communities. So we have 
come here today excited about the possibilities for this document 
in our church. 

We believe it can and would be one instrument through which we 
can speak to our constituency and to all persons of faith, challenging 
them to become faithful and committed servants in both word and 
deed. And so, we commit this report to you with the hope that you 
will adopt it following consideration by the Legislative Committee on 
Christian Social Concerns. 

Bishop James S. Thomas 

Mr. Talbert introduced Bishop Thomas, the chairman of 
the Social Principles Study Commission. Bishop Thomas 



290 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

introduced the other members of the Commission, He re- 
viewed the mandate given the Commission by the 1968 
General Conference and the progress of its work during the 
quadrennium. He commented on the diversity reflected in 
the membership of the Commission and the strength this 
has added to its deliberations. He stated that when the re- 
port comes to the Conference for final action, two additional 
materials would be with it, one being a "Liturgy of Social 
Witness," prepared by Richard D. Tholin (Northern Hli- 
nois), and the other an "Aflfirmation of Social Action" by 
J. Elliott Corbett (Staff, General Board of Christian Social 
Concerns). 

Bishop Thomas: I would want to refer quite briefly and pointedly 
to some of the major things that must be done with whatever we 
adopt as the official statement of this Conference. 

1. In the present Book of Discipline, section 4 of Paragraph 96, 
the following is stated: Our Mandate: Read, Study, Apply — We 
recommend that this Social Creed be presented to our congregations 
orally or in printed form at least once a year and that frequent 
reference be made to it. Every local church shall encourage the 
study of the Social Creed and seek to apply its principles." 

Our Commission regards this as a highly significant mandate that 
might well be appended to the official Statement of Social Principles 
that will be adopted by the 1972 General Conference. However, our 
Commission strongly believes that the mandate should be extended 
in ways which this General Conference will certainly decide. We 
recommend that the Social Principles that are adopted here be com- 
mended to the general boards and agencies as well as being read in 
the local churches, that the Social Principles be commended for study 
and reading and careful implementation to local churches, as well 
as to Annual Conferences, to investment committees, as well as to 
personal individual lives. Our recommendation is an attempt to have 
the Social Principles find their way into the lifestream of the church. 

No one needs to make a statement as to how badly we need new 
texts, both theologically, ethically and from the standpoint of resolu- 
tion. But both you and I know that this is not the area of crucial 
failure. It is the acting out of the gospel, after articulation, the 
being and the doing of the gospel for which the world now dies. 
And it is our hope that these Social Principles will find their way 
into the lifestream, the behavior, the habits, the motivations, the 
structures of society in such a way that our church might become 
a power for our Lord Jesus Christ in 1972 and the years following. 
Now, while we know that in a statement of this type we'll always 
face differences in point of view, we believe that the urgency of 
social issues and the desperate state of the world demands some 
clear word from United Methodists. 

Our recommendation, this Statement of Social Principles, is not 
an attempt simply to speak the world's language, but it is clearly 
an attempt to give clear meaning to the crucial areas in which human 
beings struggle and sometimes die. It is an attempt to speak the 
word of the gospel to a secular generation without ourselves for- 
getting the mandate which we have from the Lord of all the earth. 

2. Believing that the present widespread search for new ways of 
worshipping God is a great opportunity for the church, we are 
presenting two suggested worship forms of the Social Principles, 
not for your adoption, you being quite able to adopt these to your 



The United Methodist Church 291 

uses as you see fit. These, we hope, will be upon your table when 
this report comes back from Committee, and we hope you will find 
ready use in worship for these ancillary materials. 

3. It is inevitable that many will wonder why specific issues were 
not given more extensive treatment. This must not be seen as lack 
of interest or emphasis. The Commission defined its task as that of 
setting forth principles general enough to be the basis of more specific 
resolutions, yet specific enough to leave no doubt as to the subject 
under consideration. A statement of social principles is not a long 
commentary on sixty-nine issues. In our review it is the basis on which 
we might frame our thinking and from which our specific resolutions 
might be taken, and we have assumed that the Book of Resolutions 
which came to us after the 1968 General Conference will also be 
coming to us, after the 1972 General Conference. 

I think you readily recognize the problem. If the Commission had 
attempted all the elaborations they desired to do, on such subjects 
as drugs and war, it would be presenting a document that would be 
at least three times as long as the present document. One of our 
major difficulties was the attempt to make this document short 
enough, yet comprehensive enough to be usable, and this we have 
sought faithfully to do. Instead of such a lengthy document, the 
Commission sought to speak as clearly as we could to certain areas 
of life that are crucial in the 1970's. 

Just a quick example of how this approach might be helpful at 
this point: In section C of the former Methodist Creed, two para- 
graphs are given to crime and rehabilitation. They were honored 
paragraphs serving their day and generation quite well. However, 
when our Commission studied this area, it became necessary to consid- 
er, not only crime, but the prison system, as last September's Attica 
all too graphically underlined. Not only deviant crime, but the ease 
with which some are arrested, if they are poor and unconventional, 
and the similar ease by whch some escape harass — not simply crude 
crime, but respectable crime must be the concern of our church. In 
a word, the crucial issue surrounding the administration of justice 
required a broader interpretation of our work, and this we sought 
to do. 

Also, in the former EUB Social Concerns, three paragraphs were 
given to racial and cultural relations. Again, they served their day 
and generation well. Given the times in which we live, your Com- 
mission considered it important to speak specifically concerning the 
rights of women, the rights of our youth, the rights of ethnic minori- 
ties, the rights of children, and we received numerous suggestions to 
speak about the rights of men. 

With this background of our nature, work and procedure, it is 
now my privilege, Mr. Chairman, to offer this entire report of the 
Social Principles Commission and respectfully and carefully commend 
it to your most careful attention. And may the good God guide all 
of us to be the pilgrim church, improving it upward, not downward — 
outward, not inward, with an all-inclusive reach toward the people 
of God for whom Christ died. 

Referral of the Report 

Melvin G. Talbert moved that the report be referred to 
the Legislative Committee on Christian Social Concerns. 
Carroll H. Long (Holston) raised a point of order that the 
motion to refer to a specific committee v^as not in accor- 
dance with the regular rules of the Conference. The Chair 
stated that the Conference had the right either to send the 



292 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

report to the Committee on Reference for referral or to 
specify legislative committees to which it should be referred. 
Ted I. Richardson (Southwest Texas) moved as a sub- 
stitute that the report be sent to the Committee on Refer- 
ence for referral. Mr. Talbert accepted the substitute on 
behalf of the Commission. The Chair called for the vote, 
and the report was referred. 

Interpreter for Delegates from Zaire 

The Chair stated that there had been a request for per- 
mission to seat an interpreter with the delegates from 
Zaire to facilitate their participation in the Conference. It 
was moved, seconded and voted that such permission be 
granted. 

Commission to Study the Ministry (see page 1711) 

The Chair recognized Bishop D. Frederick Wertz, West 
Virginia Area, chairman of the Commission to Study the 
Ministry. Bishop Wertz stated that he would make a state- 
ment introducing the report, that there would be additional 
statements by Gene E. Sease (Western Pennsylvania) and 
Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest), and that the presenta- 
tion would then be concluded with a motion of reference. 

Bishop Wertz stated that a review of the history of both 
the Methodist and Evangelical United Brethren Churches 
evidenced a continuing interest in the study of the ministry 
of the church. He reviewed the specific mandate given this 
Commission by the 1968 General Conference. Members and 
consultants of the Commission were introduced. 

Bishop Wertz: Now I should like to make seven quick observations 
about the vi'ork of this commission. The first is that we attempted 
to operate from the theological base which is posited within the Book 
of the Discipline where we affirm our commitment to ministry in 
the Christian church which is derived from the ministry of Christ, 
the ministry of the Father through the incarnate Son by the Holy 
Spirit. It is a ministry bestowed upon and required of the entire 
church. But the Book of Discipline goes on to affirm that there are 
persons within the ministry of the baptized who are called of God 
and set apart by the church for the specialized ministry of Word, 
Sacrament and order. This is the ordained ministry of The United 
Methodist Church, and it cherishes its origin in the Christian tradition 
and in the Wesleyan tradition from which it has come. 

The commission believes that the church is responsible for the 
selection and education of an adequate number of qualified persons 
to carry out its ministry. This responsibility begins in a local con- 
gregation and is shared by boards of ministry and church administra- 
tors at every conference level and by the church's schools of theology; 
and it is on the basis of this understanding of and commitment to 
the ministry of the church that the commission proceeded to do its 
work. In the second place, I want to call your attention to the relation- 
ship which exists between the schools of theology and the church. 



The United Methodist Church 293 

Those institutions are not owned or controlled by the church at 
large ; they are autonomous institutions, and the only authority which 
we hold over them is the authority of persuasion and the authority 
which accrues to that body responsible for the distribution of the 
funds by which those institutions are supported. It is important to 
understand that as you consider this report and know that each 
Board of Directors or Board of Trustees is responsible in its steward- 
ship for the affairs of its institutions. 

In the third place, the Commission desires to commend the theologi- 
cal schools of the church for the significant service they render and 
for the quality of their performance as it is evidenced in the lives 
of those young men and women who are the products of our schools. 
You have every reason to be proud of the schools of theology, fourteen 
of them, which are presently serving the ministerial needs of The 
United Methodist Church. 

In the fourth place, we would like to observe that the whole question 
of ministerial manpower needs is an open question for discussion. 
Projections of these needs vary widely. But when all the evidence is 
in, it seems to us as though the need for ministerial leadership in the 
life of the church over the next ten years is not likely to vary 
substantially from what it is today. And this is to say that the 
capacity of our present schools is more than adequate to the need 
which the church shall face in the next decade. 

In the fifth place, we should like to call attention, by way of 
observation, to the question of the stewardship of our resources. We 
are hearing a great deal these days about reordering of our priorities. 
That is to say, the financial resources that are available to the 
church must be used in such a way as to justify the stewardship 
which has been committed to our care. . . . 

In the sixth place, by way of observation, the Commission would 
like to emphasize the need for varieties of theological education 
experiences in a church like The United Methodist Church. There 
is no one carefully prescribed program of theological education which 
is adequate to all of our needs, and a part of our genius is to be 
found in the fact that there are varieties of opportunities among 
us. And you may be grateful for that. 

My seventh observation is simply to say that the Commission was 
extremely sensitive to the resources of the church in theological 
education — the resources of manpower, represented by great faculties 
spread across this nation; the human resources that are represented 
in the student bodies enrolled in all of our seminaries ; and in what- 
ever is done to affect the future of these institutions. We need to be 
concerned about the effects of those decisions upon the lives 
of men and women who are themselves intimately involved in the 
process. We are aware, likewise, of the material resources available 
to us, and we believe the church is called upon to use those resources 
in responsible ways. 

Theological education will cost more in the days to come than it 
has cost in the past. There is no reason for us to believe that we 
can support the kinds of schools of theology this church needs with 
fewer dollars tomorrow than we spent yesterday. The demands for 
increasing support will be upon us. But there is a concomitant 
demand that we be good stewards in the use of those resources, so 
that the church may be faithful to its task. 

Gene E. Sease (Western Pennsylvania) called attention 
to the six principles for the future of theological education 
presented in the Commission's report. He also reviewed the 



294 Journal of the 1972 General Confey^ence 

five recommendations contained in the Commission report 
for seminaries in specific geographical areas. 

Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) called attention to 
the Commission's recommendations on continuing educa- 
tion as contained in the report. He then referred the Con- 
ference to the section of the report dealing with administra- 
tive structure for advancement of the church's ministry. 

Mr. Tuell: A bit of history here is in order. In the former Methodist 
Church the predecessor of the present Boards of Ministry of the 
Annual Conference were the Boards of Ministerial Training and 
Qualifications. That board, by its nature and by its name, was con- 
cerned primarily with the matter of the training, the education, the 
qualifying of personnel to come into the ministry of The United 
Methodist Church. Therefore, it was very appropriate that at the 
national level the Department of the Ministry should fall within the 
Division of Higher Education. However, at Dallas in 1968 a new 
development came. This came from the Evangelical United Brethren 
side of the union in which they had been accustomed to a Board of 
the Ministry which is much larger in its scope than the former 
Methodist Board of Ministerial Training and Qualifications. 

The Board of Ministry concept sees the task of the board as being 
concerned with the total life of the ministry, with its continuing 
education, with its conservation, with its sustenance, with ways of 
seeking to make that ministry the most valuable and the most 
helpful in our time. Therefore, the scope of the work of Conference 
Boards of the Ministry, Annual Conference Boards of the Ministry, 
has increased tremendously with the advent of this concept at Dallas. 
It began to seem highly incongruous then to have this Board of the 
Ministry at the conference level, which has such a broad concern, 
have as its national counterpart a Department of the Ministry with- 
in a Division of Higher Education within the Board of Education. 
Serious consideration was given to the idea of creating at the national 
level a Board of the Ministry. However, this was rejected by the 
Commission ultimately on the basis that the tie to the total educa- 
tional thrust and emphasis of the church is important, and therefore 
the proposal as you find it here is that the Department of the Ministry 
become the Division of the Ministry within the Board of Education. 

Now we all are aware that the total structure of the church is 
"up for grabs," so to speak, and therefore, exactly what total struc- 
ture will emerge is a question that all of us have. However, as I 
understand the Structure Study Commission Report, the status of 
the ministry section is that of a division. We believe it is important 
to the continued work of the ordained ministry of the church that 
this particular status be given to its work at the national level. 
I might call attention to the fact that in a recent nationwide survey 
of the laity concerning what they felt was important about the church 
one of the first things they have mentioned, time and time again, is 
the necessity of providing a trained ministry for the church — trained 
leadership. Therefore, we believe that this change in national church 
structure is important. 

Proposal for Continuing Study Commission 

Mr. Tuell: ... In conclusion, we, once again, want to reiterate 
that the Study of the Ministry within our church is a continuing 
etudy that has been going on for some thirty years at least. We feel 
that it is essential that this study continue, and we call in the report 



The United Methodist Church 295 

for the creation of a continuing Study Commission of the Ministry, 
and you will notice that at the bottom of the column that we call 
upon it to carry out three special tasks. 

First, to review and evaluate the progress of the seminaries in 
carrying out the provisions of the report as they may be adopted 
by this General Conference — you remember in Dr. Sease's presenta- 
tion the description of the Task Forces in the various areas of the 
countj-y and how they will be reporting to this Commission periodical- 
ly and the need to oversee that work. 

The second item is continuing education, its growth and develop- 
ment. We want to call attention to the tremendous growing need 
in this area of our church's life. 

The third area is that of special appointments, and I know that 
all of you who are on Boards of Ministry here, I am certain that 
all of the bishops and superintendents and I think most of you who 
are here who are acquainted at all with the matter of special appoint- 
ments of ordained ministers know that this area is one which at 
the present time is somewhat in the condition of a great oblong 
blur which needs desperately study and clarification as to the nature 
of the ordaining ministry and the place of special appointments 
within that ministry. Therefore, we propose that this subject be 
one of the three emphases for The Continuing Study Commission 
during the quadrennium 1972-76. 

Referral of Report 

On behalf of the Commission Gene E. Sease (Western 
Pennsylvania) moved that the report be referred to the 
Legislative Committee on Clergy. John B. Howes (Central 
Pennsylvania) asked vi^hether it might not be appropriate 
for the report also to be considered by the Legislative Com- 
mittee on Education. Bishop Wertz stated that the Com- 
mission was willing to follow the will of the Conference. 
Mr. Howes moved a substitute that the report be sent to 
the Committee on Reference for referral to the appropriate 
legislative committees. The substitute was accepted on be- 
half of the Commission, and the motion was approved. 

Devotional Addresses and Sermons 

Richard Pittenger (South Dakota) : In view of the recommendation 
by the Commission on Entertainment and Program to delete the 
Devotional Addresses and Sermons from the Daily Christian Advo- 
cate, I move that such sermons and addresses be made available in 
mimeographed form, at cost, to those desiring. If I get a second, 
I would like to say just a brief word about it. 

Mr. Pittenger spoke in behalf of his motion. The motion 
was approved and referred to the Commission on Entertain- 
ment and Program for implementation. 

Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 

Bishop Hardin announced the meeting of the Interjuris- 
dictional Committee on Episcopacy and stated that the con- 
venors for their respective jurisdictions would be Bishop 
Roy Short (Louisville Area), Bishop Eugene Frank (Mis- 



296 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

souri Area) , Bishop Lloyd Wicke (New York Area) , Bishop 
Thomas Pryor (Chicago Area), and Bishop Gerald Kennedy 
(Los Angeles Area) . 

Announcements 

Announcements were given by the Secretary-Designate, 
J. B. Holt. 

Closing Prayer 

The closing prayer was given by Bishop O. Eugene Slater, 
San Antonio Area. 



FOURTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19, 1972 

MORNING SESSION 
Opening— Bishop Roy C. Nichols 

Pursuant to adjournment, the General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church convened in the morning session 
of the fourth day, Wednesday, April 19, 1972, at 8 :30 a.m. 
in the Civic Center, Atlanta, Georgia, vv^ith Bishop Roy C. 
Nichols, Pittsburgh Area, presiding. 

Devotions 

The Conference sang Hymn No. 72, "All Hail the Pov^^er 
of Jesus' Name," and joined in a litany entitled "A Recol- 
lection of Jesus." John 14:1-7; Acts 4:8-13; and I Corin- 
thians 1 :20-24 vi^ere read. Bishop Ralph T. Alton, Wiscon- 
sin Area, spoke on the subject, "Alv^ays Remember Jesus" 
(see page 729). Hymn No. 173, "0 Young and Fearless 
Prophet," v^as sung. 

Choral selections v^ere presented by the choir of the Mt. 
Zion United Methodist Church, Washington, D. C, with 
Mrs. Romaldo de Veau as organist/director. 

Committee on Agenda 

The agenda as printed in the Daily Christian Advocate 
was presented to the Conference by Edward L. Tidlis (Ken- 
tucky) , vice-chairman of the Committee on Agenda. It was 
adopted. 

Mayor of Atlanta — Sam Massell 

Bishop J. Owen Smith, Atlanta Area, introduced the 
mayor of Atlanta, Sam Massell, to the Conference. 

Mr. Massell: Thank you very much and good morning ladies and 
gentlemen. I was very interested when the bishop in his introductory 
remarks identified me as one of our own; I thought he was about to 
convert me there, and then he went on to mention that I was a native 
Atlantan and this was his reference. 

I have been reading about you. As mayors go I am considered some- 
what of a controversial figure ; so I feel right at home this morning. 
I want you to know though that the fact that I am four or five 
days late in welcoming you had nothing to do with the advance 
publicity on this convention. It was difficult for me to make arrange- 
ments to be here on the earlier meetings although I was invited to 
do so, and the Reverend Bevel Jones just wouldn't take no for an 
answer ; and we kept working for a calendar that would fit your busy 
schedule and mine; so it is my pleasure that I am able to be here 
this morning for one purpose, and one purpose alone, and that is to 
welcome you and make you realize that indeed we are very pleased 
and happy to have you in our city. 

I say that in spite of the fact that I feel like fussing a bit when I 
understand that you are approaching 100 years of age and this is the 

297 



298 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

first time you have met in our city, and this is hard to understand. 
I think now that you have been here, you will agree with me that this 
is a place which lends itself to conferences such as this. Bringing 
people together from all over the world, people with different philos- 
ophies from different racial backgrounds and all of the thinking and 
input that comes into a place like this, makes us very proud because 
it does more in this building. You know the deliberations that can 
be developed here and the thoughts that can be brought together can 
mean so much to man. For it to happen in our city makes us very 
proud. I know you are here for serious deliberations, but I hope that 
you will have some time from your very busy schedule to move about 
the city and get to know us a bit. We have got a very exciting place 
here. You will find a lot of new development in every direction; not 
the least of course is a new $17 million multi-purpose coliseum which 
is being developed at no expense to the taxpayer, probably unequalled 
in financial negotiations anywhere in this country. As you move about 
the city you will see a bus system providing public transportation 
at a 15-cent fare, this having been voted in by the people of this 
region of Fulton and DeKalb Counties by self-taxation of a one 
percent sales tax in order to bring down the fare from forty cents 
and a nickel to 15 cents— forty cents and a five cents transfer to 
15 cents so that those who need public transportation the most can 
afford public transportation. 

You're in a city which is providing real mobility to its community, 
and you probably came into our airport, a facility we call 'a new 
airport' because that terminal was just completed about eleven years 
ago; and right now we are spending $110,000,000 there just to sort 
of keep up with today's needs while we are looking around for a loca- 
tion for a second airport. And this is your airport, that is for many 
of you, because it surely serves this entire region. It has an impact 
economically on much of this country. It is the third busiest airport 
in the United States. It is the number one interchange airport in 
the whole world. In fact, they tell me, when you die, if you go to 
heaven, you'll change planes in our airport. 

As you move about in the downtown area, right in the heart of 
the city you'll see a block with their signs in the window where 
the buildings are coming down. An anonymous donor gave us over 
$9,000,000 with which to purchase this block for the purpose of 
building a downtown park, and that tells you something about the 
people in this city and the faith and the confidence they have in them- 
selves and in the future. 

And in this city, despite all of its successes, we also have our 
problems, just like you do in yours. We too felt the growth in crime 
over recent months, and for that matter, the last two or three years. 
This was bringing fear to the streets of American cities; and so 
this city moved in overnight, increased the size of the police force 
by 33%, and increased salaries by 22%, with another 8% on top of 
that as a college incentive, and added the sophisticated equipment, 
like the helicopters and the computers, put in psychological testing, 
and properly assigned men to the job they can handle. And, I guess 
what I'm trying to tell you, that you are in a place which is very 
healthy. This is one of the success cities in America, and I'm proud 
of it. 

I've only been mayor for a short period of time, and I'm leaning 
on the foundation developed by my predecessors down through the 
years. I have a great deal of faith and confidence in these people of 
Atlanta and its future, and so it's a veiy exciting position for me, 
and you can't blame me for wanting to tell you about it. 

But in addition to this physical responsibility in growth and pros- 
perity, I'm proud to say our city is also morally healthy, and it is a 



The United Methodist Church 299 

city that really believes most sincerely in the digfnity of mankind. 
A city where the mayor spends as much of his time on human rela- 
tions problems as he does on all other problems put together. Not 
that problems are that big, but that the risk is that big, and that 
behooves the mayor of any growing city to be ahead of those prob- 
lems. 

This is the reason we have one of the most active Community Rela- 
tions Commissions in the country. This is the reason that we meet 
with blacks and whites together, we meet with the hippies and the 
senior citizens together, we meet with the college community and any 
other group that has a different outlook from a man across the table, 
to bring them together to show that in fact they have many similar 
outlooks. But I am not here to give a speech this morning, though 
I would surely love to, because this is such a distinguished audience 
that I would like to participate in some way. But this morning my 
opportunity is that of welcoming you. We are very pleased, as I said, 
to have you here. We are available by telephone through your local 
delegates from Atlanta, or just by walking into City Hall, for any- 
thing you need during your stay. 

I would point out that we have some very excellent shops, we have 
very good restaurants and some good entertainment. The Convention 
Bureau tells me the average visitor to Atlanta spends $48.33 per 
day, and we would like for you to do your part. Ours is a city that, 
as the Bishop explained, takes itself seriously but also wants to enjoy 
life. Ours is a city that has approximately 850 churches and syna- 
gogues representing some 43 denominations, with a total membership 
estimated at 750,000. We take our church life seriously. We are very 
pleased and very proud to have you here. We hope you don't wait 
another 80 or 90 years to come back, we hope you come back soon 
and often, both as a convention and as individuals. Thank you very 
much. 

Committee on Journal 

George R. Akers (Wyoming) reported that the Commit- 
tee on Journal had examined the journal for the previous 
day's session and found it in order. The report was received. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) : Mr. Chairman, members of 
the Conference, the Committee on Presiding Officers is pleased to 
announce that presiding at this evening's session will be Bishop Eric 
A. Mitchell of the Hyderabad Area and presiding at tomorrow's ses- 
sion will be Bishop D. Frederick Wertz of the West Virginia Area. 

Committee on Credentials 

W. T. Handy, Jr. (Louisiana), chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Credentials, stated that the committee had examined 
and approved the changes made in the seating of delegates 
as reported by the chairmen of the Annual Conference del- 
egations for the morning session, April 18, 1972. The report 
was adopted. 

Request for Judicial Council Ruling 

Mr. Handy outlined the situation with regard to two per- 
sons who had been elected as delegates to the General Con- 



300 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

ference by their Annual Conferences when they were 20 
years of age, but had reached the age of 21 before the 
General Conference convened. Subsequent to the time of 
their election the Judicial Council had ruled that lay dele- 
gates to General or Jurisdictional Conferences must be 21 
years of age at the time of their election. These two persons, 
Edith Spurr (Southern New England) and William Otwell 
(Southern California- Arizona), having been denied a seat 
in the Conference, had appeared before the Committee on 
Credentials. Mr. Handy moved that the case of the eligibility 
of these two persons be referred to the Judicial Council for 
a ruling to decide if the General Conference has a right to 
officially seat these and similarly situated persons as duly 
elected delegates. The motion was adopted. 

Richard 0. Johnson (California-Nevada) moved that the 
General Conference request the Judicial Council to recon- 
sider Decision No. 346. The motion was adopted. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) : Mr. Chairman, Council 
of Bishops, Members of the General Conference. I bring you greet- 
ings this morning and I read: "Greatly regret unable being with you. 
Present in prayer. God bless you richly." And this is from the 
Cuban Methodist Church signed by Bishop Armando Rodriguez. 

Mrs. Little moved that the Conference respond to the 
message. The motion was adopted. 

World Methodist Night 

/. Otis Young (West Ohio) made an announcement re- 
garding preparation for participants in the World Method- 
ist Night program. Norman L. Coyiard (General Confer- 
ence Business Manager) announced the plan to be followed 
in the seating of delegates and visitors for the World Meth- 
odist Night program. 

Commission on Entertainment and Program 

A. G. Jefferson (Virginia) introduced and presented to 
the Conference the members of the Commission on Enter- 
tainment and Program. 

Pilgrimages to Grave of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Edivard G. Carroll (Baltimore) moved that the Commis- 
sion on Entertainment and Program arrange with the local 
committee for the availability of transportation for periodic 
pilgrimages from the auditorium to the site of the grave of 
Martin Luther King, Jr. The motion was adopted. 



The United Methodist Church 301 

Question Regarding Judicial Council Referral 

Paid J. Beeman (Pacific Northwest) asked for the floor 
for the purpose of asking a question regarding the matter 
of delegate seating which the Conference had referred to 
the Judicial Council. The Chair ruled him out of order. 

Commission on Worship (see page 2073) 

Bishop Lance Webb (Illinois Area), chairman of the 
Commission on Worship, introduced the executive secretary 
of the Commission, Hoyt L. Hickman, and presented a re- 
port brochure summarizing the Commission's work. He ex- 
pressed appreciation for the assistance given by the Boards 
of Evangelism and Education and by The United Methodist 
Publishing House. 

Bishop Webb presented a new songbook, Ventures in 
Song, produced by the Commission and introduced its 
editor, David J. Randolph, Jr. (Staff, General Board of 
Evangelism). Mr. Randolvh made a statement about the 
preparation and contents of the songbook, expressing the 
hope that it would not only be useful as a hymnal or song- 
book, but also that it would stimulate new music in the 
church. He said that Ventures in Song should be perceived 
as a statement of faith and a theological affirmation, since 
theology was coming to be understood as something which 
is not only to be stated, but which must also be lived, sung, 
and danced. Bishop Webb announced the time and place for 
a liturgical celebration at which Ventures in Song would be 
dedicated and presented to the church. 

Carlton R. Yotmg (East Ohio) led the Conference in sing- 
ing the hymn, "They'll Know We Are Christians By Our 
Love." 

Presentation of New President, Council of Bishops 

Bishop Paul Hardin, Columbia Area, was granted the 
privilege of the floor for the purpose of presenting to the 
Conference the new president of the Council of Bishops, 
Bishop O. Eugene Slater, San Antonio Area. 

Bishop O. Eugene Slater: Mr. Chairman, Bishop Hardin, and dear 
Christian friends. The mood of my soul at this moment is a mood 
of gratitude. I'm grateful to God who brought me into being and 
who has sustained me across these years. I'm grateful for a great 
crowd of witnesses surrounding us on this occasion. Those witnesses 
are symbolized by these two emblems that I hold in my hand, which 
Bishop Hardin has just given me. I am grateful for the present 
generation of the people of God, the people who constitute the church, 
of which we are a part, and the church universal. I am grateful 
to the Council of Bishops and the confidence expressed in me by 
bringing me into this presidency of the Council. I am grateful to my 
beloved and distinguished predecessor, Bishop Paul Hardin, who has 
guided us so wisely and widely across the days of this past year, 



302 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

and I hope that as he transmits to me these tools of our office, that 
he will also give me some of the skill and grace with which he has 
presided over our body. 

I feel a very deep sense of inadequacy as I come to this respon- 
sibility, but I remember an old promise contained in the Scripture, 
"As thy days, so shall thy strength be." And I claim the fulfillment 
of that promise, as I undertake the responsibilities that my fellow 
bishops have given to me. Here and now, I commit myself anew to 
Christ and to the church of which we are all a part, and I pray 
that I shall be a faithful servant of presiding over the meetings 
of our Council of Bishops and pray that both you and I will be faith- 
ful in the task that God has assigned to us. Thank you. 

Recess 

Announcements were made by the Secretary, J. Wesley 
Hole. The Conference was in recess for fifteen minutes. 
Carlton R. Young led the Conference in the singing of the 
hymn, "Love Come A-Tricklin' Down." 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) announced that word 
had been received of the death of the father of Alvin Lind- 
gren (Wisconsin) . Mrs. Little moved that the Conference 
send a message of condolence ; the motion was adopted. 

Committee on Fraternal Delegates 

Harvey H. Potthoff (Rocky Mountain) : Bishop Nichols, Council of 
Bishops, delegates of the General Conference, and other friends: In 
his sermon on the catholic spirit John Wesley spoke of those fellow 
Christians with whom we are one in heart. He spoke of the Christian 
of catholic spirit as one who loves as friends, as brethren in the 
Lord, as members of Christ and children of God, all of whatever 
opinion or worship or congregation, who believe in the Lord Jesus 
Christ, who love God and man. In that spirit we welcome our distin- 
guished fraternal delegates, coming to us from the Roman Catholic 
Church and from the churches participating in the Consultation on 
Church Union. 

With us are not only the representatives of the participating 
churches in the Consultation but also the chairman of the Consultation 
on Church Union. As the name of each fraternal delegate is an- 
nounced, he will stand and we will ask you to withhold your applause 
until those representing the various member churches of the Con- 
sultation have been presented. Following this, we shall have the privi- 
lege of hearing from the chairman of the Consultation on Church 
Union and the representatives of the Catholic Bishops' Committee for 
Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs. And so it is now my privilege 
to present to you, representing first the African Methodist Episcopal 
Church, Bishop William R. Wilkes of the Third Episcopal District, 
Cleveland, Ohio. Representing the African Methodist Episcopal 
Church Zion, the Rev. H. E. Haggler, pastor of the First Methodist 
Church, Fayetteville, North Carolina. Representing the Christian 
Church, Disciples of Christ, Dr. A. Dale Fiers, general minister and 
president, Indianapolis, Indiana. Representing the Christian Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, the Rev. Othal H. Lakey, pastor of the Cedar 
Crest Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, Dallas, Texas. Repre- 



The United Methodist Church 303 

senting the Episcopal Church, the Rt. Reverend Milton E. Wood, 
suffragan bishop of Atlanta. Representing the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States, Dr. Lawrence I. Stell, executive secretary of the 
General Council, Atlanta, Georgia. Representing the United Church 
of Christ, Dr. W. J. Andes, conference minister, Southeast Confer- 
ence, Atlanta, Georgia. Representing the United Presbyterian Church, 
Dr. William P. Thompson, Stated Clerk, Philadelphia, Pa. Will you 
greet all these friends now as a group? 

Consultation on Church Union — George G. Beazley, Jr. 

George G. Beazley, Jr. (Chairman, COCU) : I want to express my 
great joy at being asked to come and speak to you about the Con- 
sultation on Church Union, a subject on which I am always anxious 
to speak, and to say that never have I received more overwhelming 
hospitality than I have from Harvey Potthoff and the members of his 
Committee, as they have welcomed us here. 

When I was pastor at Bartlesville, Oklahoma, I had a lady in the 
congregation, who when she was asked the question, "How do you 
feel, Mrs. Nodie?" always replied, "I'm doing very well by the grace 
of God in a strong backfield." Whatever may be your judgment about 
the grace of God in what I am going to say to you today, there 
is no doubt I have got a strong backfield. 

In a time of centralism, such as the 1940s and the 1950s, the 
greatest danger any church body faces is that it will become bureau- 
cratic, unaware of the life concerns of the grass roots. In a time of 
localism, such as the 1960s and the 1970s, the greatest danger any 
body faces is that it will become provincial, unaware of the wholisms 
of life, its broad and sweeping contrasts. I grew up in Kentucky, 
and as my dear friend, Roy Short, knows well, I love horses. Indeed, 
I grew up on the back of one. 

Anyone who has ridden very much knows that most horses have a 
tendency to bear either right or left, especially if they have been 
show horses, as this one had. When a horse naturally pulls to the right 
or to the left, you have to keep tugging at the opposite rein. Today 
all of us who are leaders in the church are riding a horse that bears 
toward provincialism. It is a part of the acculturation of our time. 
The American church is fortunate in such a period to have some 
bodies which will not allow it to settle into provincialism, that by 
their very existence compel us to stretch our horizons — bodies like 
the General Conference of The United Methodist Church and its 
sister bodies, even more comprehensive bodies like the National Coun- 
cil of Churches and the World Council of Churches and the Bilateral 
Roman Catholic Conversations, and bodies which open new visions 
of unity, like the Consultation on Church Union, in which you United 
Methodists have played so large a part. 

It is as Chairman of that Consultation on Church Union that I 
bring you greetings today from all the Protestant and Anglican 
Churches in the Consultation, not only from the nine participating 
churches who are represented here this morning, but also from the 
twenty-three observing churches and church groups of which the 
Roman Catholic Church is one. Let me say a word about the provin- 
cialism from which the Consultation delivers us; then, let me tell 
you how you may help deliver the Consultation from its provincial- 
isms. For no living self-conscious body, whether a person, an organiza- 
tion, a church, or a group of churches can ever completely escape 
from provincialism, or even partially overcome it without continual 
effort. It is not hard to achieve localism. It is doing what comes 
naturally. Federalism, cosmopolitanism, unity and union are fragile 
achievements difficultly achieved and preserved only by constant vigi- 
lance. 



304 Journal of the 1072 General Conference 

The first provincialism from which the Consultation on Church 
Union can deliver us is waspishness. Let me make it quite clear that 
I am a male WASP and that I make no apologies for the basic 
things for which those initials stand, even as I repent of the sin 
which accompanies this and every finiteness. As to race, I am by 
convention white, though how any sane man can designate my rosy 
complexion so, is a mystery. Most of my blood lines are British, 
though I can see the irritation of my Scotch-Irish grandfather, who 
was one of the great influences in my life, if anyone had called that 
kilt Anglo-Saxon. Conventionally, I am a Protestant, though in my 
Kentucky way I usually describe the Christian Church Disciples of 
Christ as a foal out of a Presbyterian mare by an Anglican stallion. 

As a Church we have many Catholic elements, of which our weekly 
communion and our definition of the Church are only two. I do this 
somewhat tedious analysis of my WASP heritage only to show that 
I am a person, not a class, and that any abstraction like WASP, while 
useful and necessary for thought, is always a caricature that blurs 
the rich variety and particularity with which God endows life. 
WASPS built most of the basic institutions of this country merely 
because they were the dominant majority in the earliest period, and 
these institutions are, despite their weaknesses, one of the most 
magnificent heritages in world culture. However, these very particu- 
larities which make us human, as do my sub-WASP particulars like 
maleness, Discipleness, middle-age, Kentucky ancestry, clergy voca- 
tion, and so forth, tend to make us provincial. 

We cannot and should not be delivered from them, but we can, and 
should, transcend them. The Consultation on Church Union has helped 
me in that difficult effort for transcendence. I think it has helped my 
fellow delegates, too, in transcending their particularities, like Meth- 
odism, blackness, femaleness, youth, lay vocation, and so forth. The 
Consultation has brought predominantly black churches and predomi- 
nantly white churches into a dialogue which is concrete and which 
seeks to overcome these racial and cultural pi'ovincialisms, both by 
faith and order unities, and by the action and the structure which 
will prevent either racial group from exercising dominating power. 

As far as I know no other effort in the United States has sought 
to deal with these divisions in so intimate a manner, and to overcome 
them structurally. In the process, most of us have also come to a 
better understanding of the minorities within our present churches 
which I am firmly sure could have not have been mine if I had not 
been confronted with black churchmen from predominantly black 
churches. 

As I look at you, though I see dear friends like Roy Nichols, and 
though I recognize the German element in former EUB's like my 
close friends Paul Washburn and Reuben Mueller, you are primarily 
WASP. John Wesley was certainly a WASP, even with one of an 
Anglican element. I take it if you really engage in the local, district 
and conference dialogue which the Consultation is encouraging, you 
will find real help in escaping from your WASP provincialism. Sec- 
ondly, I was a local pastor for 22 years, twice the time I have been 
a denominational bureaucrat, and nobody — but nobody — can make 
me sell short the ministry in the local church. 

It is one of the rare privileges, as well as one of the most gosh- 
awful pain-in-the-neckness, of life. But just as my present job has 
certain built-in provincialisms which require solid and continuous 
efforts to escape, so does the local ministry, either in its lay or clergy 
form. The last pastorate which I served was in Bartlesville, Okla., 
where I ministered for 13% years. Bartlesville was then the head- 
quarters and research center for two of America's largest oil com- 



The United Methodist Church 305 

panics and was reputed to have the highest education per capita of 
any city in America. 

Since I was constantly struggling to widen my own horizons and 
those of my people, both through the Christian Gospel and through 
the worldwide and cultural nature of the Church; and since, there- 
fore, I assumed I had not been conformed to the particularities of 
that very management culture, one of the greatest shocks I had when 
I came to the present job was the realization of how many presup- 
positions of that environment that I had come to accept, even those 
which were contrary to my original training and heritage. A pastor 
has to identify with his people if he is to lead them. 

Nonetheless, both lay and clergymen must beware of falling victim 
to the provincialisms of their local church orientation. The Consulta- 
tion delivers us from this provincialism in two ways. It insists that 
action and structure must be rooted in faith and that the Christian 
faith has a real objective content. And it insists that structure must 
be rooted in a real and undiscardable Biblical order. 

It also delivers us from the provincialism of the local church by 
forcing us to restudy our own tradition and the traditions of other 
participating and observing churches in the light of our common 
scriptural and liturgical traditions. By and large the local church 
life, and even denominational life and the National Council of 
Churches, neglect the examination of the faith in a serious way. This 
is illustrated by the fact that most of the responses to A Plan of 
Union which have come in tend to concentrate on Chapter 8, the 
chapter on organization, and to neglect the first seven chapters, which 
deal with faith and order. 

Most of our denominational experience does not give us a good 
comprehension of even our own tradition, let alone an appreciation 
of other traditions. If Methodists are like Disciples they can describe 
their church in ways which utterly betray the principles of their 
founding fathers. The Consultation process forces us to be more 
aware of our own tradition and of other traditions and of the tradi- 
tion of Christ's Church. 

The last provincialism from which the Consultation on Church 
Union can deliver us is polarization. One of the things which we 
have already learned from the responses to A Plan of Union is that 
both extremes in the churches are apt to reject the Consultation on 
Church Union. 

This is understandable since the Consultation seeks to be inclusive 
in every way, and the most provincial groups now existing in these 
United States are those who have settled for polarization. 

In my opinion nothing recommends the consultation process like 
its refusal to settle either for the values of the past or to become a 
"now" movement. The Consultation knows there is a gospel with a 
given content and it understands that that gospel tells what God 
did for man's salvation in the first century in the birth, life, death 
and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth, through whom God became 
man for our salvation in a particular and unrepeatable event. This 
effort also knows that the Risen Christ is still in his body the church 
and that that gospel must be related to our lives and our societies 
and our times. 

The Consultation knows that the future is God's also and through 
his Holy Spirit God will claim it by means of him who is not only 
the Alpha but also the Omega. The thing which frightens me most 
about our present mood is the antirational movement which lays so 
much emphasis on feeling and action that they do not see the necessity 
for hard theological thought. 

Of course, I should be equally frightened by a sterile-rationalism 
that forgot to have its heart strangely warmed and that did not 



306 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

have a strong alignment of action with the dispossessed which was 
characteristic of your principal founding father John Wesley. How- 
ever, I think we have been warned against this latter abuse until 
there is very little chance of us falling victim to it. I think we 
should treasure the real intellectuals of the church, like your own 
Albert Outler, Walter Muelder, and John Deschner, to name only 
three of many. The Consultation has tried to wed thought and action 
m a vital faith. 

It can deliver us from the parochialism of polarization. 
As you must know through the work of Bob Huston, one of the 
ablest ecumenical officers in the trade, the Consultation on Church 
Union prepared one of the great documents of recent church history. 
This was done during the chairmanship of your own Jim Matthews. 
I had the pleasure of working with your sensitive Paul Washburn 
and your analytic Dick Cain and with that fantastically able layman 
Paul Hardin, Jr. on A Plan of Union. Between May, 1970, when that 
plan was committed to the churches for study and response and 
June 1, 1972, when we are supposed to be analyzing that plan in 
inter-church and denominational study, we are supposed to be com- 
mending those propositions which seem to help Christ's mission and 
offering alternative solutions to those problems which do not. 

It is only through thoughtful and perceptive response from the 
local churches and the denominations that the Consultation can deliver 
itself from drawing on too small a base of insight. You hold the key 
to unlock those chains. If you have not already done so through a 
response, rush to the dungeon and deliver us! We have been singing 
the hymns of the Lord, but only God working through you can cause 
those binding chains of our provincialism to drop away. One pro- 
vincialism that has plagued the Consultation we lost at our Denver 
plenary, when our general secretary stirred us to look beyond our, 
up to then necessary, fixation on A Plan of Union to the process 
which produced it. 

Unfortunately, some people have hailed this orientation as a de- 
liverance from the tedious and time consuming task of perfecting 
protoconstitution of Plan of Union. Paul Crow never intended his 
proposals to be so used. There are no primrose paths of dalliance 
to union and to the realization of that for which the Lord prayed. 
It is only by hard work of union that the world can be brought 
to believe. Churches do not drift nor emote in the mission of union. 
The responses that have already come into Princeton, however, make 
us realize that we may have to walk a longer road than we had 
originally thought. 

The Chapter on Structure will have to be radically re-written. 
The ideas in it were not developed enough, to use a Catholic phrase, 
"for articulation." It seems probable that we shall have to deal with 
the congregation more seriously than we have done. We are finding 
the truth of Sidney Mead's observation that in the United States all 
churches are congregational even when they have a strong connection- 
alism as you have. 

In the meantime how shall we be sustained as we turn back into 
the Sinaitic Desert and cannot yet enter the Promised Land? Interim 
Eucharistic fellowship is certainly one way. Action together in clus- 
tering our agencies and units is another. Acquaintance through allow- 
ing our traditions to interpenetrate and through lives of prayer 
together is one more. What we must not do is, to listen to those who 
scout out the land and tell us that we can never take it. The Joshuas 
and the Calebs are far more trustworthy reporters. God will give 
us the Promised Land of union if we trust in Him and are not 
weary in well-doing. I bring you greetings from the most exciting 



The United Methodist Church 307 

venture in American church life and the least provincial, The Con- 
sultation on Church Union. Thank you. 

Letter from the Vatican 

Harvey H. Potthoff (Rocky Mountain), chairman of the 
Committee on Fraternal Delegates, called on the Secretary 
of the General Conference to read a letter received from J. 
Cardinal Villot, Office of the Secretary of State, The Vati- 
can, dated July 14, 1971. 

/. Wesley Hole: In response to the certified copy of the Resolution 
of Intent — which was transmitted to the Vatican at the request of 
the Theological Study Commission in the Fall of 1970 — this letter 
was received, addressed to me as Secretary of the General Confer- 
ence: 

"I have the honor to inform you that the Holy Father has received 
with deep Christian joy through Cardinal Willebrands a copy of the 
solemn and unanimous Resolution of Intent passed recently by the 
General Conference of The United Methodist Church in the United 
States. By this generous and far-sighted action you disavow not 
honorable history of the Methodist Christian witness but the bitter- 
ness and harsh controversy which in the past has so often affected 
in Christians even their zeal for the Gospel of Christ. At the same 
time you offer in this Resolution 'tokens of the effort to repair the 
ancient breeches of charity and mutual understanding' — the effort 
which, in these happier days, all of us feel is a part of our very 
faithfulness to Christ our Lord and which was expressed many times 
in the Second Vatican Council. 

"So clearly does the gospel point to the effort of reconciliation in 
love as a solemn obligation, that we can but marvel and mourn that 
prejudice has so long obscured it from so many Christians. For does 
not Christ couple the love of our neighbor for God's sake with the 
love of God above all things, which is 'the great and first Command- 
ment,' Matthew 22:36-39. And the Beloved Disciple himself, develop- 
ing these sublime words of His Master, exhorts us, 'Beloved, let us 
love one another; for love is of God, and he who loves is born of God 
and knows God. He who does not love does not know God; for God 
is love.' I John 4:7-8. 

"The Holy Father remembers with deep thankfulness that The 
United Methodist Church was second to none in the seriousness and 
the assiduousness with which it responded to the invitation of the 
Second Vatican Council to send observers to the sessions of that 
Assembly. Thus were forged many warm friendships. Thus were 
thrown open new windows of mutual understanding. Thus, above 
all, was sown the seed from which sprang the dialogue between the 
Roman Catholic Church and the World Methodist Council which, 
held officially for the past four years, has been echoed in many places 
and has borne fruit, of which the Resolution of your General Con- 
ference is so noble an example. 

"This dialogue has brought us an understanding of many Christian 
treasures which Methodists and Catholics share. At the heart of 
these there appears an intense conviction of the fullness of divine 
mercy, of the efficacy of Christ's saving work, and of the reality of 
God's grace. Hence, we share a high ambition of 'scriptural holi- 
ness,' — a personal continuous disciplined growth in conformity to 
Christ — which finds its setting in the social reality of the church com- 
mitted to the Gospel for the service of the world. Hence, we join also 
in girding ourselves to the task of fulfilling John Wesley's own injunc- 



308 Journal of the 1972 Ge^ieral Conference 

tion: 'Do all the good you can in all the ways you can as long as you 
can.' 

"The Pope is keenly aware of the prospects for the future opened 
by the Resolution of Intent in regard to the reinterpretation of the 
Articles of the Book of Discipline. In harmony with the Second Vat- 
ican Council, he would express the hope that deeper study enlightened 
by the grace of God and continuing fraternal dialogue may serve to 
bring about a more adequate understanding and common formulation 
of those doctrines on which The United Methodist Church and the 
Catholic Church as yet have no full agreement and particularly with 
regard to the Eucharistic ministry. This consideration stirs up the 
hope that as a fruit of fervent prayer through mutual esteem and 
comprehension — to which your action witnesses — the dialog-ue so hap- 
pily begun will make it possible to overcome the differences that still 
exist between us. 

"Today at the center of our effort for good there must be a 
renewal of our dedication to the search for that unity which Christ 
wills for His Church. Your General Conference's Resolution cannot 
but serve as a spur to this renewal to Methodists and Catholics 
alike. His Holiness thanks you from his heart and prays that God 
will bless the further efforts of those who seek tirelessly for recon- 
ciliation in the Lord. Sincerely yours in Christ, Cardinal Villot" who 
is the Secretary of State of the Vatican. 

Mr. Potthoff moved that the letter be referred to the 
Commission on Ecumenical Affairs for appropriate re- 
sponse ; the motion was adopted. 

Catholic Bishops' Committee for Ecumenical and Interre- 
ligious Affairs 

Mr. Potthoff introduced the Most Reverend James W. 
Malone, Bishop of Youngstown, Ohio, representative of the 
Catholic Bishops' Committee for Ecumenical and Interre- 
ligious Affairs. 

Bishop Malone: Thank you very much. Bishop Nichols, Dr. Potthoff, 
my dear friends : I thank you for the cordiality of your welcome and 
the courtesy of your invitation and the genuineness of this complimen- 
tary introduction. It is a pleasure for me to bring fraternal greetings 
to your General Conference from the National Conference of Catholic 
Bishops. As you may perhaps already know, our Catholic bishops met 
here in Atlanta last week. 

Our agenda, like your own, included many and varied items, all 
of them concerned with the welfare of the church. Among them was 
the topic concerning the possibility of ordaining women as Catholic 
priests, as well as the separate topic of balancing our conference 
budget. We were quite interested the next day to read the newspaper 
headlines that attempted to summarize all that we had done during 
the preceding day's agenda. The headline said: "Bishops Fret Over 
Women and Money." 

Hopeful that your Methodist concerns will be interpreted in less 
exciting fashion, I am happy to recall at the outset of my remarks 
several leaders of this Conference with whom I have enjoyed en- 
couraging ecumenical relationships over many years. From my home 
state of Ohio, Bishop Ensley and Bishop Kearns; from our national 
ecumenical dialogue. Dr. Huston and Bishop Paul Washburn; from 
our international ecumenical dialogue, Dr. Outler, Bishop Cannon, 



The United Methodist Church g09 

and Bishop Fred Pierce Corson. With all these Christian leaders from 
the Methodist Church, I have often shared prayer and study and 
work for the building up of the Kingdom. 

It is a genuine pleasure to be with them again as well as with other 
friends here, unnamed, and with all of you who extend your hands to 
me today in Christian fellowship. 

In bringing fraternal greetings from the Roman Catholic communi- 
ty, I hope to share with you my conviction that many activities in 
your church and mine testify to a flourishing ecumenical movement 
among us. Further, I should like to remark as well on some of the 
qualities which properly mark our joint ecumenical endeavors. 

First of all, I am an unabashed optimist about ecumenism. I 
believe that our prayers for Christian unity will one day be answered. 
The Holy Spirit has given the travel reservations for us to come 
together. The Spirit has given me the urge to travel ; we have only 
to supply our map. And whatever the route, and however long the 
journey, Christ will be finally our point of convergence. 

How long the journey will take is known only to God, but there 
are bright beacons lighting the way and strong tail winds for propel- 
ling us forward. A prime example of our new thrust is the letter 
from Rome, just read by Dr. Hole, written in the name of Pope 
Paul in response to the Resolution of Intent passed by your General 
Conference. The exchange is inspirational, one which could not have 
taken place just a few short years ago. I congratulate you for taking 
the initiative in drawing us Roman Catholics and you United Meth- 
odists closer together. 

Your charity, the charity of Christ, urges on. That same charity, 
I think, prompts you to invite me, a Roman Catholic bishop, as a 
fraternal delegate to your Conference. As a young priest twenty-five 
years ago, I would have found incredible the prediction that some 
day my ecumenical conversations would go beyond my own living 
room, where I often socialize with my many Methodist relatives. I 
could never have envisioned this moment, and I marvel at the events 
of the last ten years v/hich make it possible. 

My optimism over the ecumenical progress we have made stems 
not from fantasy, but from fact. The world and national bilateral 
Methodist-Catholic dialogues, in which I have had an opportunity to 
participate, have not made as many headlines. There have been no 
dramatic breakthroughs which sweep away our differences, but I 
think such dialogues have at least helped us to discover our common 
heritage in the spiritual life. 

Any initial threat which we Roman Catholics and you Methodists 
have that we were really out to convert or assimilate one another, 
this has been dispelled. Initial mistrust arising, perhaps, from the 
unfounded fear that we were trying to score propaganda points for 
our respective churches, this also has disappeared. Any disrespect 
which we may once have had toward doctrinal differences has largely 
evaporated. Instead, the Holy Spirit has given us a new understanding 
of each other. Stripped of religious ghetto mentalities and defensive 
attitudes, we Roman Catholics and you Methodists have begun to 
perceive each other as human beings, replete with frailties and foibles, 
it is true, but human beings hungering, longing and searching for 
the very same Christ. 

The Holy Spirit has led us to the discovery that we are in the 
same spiritual wave length, and it is a heartening discovery in a 
world where so many hunger for this realization. The fact that we 
have discovered our spiritual kinship will probably be reflected again 
in the new national Ecumenical Dialogue between Methodists and 
Roman Catholics on the topic of "Holiness in Ministry." 



310 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Bishop Paul Washburn of this Conference and I are co-chairmen 
of this dialogue, which involves eight distinguished theologians from 
our two churches. It is acknowledged that emphasis on holiness in 
ministry is theologically and historically apt for both churches in 
the dialogue. To date we have met once. Presently, theological reflec- 
tions on the topic are being readied for our second meeting in the 
Fall. Prayerfully, we open our hearts to where the Spirit may lead 
us. 

Other indicators that the ecumenical concern is moving along are 
the separate Roman Catholic dialogues in which Roman Catholics 
are now engaged in on a world basis. These are with the Anglicans, 
Lutheran and Reformed Churches, and on a national basis, between 
Roman Catholics and Lutherans, Episcopalians, Orthodox, Disciples 
of Christ, and Baptists. The recent agreed statement on the Eucharist 
by Roman Catholic and Anglican theologians is a hopeful sign. 

True, this statement is a study document and not officially adopted 
by either church, but I think it serves as an example that our ecu- 
menical dialogues are not mere vei-bal gymnastics, but are a practical 
means of clarifying differences and discovering similarities. Another 
ecumenical advance, not directly involving Roman Catholics, is the 
presentation made to you this morning by Dr. Beazley, in behalf of 
the Consultation on Church Union. The combined forces of nine 
member churches into a Church of Christ Uniting, with twenty-five 
million members, would strengthen the witness of the Body of Christ. 
I congratulate you Methodists for your eff"orts toward that goal, and 
I pray that your zeal to bring Christ to all men will sweep away 
any roadblocks which presently stand in the way of this route to 
reunion. 

Another green light for ecumenism concerns principally Roman 
Catholics. In my judgment, the Catholic Church's growing in good 
relationship with the National Council of Churches augurs well to 
the future. My fellow bishops last year responded to the invitation to 
appoint five Catholics to the National Council's Faith and Order 
Commission. Today a nun and a Jesuit priest are paid staff members 
of that Commission. Catholic bishops are currently pondering possible 
Catholic membership in the National Council of Churches. And there 
are still other reasons why I am optimistic about contemporary 
ecumenism. 

For example, the words, "heretics," "dissidents," and "schismatics" 
have been dropped from Catholic vocabularies. Protestant and Cath- 
olic Scripture scholars cooperated in translating the New American 
Bible, and they are drafting common texts of prayers, including the 
Apostles' Creed and the Lord's Prayer. What we Catholics used to 
refer to as "the Protestant ending" of the Lord's Prayer has become 
a standard part of our prayer at Mass. And in the sensitive area of 
interchurch marriages, recent changes enable Catholics and Protes- 
tants to marry in each other's churches without jeopardizing their 
status in their own church. 

These are but a few of the ecumenical gains which provide evidence 
that the Holy Spirit is working through us to end suspicion, aliena- 
tion, and hostility and is making us more aware of Christ's entreaty 
to love one another as he loves us. 

Yet, despite all these evidences, I sense that some of my Protestant 
friends feel that among Roman Catholics the ecumenical thrust of 
the Second Vatican Council may be running out of steam. If my 
analysis is correct, certain Protestants feel that Catholics are so 
divided on so many issues that we cannot agree on Catholic unity, 
much less work toward Christian unity. And some of you may fear 
that a reaction is setting in among Roman Catholics, and the changing 
Catholic Church of the '60s and '70s is about to revert to the change- 



The United Methodist Church 311 

less church of the 1940s. It js concerning these possible fears that 
I want to comment briefly. 

An example of how we Roman Catholics have changed liturgically 
immediately comes to mind. As you know, the vernacular has replaced 
Latin as the language of the Mass. In one Ohio parish a group of 
parishioners loudly lamented to the pastor the disappearance of the 
Latin Mass, and they said, "If only there was one Mass in Latin in 
the city, then Catholics dissatisfied with the change would have the 
consolation of worshipping in the manner they had so long been 
accustomed to." The obliging pastor scheduled a Latin Mass in prime 
time on Sunday morning and announced that as long as attendance 
warranted, it would be offered in Latin. 

The first Sunday about seventy-five persons attended; the next 
Sunday, about fifty; and each succeeding Sunday, a little less. Finally, 
after six weeks only a half-dozen persons came to this special Mass. 
In contrast, the other Sunday morning Masses in English attracted 
more than a thousand persons. 

This example, of course, is not to say that seven years after the 
Vatican Council's blueprint for renewal was published that debate 
over renewal in its many dimensions has subsided in my church. On 
the contrary, issues which we Catholics once thought were settled 
centuries ago are the center of lively controversy. Changes in the 
Catholic Church have become as popular a topic as the war, the 
Primary Elections, and even the I.T.T. Celibacy, the Papacy, the 
ordination of women, singing in church, and, worst of all, my friends, 
they're even questioning the authority of Catholic bishops. All these, 
all these are topics for barbershop conversation. 

To the ecumenical movement these internal Catholic squabbles may 
be a blessing in disguise, for they are teaching us Roman Catholics 
to distinguish between divine precepts and man made disciplines. We 
are learning about those things which can be changed without doing 
violence to the gospel. We are learning to live with diversity of 
thought and opinion while maintaining a unity. I believe this accep- 
tance of diversity is an important prerequisite, helping our ecumenical 
efforts to bear fruit. 

In the remarks that I have prepared for this assembly I want, 
also, to indicate that because of these many and meaningful activities 
in your church and mine I am persuaded that the ecumenical move- 
ment is flourishing among us. I am optimistic about ecumenism, and 
I had intended at this point to turn your attention to the principal 
qualities which properly mark our joint ecumenical endeavors. I was 
about to suggest first that we need spiritual ecumenism and then, 
secondly, that we must extend that spiritual ecumenism so that it 
will be a lived ecumenism. 

Instead of developing these remarks, in view of the hour of the 
morning, may I conclude my remarks to you on this happy occasion 
by saying that there is none among us who can predict the future 
of the ecumenical movement between Roman Catholics and United 
Methodists in our generation. There is none among us who would 
want to soft-pedal the fact that while we find ourselves in agreement 
on many things, other issues still divide us. But we should not wait 
for perfect accord on every tenet of our faith before we address 
ourselves to the perplexing problems of our society. Together let us 
respond as Christians to all of our suffering brothers. A world filled 
with war, hate, and crime needs to be shown what Christians mean 
by peace. A world beset by poverty and injustice needs to learn 
what Christians mean by sharing. A world racked by loneliness needs 
to discover what Christians mean by fulfillment. A world plagued by 
the idea that God is dead needs to know that our common faith is 
very much alive. 



312 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

I pledge, and I invite you to join with me, in concentrating' on our 
own spiritual renewal so that our ecumenism will live rather than 
languish, and then let the Holy Spirit lead us where he may. I thank 
you. 

Mr. Potthojf presented Bishops Shy and Merchanson of 
the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church. He invited all 
fraternal delegates to remain as long as their schedules 
would permit. 

Commission on Religion and Race (See page 1836) 

The Chair recognized Bishop W. Kenneth Goodson (Bir- 
mingham Area), president of the Commission on Religion 
and Race. Bishop Goodson outlined the background of the 
establishment of the Commission by the 1968 General Con- 
ference and the tasks assigned to it at that time. He noted 
the new responsibility given the Commission by the 1970 
General Conference with the establishment and funding of 
the Minority Group Self-Determination program. Woodie 
W. White (Detroit), Executive Secretary of the Commis- 
sion, was introduced. 

Woodie W. White: Thank you. Bishop Goodson, Members of this 
Conference. I think you need to observe that the chairman of the 
Commission on Religion and Race is the bishop, the episcopal leader, 
of the Birmingham area. He has introduced me as the executive sec- 
retary of that Commission. I was born in the heart of Harlem on 
136th Street and Lenox Avenue; that's a long way from Alabama. 
And, yet, through these four years a Christian from the heart of 
Harlem could join hands with a Christian from Alabama and attempt 
to work as one in the name of God. 

Somewhere along the way in this country we said that God made 
a mistake when he created the human family as he did. We said that 
he made a mistake when he created black men and brown men and 
red men and yellow men. We don't believe he made a mistake; we 
think he knew exactly what he was doing. Because some have acted 
as though God did not know what he was doing, wars have been 
created. They have been created in such a way that men of different 
colors, different hair textures, could not even worship in the same 
place together, could not even sit together and discuss common prob- 
lems. 

We in the Commission on Religion and Race have been attempting 
to bring the diversity of pluralism of this United Methodist Church 
together as one family. We think that we in The United Methodist 
Church have the opportunity to show the world, and certainly to 
show this nation, how in our pluralism we can live together. For I 
remind you that The United Methodist Church represents the most 
ethnically and racially inclusive Protestant body in this country. Now 
we must begin to act and behave and relate like God would have us 
do. I'm grateful for the opportunity to have had a chance to work with 
this Commission and to work with many of you. I've even got more 
gray hair now than I had in '68. Thank you for that. But I hope that 
if anything has happened that my faith has been increased because 
I believe, no matter what they say on the right or what they say on 
the left, I believe it is God's will that we must be one United 
Methodist Church. 



The United Methodist Church 313 

Mr. White introduced other members of the Commission 
staff: Isabel Goynez (Rio Grande), James L. Jones (North 
Mississippi) , and Clayton E. Hanunond (Peninsula) . 

Bishop G^oodson introduced Joseph E. Lowery (North 
Georgia) , a member of the Commission, for the presentation 
of the report. 

Mr. Lowery: It is true that for all our shortcomings The United 
Methodist Church represents the most ethnically pluralistic Protes- 
tant church in America, and therein lies the strength of Methodism. 
For this racial and ethnic diversity affords our church an opportunity 
to lead the world in developing authentic community that no other 
denomination has. It could be as stated in Esther that The United 
Methodist Church has come to the Kingdom for just such a time as 
this, to provide that authentic community where both diversity and 
unity are blessed as essential ingredients of brotherhood. 

To begin our report we would like to present three persons for very 
brief statements regarding the work of the commission during the 
past quadrennium. They will come in this order, the Reverend Paul 
Hagiya from the Asian-American community, the Reverend Robert 
Pinezaddleby from the Indian community and the Reverend Hector 
Navas, the secretary of the Commission, from the Hispanic commu- 
nity, in that order. 

Paul H. Hagiya (Rocky Mountain) : First of all I want to make an 
apology; I certainly am a poor example to be representing all Asian- 
American Methodists of this great church of ours, and I know that 
I cannot speak wholly and fully for the Asian, like the Korean- 
American Methodists and the Chinese-American Methodists, and the 
Filipino-American Methodists and the Japanese-American Method- 
ists. And also may I apologize to the delegates and friends who 
come from foreign lands, especially from Asia. I know that you 
could present a cause for the Asians better than I could, but may I 
just as a representative of the Commission on Religion and Race 
give something of the thankfulness within our hearts for the Com- 
mission on Religion and Race that you created four years ago. 

Let me back up a second to think about the Asian-American 
Methodists. We came into being in the 1800's in San Francisco when 
our parents came over as immigrants brought over by you folks to 
work in the railroads as coolies and in the mines and in the fields of 
the Western Jurisdiction. And it was because of real deep committed 
and dedicated missionaries that came down to teach our parents En- 
glish and felt that we were not coolies but that we were children 
of God, so that we became Christians and Methodists. 

And I think all of you know that as far as Protestantism is con- 
cerned among the Asian-Americans, The Methodist Church has the 
most members among our group, and it was because of these dedi- 
cated Christian people. Not only the missionaries, but through the 
years we have had such loving care by our Bishops' Council of the 
Western Jurisdiction and other friends that have been our loyal sup- 
porters, and we were a vibrant church. And then came Pearl Harbor 
and the American concentration camps — and I want to say to you, 
not with any kind of hatred or feeling about that concentration camp 
experience, because I cherish being an alumni of the American con- 
centration camp — but anyway our churches were disintegrated, and 
we went to camp, all hopes lost, but then when we were allowed to go 
back to the West Coast we tried to pick up the pieces to rebuild 
these churches of ours — the ethnic churches along the coast. 

We thought that the answer for building a better church was to 



314 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

integrate and we did that. But then I reported to you at the St. Louis 
General Conference about being swallowed up, and I think some of 
you EUB's and the other minorities feel just what I'm talking about 
now. But anyway we saw our churches, the Asian churches in the 
Methodist Church, struggling and so disillusioned with so much pes- 
simism and hopelessness. But then came the Commission on Religion 
and Race, thank God for it, through your choice, your inspiration of 
bringing about the Commission on Religion and Race in this great 
United Methodist Church. And because of that Commission we Asian- 
American Methodists have been given a new lease on life. We have 
been blessed and we have been uplifted in our hearts and in our 
morale, and we have finally come to the feeling that we are a part 
of you, that we are a part of The United Methodist Church whether 
we have slant eyes or eat with chop sticks. We are fellow Methodists 
and fellow Christians. 

And I think the biggest thing the Commission on Religion and 
Race has done for us Asian Americans is, to find our own identity, 
not to try to fit into the shoes of your white upper class, middle, not 
only economic but social status, but just to be, I said, just to be 
children of God and to be members of the Methodist Church. I think 
that is the most important thing that is brought to the Asian- 
American Methodist. 

And then there are other blessings that have come because the 
Commission on Religion and Race was created by you folks. Today 
we have for the first time an official relationship with the Kyodan 
of Japan. Of all the years that we have been with your church and 
The Methodist Church and with Oriental faces, for the first time 
we have an official relationship, a working relationship on our own, 
that we can call language ministries of Japan. For there are a lot 
of other things that we would like to say, but even today we in the 
Western Jurisdiction of Asian-American Methodism even dream about 
one day having an Asian-American Bishop in a United Methodist 
Church. That is only a dream; but we can dream, and we never had 
that kind of dream before. 

And lastly, I want to say there, as I look over the whole world 
situation, you know, with China, Japan and Vietnam, it just isn't just 
a ping-pong matter, folks; it's crucial, and I really think that the re- 
newal of world living and relationship will be in that arena, and 
maybe the Asian-American Methodists can be a bridge, but above 
all, not only a bridge for world-wide relationships, but we can add 
to, taking a small part in an inclusive church. Thank you very much. 

Robert Pinezaddleby (Oklahoma Indian Missionary) : I've been 
told to keep it short here. It seemed like the Indian American always 
has been told to keep it short. But I'm very happy today. Bishop 
Nichols, members of the General Conference, to have this opportunity 
again to stand before this great assembly, and especially I'm very 
happy to see my constituents, two of our Indian Americans up here 
in the front row. Had it not been for the involvement, the motiva- 
tion that has been afforded to the Indian Americans, that we would 
begin to feel confident, would begin to feel that there is hope, there 
is something that we can do as Indian Americans and make our con- 
tribution in this world. I want to say that two years ago we were 
seated in this great assembly, with voice but without vote, and per- 
haps that was a great turning point. Through the help of the Com- 
mission on Religion and Race and its input to the church at large, 
we've begun to feel the confidence and we've begun to feel the uplift 
of being a part of these vital programs under the Christian life. 

I want to say this morning that it is a happy privilege on my part, 
an American Indian, to make my input through motivation and 



The United Methodist Church 315 

through involvement and whatever potential that I have, that I can 
relate to the church at large. 

I've spent a great number of years being involved in the church 
in the Christian life and perhaps all these years, more or less, begin 
to lead up to this one idea, this one place where we would begin to 
see things happening in the Indian community. I want to say that 
through the program and through the work of the church the Indian 
has begun to feel motivated, begun to feel the awareness of being 
involved and to be aware of his potential. 

These three things stand out in the Indian community. We want 
to be motivated to serve the present age. We want to be motivated to 
serve and to participate in any area of the work that is afforded us 
through the church at large. We want to be involved, just like I feel 
that I've been involved through the workings of the Commission on 
Religion and Race, and through the other areas of work that is 
presented us in the Indian community, that we may be involved in 
such a way that there will be freedom expressed. There will be the 
Indian's voice proclaimed and there will be the creation of the new 
awareness that the United Methodism as a whole needs to become 
more aware of the presence of the Indian community within its midst. 

The church must be sensitized to come to this particular place that 
some of the experience the Indian is encountering today will be under- 
stood in some of the things that we are trying to do, will be uplifted, 
wherever we go and whatever we do, as we make our input that we 
may be aware of our potential as a people. This morning I want to 
thank the church at large and, speaking as a member of the Com- 
mission on Religion and Race and member of the Indian community, 
that it has been a wonderful experience to be a part of this kind of 
a program. Thank you. 

Hector Navas (Florida): Bishop Nichols, fellow delegates: 
From the windy city of Chicago, from the tropical shores of Puerto 
Rico, from the ghettos of New York City and from the barrios of 
Los Angeles, from the sprawling area of Texas and from the sunny 
areas of Florida came marching the Hispanic community to the his- 
torical city of El Paso to celebrate the first Hispanic national con- 
vention in this past quadrennium. We came, naturally, expressing our 
cultural heritage, but even more, we came expressing our concern 
for a more vital ministry in the Hispanic community across the land. 
But yet, even more, we came expressing our faith in The United 
Methodist Church, to respond to the needs which are so evident in 
the Hispanic community. 

The church has responded through the Commission on Religion and 
Race. The Hispanic community has experienced and expanded its min- 
istries into areas hithertofore unvisited by even us. The Commission 
on Religion and Race has afforded us the opportunity to meet with 
the Council of Secretaries in order to have a continuing dialogue on 
the concerns of the Hispanic community. The Commission on Re- 
ligion and Race has afforded us the highest privilege of meeting 
with the highest Council of the church, that of the Council of Bish- 
ops here last week in this city in order for the first time for the 
ethnic caucuses and the Hispanic caucus to talk with our Bishops 
concerning the needs of Hispanics. And lastly, the Commission has 
provided us with this great privilege of coming before this great 
delegation to present our needs. The Commission on Religion and 
Race has opened the door. Such a door can never again be closed. 

Before you and this great delegation are many petitions. We the 
Hispanic community are supporting the concerns of the Rio Grande 
Conference for decent pensions, for adequate salaries. We are sup- 
porting LAMAG in Los Angeles for their needs for scholarships in 



316 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

retraining ministers and for compensatory education. We are sup- 
porting also Puerto Rico and their concern to become an autonomous 
church; the Hispanic community through MARCHA, which is the 
Methodists Associated Representing the Cause for Hispanic Ameri- 
cans, is now also moving on further to identify itself and to become 
an integral part; SEMAR in which all of Hispanics from the United 
States and of South America would come together to express its 
concern. My heart rejoices at the fact that we have received for this 
great body the letter from the Holy Father. We the Hispanics can 
appreciate that, for all of us have tremendous traditions within the 
Catholic community. We pray, however, that as we proceed to close 
the gap and cross the sea to relate to the Vatican that Methodism 
will cross the street to relate to the Hispanic community in the 
nation. 

Commission on Religion and Race Recommendations 

Joseph E. Loivery presented legislative recommendations 
as contained in the Commission's report; these recommenda- 
tions provide for the continued existence of the Commission 
as a general agency of the church. He stated that the 
Commission would recommend that this be referred to the 
Legislative Committee on Conferences. 

Mr. Loivery introduced Leonard D. Slutz (West Ohio) ; 
Mr. Slutz presented recommendations in the Commission 
report under the heading, "Elimination of Structure Based 
on Race." He reviewed the background of church structure 
based on race in the former Methodist Church and the pres- 
ent situation; the Commission recommendation was then 
presented. 

Mr. Slutz: Now it is 1972. We have in the General Conference 
again and again and again reaffirmed the principle of voluntarism. 
We have encouraged voluntary action, and we have been successful 
in eliminating most of the structure of our church that was related 
to race, but now we have come to 1972. We are convinced that the 
intention of 1966 should now become actuality. This is something 
that should be done. We believe it must be done now, without further 
delay. Consequently we are bringing to the General Conference a 
proposed amendment to paragraph 625 of the Discipline. 

That paragraph now reads: "The Jurisdictional Conference shall 
have powers and duties as described in the Constitution. It shall 
also have such other powers and duties as may be conferred by 
the General Conference . . .", and it now reads, '*. . . and in exercise 
thereof it shall act in all respects in harmony with the policy of The 
United Methodist Church with respect to elimination of discrimina- 
tion based on race." 

Now, we propose to add at that point the following: "In further- 
ance of that policy, the Jurisdictional Conference shall determine the 
boundaries of its Annual Conferences without regard to race. The 
mergers of Annual Conferences required by this provision shall be 
effective at the close of the 1972 session of the Jurisdictional Con- 
ference subject to the transitional provisions for readjustment of 
districts involved in the 1972 amendment to subparagraph 3 of para- 
graph 390 of the Discipline." 

We have studied this as carefully as we can. We are convinced 
that it is constitutional, as well as being ethical and Christian, but 



The United Methodist Church 317 

we do feel that as a precaution we should have a ruling of the 
Judicial Council at the earliest possible moment so that we are assured 
that this legislation will accomplish what it is intended to do and 
will result in the elimination of racial structure by 1972. Consequently 
as part of our final motion, we will be asking that this provision be 
referred to the Judicial Council now for a declaratory decision as to 
its constitutionality and validity, and then, we go on and we say 
that after we have merged the Annual Conferences there should be 
no districts based on race. 

We recognize that there may have to be some adjustments in some 
of the Conferences that are not yet merged, and so we do have a pro- 
vision that would allow the district mergers to be completed by the 
1973 session of the Annual Conference. We have a provision that is 
in your report for the representation of those coming from all merged 
Conferences on the boards and agencies of the successor Conference, 
and the language was taken verbatim from the provisions in connec- 
tion with EUB and Methodist mergers of Annual Conferences. 

Time Extended 

The Chair noted that the hour for adjournment had ar- 
rived ; Mr. Slutz moved that the time be extended to permit 
the completion of the report. The motion was adopted. Mr. 
Slutz stated that the Commission would recommend that 
this portion of the report be referred to the Legislative 
Committee on Conferences. 

Additional Recommendations 

Mr. Slutz presented the recommendations contained in 
the Commission report related to the Temporary General 
Aid Fund, with the Commission recommending referral 
to the Council on World Service and Finance. He then 
presented the recommendations contained in the report re- 
garding the representation of minorities in General and 
Jurisdictional Conferences, with the Commission recom- 
mending referral to the Committee on Conferences. 

William D. Cotton (Louisiana) asked a question regard- 
ing the referral of portions of the Commission report to the 
Judicial Council. Mr. Slutz stated that the Commission was 
recommending such a request for a declaratory decision 
because they felt it would be helpful to the legislative com- 
mittee to know that the legislation before them was con- 
stitutional. Mr. Cotton noted that the report called for the 
referral of the proposed change in Paragraph 625 only and 
asked that the proposed changes in Paragraphs 390 and 815 
be similarly referred. Mr. Slutz responded that the Com- 
mission had felt there could be no question about the con- 
stitutionality of the changes in the latter two paragraphs, 
but that they had no objection to their referral and would 
accept Mr. Cotton's suggestion. 

Matter of Privilege 

John C. Satterfield (Mississippi) requested the privilege 



318 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

of the floor for the purpose of correcting a statement in 
the report which he stated was in error. 

Mr. SatterHeld: Reference is made in the report and by the speaker 
and it is said that paragraph no. 10 shown on page 71 of the report was 
adopted by each jurisdiction by two-thirds vote. I am sure this was a 
wholly inadvertent error, because, as a matter of fact, under Calendar 
No. 51, the Southeastern Jurisdictional Conference by a vote of about 
9 to 1, amended that paragraph no. 10, to conform it to the words 
of enabling legislation, particularly the first sentence thereof, and 
that paragraph as adopted by the Southeastern Jurisdictional Con- 
ference, conforming to the enabling legislation, is as follows: 

"The adoption of this resolution by the Jurisdictional Conference 
shall constitute a pledge that it will assist in bringing about the 
merger of such Conferences as soon as practical and mutually agree- 
able to accomplish this concern." It did not adopt any reference to 
the year 1972 of the Jurisdictional Conference, and the wording 
which is thus utilized in the Southeastern Jurisdictional Conference 
is taken from step 2 of enabling legislation which appeared on 
pages 521 and 522 of the Discipline which refers to such merger, 
". . . bring about as soon as practicable and mutually agreeable, the 
merging of Conferences." I think that was an inadvertant mistake 
by the Committee. 

Mr. Slutz: Mr. Chairman, I believe there was no mistake. The 
language was carefully chosen. What I said was that there was a 
favorable vote of more than two-thirds across each Jurisdiction. That 
is true. The votes of the Annual Conferences of the Southeastern 
Jurisdiction, if you add them up — I did not say the Jurisdictional 
Conference; I said across the Southeastern Jurisdiction and every 
other Jurisdiction in Methodism. 

Mr. SatterReld: On the matter of privilege, may I correct the 
speaker that this was not presented to the Annual Conferences of 
the Southeastern Jurisdiction as applicable to any Conference, other 
than a particular Conference involved, and therefore the statement 
of the speaker, to my mind, is somewhat confusing. 

Bishop Nichols: Well, we will refer all of this to the legislative 
committee. Thank you, sir. 

Additional Recommendations 

Mr. Lowery presented the recommendation contained in 
the Commission report relative to the Minority Group Self- 
Determination Fund, with the Commission further recom- 
mending referral to the Legislative Committee on Christian 
Social Concerns, Peter F. Chen (Southern California-Ari- 
zona) sought to propose an amendment to this section of 
the report ; the Chair ruled that he was out of order. 

Mr. Lowery presented the remaining recommendations 
contained in the Commission report along with recommen- 
dations for the legislative committee to which each should 
be referred. The Commission requested that the recommen- 
dations entitled "Involuntary Location of a Ministerial 
Member" and "Ministerial Classification" be referred to 
the Committee on Clergy; that the one entitled "Local 
Church Inclusiveness" be referred to the Committee on the 



The United Methodist Church 319 

Local Church; that the one entitled ''Ethnic Episcopal 
Leadership" be referred to the Committee on Conferences ; 
and that the "Resolution on Use of United Methodist Prop- 
erty and Private Schools" be referred to the Legislative 
Committee on Lay Activities and Church Finance. On behalf 
of the Commission Mr. Loivery moved that the report be 
received, with the various sections being referred to legis- 
lative committees as recommended, and that the Judicial 
Council be requested to make a declaratory decision on the 
proposed legislation on merger of conferences. 

Point of Order 

William L. Sharp (North Mississippi) : I raise a point of order, 
Mr. Chairman, that under Rule 25, that after the discussion of a 
matter, the speaker cannot make a motion that would stop debate. As 
I understand this motion, the speaker is including within his motion 
that this report in various portions be referred to a specific commit- 
tee. This, I believe, constitutes or requires a suspension of the rules 
and would therefore be a non-debatable matter and this speaker is 
not entitled to make such a motion. 

The Chair ruled that Mr. Loivery could not make the 
motion inasmuch as he v^as not a member of the Confer- 
ence, but that the substance of the motion was in order, 
since a motion to refer is debatable. Mr. Sharp asked if he 
would be in order to make a motion. The Chair stated that 
it would first be necessary to have the Commission's motion 
properly before the Conference. Leonard D. Slutz (West 
Ohio) offered the motion of referral on behalf of the Com- 
mission. 

Franklin Blackstone (Western Pennsylvania) raised a 
point of order that a motion to refer to specified committees 
rather than to the Committee on Reference required a 
suspension of the rules. Mr. Slutz moved that the rules be 
suspended so that the Commission's recommendations could 
be referred to the legislative committees suggested in the 
referral motion. The Chair ruled that the motion did receive 
the requisite two-thirds majority, 

Peter F. Chen (Southern California- Arizona) moved as 
a substitute for the Commission report on the Minority 
Group Self-Determination Fund that the request be for 
$2,000,000 annually. Mr. Lowery stated that the Commis- 
sion would accept that both go to the legislative committee 
for consideration. 

The motion to refer was put to a vote and adopted. Mr. 
Lowery concluded the report. 

Mr. Lowery: This report, Mr. Chairman, has not, indeed cannot, 
adequately express the happening which was Commission on Religion 
and Race during the quadrennium past. Our work has been an ad- 
venture in faith and hope. We've tried to be the church speaking 



320 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

meaningful responses to the continuing crises in human history. In 
such a spirit we have sincerely respected our differences while lov- 
ingly affirming our oneness. 

We have been introduced on the Commission to the meaning of 
pluralism where we joyfully embrace our unity and purpose in faith 
while blessing our diversity in method and mode. We've not always 
acted in wisdom, but we've acted always in good faith. We could not 
please everyone, but we did not get bogged down in trying. We have 
tried to bring comfort to the disturbed, and in so doing we may have 
disturbed the comfortable. We have tried to discern God's will and 
hear his voice amidst the cries of the multitudes and at the crossing 
of the crowded ways. 

We urge that the small flames of hope ignited during the quad- 
rennium past will be fanned with our continued ministries. I wonder, 
Bishop, if we could close our report by singing one verse of this 
glorious anthem which comes up out of the groaning experience of 
the oppressed in America and becomes a doxology rolling from the 
lips of the down-trodden, yet whispering hope, singing faith and 
proclaiming a commitment to march on to victory. 

Announcements 

Announcements were made by the Secretary, J. Wesley 
Hole. 
Closing 

Harry L. Johnson (Southern New England) : Bishop, delegates, as 
we leave here each day each of us is confronted by the headlines 
in the newspapers and the words that they scream forth at us are 
words like Hanoi, Haiphong, Saigon, protective reaction, retaliatory 
bombing, massive invasion, provocation, escalation, devastation. Those 
are the words they scream, yet the words that I hear are not those, 
but these. "Thou shall not kill." And these, "For inasmuch as you 
have it to the least of these my brethren, you have done it unto me." 
And also these, "Thou shall love thy neighbor as thyself." And as 
we consider the ugliness, the evil of the war that surrounds us on 
all sides, each of us could probably point to the causes, to the situa- 
tions, and even to the persons who are responsible for getting us 
in this mess. We could, I'm sure, point to the monsters who are re- 
sponsible for this situation. 

Bishop Nichols: Now sir, v/e are not going to have time for a long 
speech, will you please . . .? 

Mr. Johnson: I didn't intend it as a speech, Bishop. I didn't mean 
to offend. At this point there is nothing that I would have us say, 
there is no resolution that I would have us pass, those words and 
that action will, I trust, come in the fullness of time. Rather, I 
would beg that we, each of us, make a statement with our bodies 
as we leave this hall. I would ask that we not simply stand up and 
go to lunch, because many of our brothers and sisters around the 
world will not be eating lunch today. They hurt and bleed and die 
out there, and I ask that we join them, I ask that on behalf of the 
total church, on behalf of caring people everywhere we protest the 
war that destroys them. I ask that we rise as a single body, a 
single spirit, and journey silently from this hall out into the bright 
sunlight of the world. 

I ask that we stand as one and march from the orderliness of this 
assembly, from the comforts of this hall, several thousand strong, 
and inject the prophetic witness of the people of God into this 
chaotic moment in history. And when we get outside I ask that we 
stand, each of us, before the unrelenting glare of God's bright sun 



The United Methodist Church 321 

for five long, silent, thoughtful, painful, prayerful, powerful minutes. 
That we might return to our business renewed in wisdom and in 
strength and in understanding of who we are and whence we come, 
and what we are about. 

The delegates left in silence. 



FIFTH DAY, THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1972 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening — Bishop D. Frederick Wertz 

Pursuant to adjournment, the General Conference of 
The United Methodist Church convened in the morning 
session of the fifth day, Thursday, April 20, 1972, at 8:30 
a.m. in the Civic Center, Atlanta, with Bishop D. Frederick 
Wertz, West Virginia Area, presiding. 

Devotions 

The Conference sang Hymn No. 30, "Praise to the Living 
God"; Matthew 5:21-24, 27-29, 43-48 were read from the 
New English Bible. Bishop Hermann W. Kaebnick, Harris- 
burg Area, spoke on the subject, "The Extraordinariness 
of the Christian Life" (see page 737). Hymn No. 479, 
"Lord, Whose Love Through Humble Service," was sung. 

Choral selections were sung by the choir of Columbia 
College, Columbia, South Carolina, Guthrie Darr, director. 

Committee on Journal 

George R. Akers (Wyoming) reported that the journal of 
April 19 had been examined and found to be in order. 

Committee on Agenda 

Alva H. Clark (Nebraska) presented three motions on 
behalf of the Committee on Agenda. He moved that the 
agenda as printed in the Daily Christian Advocate be 
approved except that at 11:05 a.m. the Program Council be 
allowed to present a portion of its report other than that 
printed as the Committee on Ministries, with Bishop 
W. Ralph Ward, Syracuse Area, guiding the presentation. 
The second motion was that the Conference establish plenary 
sessions both morning and afternoon on Saturday for the 
primary purpose of giving consideration to such calendar 
items as may be ready for action. The third motion was 
that the Conference request, effective Friday, April 21, 
that all groups arrange for necessary announcements to be 
printed in the Daily Christian Advocate and that the Secre- 
tary accept only announcements of an emergency nature for 
oral presentation. The report with the three motions was 
adopted. 

Committee on Credentials 

W. T. Handy, Jr. (Louisiana) reported that the Commit- 
tee had met and examined the changes made in the seating 

322 



The United Methodist Church 323 

of delegates as reported by delegation chairpersons, and 
that changes approved for the April 19 session would appear 
in proper form in the journal. He moved the adoption of 
the report, and it vi^as voted. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) reported that the 
presiding officer for the following morning's session would 
be Bishop Reuben H. Mueller, Indiana Area. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) introduced 
Bishop Francis E. Kearns, Ohio East Area, for the presenta- 
tion of the newly elected General Secretary of the Division 
of Curriculum Resources of the Board of Education. Bishop 
Kearns stated that the present General Secretary, Henry M. 
Bullock, would retire July 1, and that Eivart G. Watts 
(Kansas East) had been chosen as his successor. Bishop 
Kearns introduced Bishop Hermann W. Kaebnick, Harris- 
burg Area, who introduced Mr. Watts. 

Privilege Motion 

Mr. Watts expressed his appreciation and asked for the 
support, criticism, and prayers of the church. He moved that 
the Conference express its deep appreciation to Henry M. 
Bullock for twenty years of faithful service as editor of 
church school publications in The Methodist Church and 
The United Methodist Church. The motion was adopted. 

Presentation of British Delegation 

Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) introduced 
Bishop F. Gerald Ensley, Ohio West Area, for presentation 
of members of the British delegation to the General 
Conference. 

Bishop Ensley: Four years ago this General Conference initiated a 
constitutional amendment which would make it possible for four mem- 
bers of this General Conference of this Church to represent us as 
bona fide members of the British Conference, and they would recipro- 
cate. This has been passed; some of us were privileged to enjoy the 
hospitality, the warm hospitality of the British Conference, and now 
they are making their first visit to us as bona fide members of this 
Conference. 

I would like to present each of them personally, and two of them 
will say just a brief word. The head of their delegation is Dr. Eric 
Baker, who for well nigh twenty years has been the secretary of the 
British Conference. He is a man of distinction, a graduate of the 
University of Cambridge, one of the few individuals in the history of 
their Church who at the time that he was the secretary of the 
Conference was also elected as the president of the Conference. We 
are very happy to have him today. I do not know of anyone more 



324 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

representative of British Methodism at its best than Dr. Baker. 
Mr. President, I present him to the Conference. 

Eric W. Baker (Great Britain) : Mr. Chairman, Bishop Ensley, and 
fellow Methodists, some little time ago I found myself in a bus in this 
country where there was only one other occupant. We got to talking to 
one another, and he asked me what I did in England (I hadn't told 
him I was an Englishman; I don't know quite how he discovered it). 
But when I told him that in England I was a Methodist minister he 
expressed great surprise, and said, "I didn't think there were any 
Methodists in England." So I said, "Oh, yes, you know John Wesley 
was an Englishman." He said, "Oh, yes, I know all about him, but I 
thought all of that was finished long ago." 

Well, our presence here, the four of us, Mr. Chairman, is visible 
proof that there are still some of us left, and we four are very greatly 
honored and privileged to be the first delegates from our Conference 
to your General Conference under this new arrangement. After all, 
the whole of Methodism throughout the world stems either from us 
or from you, and of course originally you also stem from us. And it 
is very right and proper that in these days, in these testing times 
when Methodism I believe has a world function to discharge, that these 
two great fountainheads of Methodism should have this reciprocal 
relationship. I'm sure that it will be to the great benefit of the whole 
of Methodism everywhere. 

Now, of course, when we come to your conference we are conscious 
first of all of the deviations from our ways of doing things. There 
must be deviations when you think of your history as a frontier 
church, of the circuit rider following the settlers, or sometimes going 
in advance of the settlers from East to West of the developing new 
country — there are bound to be deviations. Some of the deviations are 
very impressive ones. Of course, the whole episcopal venture is a 
deviation as far as we are concerned. 

We have somehow rather managed to get along without them, and 
it means that at our Conference we haven't got the impressive, but 
silent, phalanx of bishops to gaze upon that you have. But this new 
arrangement is a wonderful thing for your bishops, because if they 
are nominated as they have so far to come to our conference it means 
that when an American bishop comes to the British Conference, he 
isn't for that time a bishop at all. He is just a presbyter, and he has 
all the freedom of a presbyter. He can speak, and he can vote, and 
they behave like schoolboys let loose. 

Well now, Mr. Chairman, I have spoken of the way in which we 
dealt with the deviations, but the longer we are here, the more we 
are here. What impresses us is not the deviations but the similarities. 
We do know that, deep down, you like we, are the spiritual descen- 
dants of John Wesley. We all rejoice in that. It is a great responsibil- 
ity — it is a great and high privilege. And it is good to know that in 
these coming days we are going to try and discharge these responsi- 
bilities together. We in British Methodism have received so many 
good things from our American friends, particularly since the end 
of World War II, and it's wonderful that now that isn't just unofficial 
and on a personal level, but it's an official attitude of your Conference. 

We should like to pay tribute to the fact that this new arrangement 
has come about as a result of the initiative of your General Conference 
in your session in 1964. We want you to know that those of us who 
are here are having a wonderful time; we are enjoying every minute 
of it, and we shall go back to our own Conference and try and com- 
municate to it something of the inspiration and something of the 
delight and joy of this historic occasion. Thank you very much, in- 
deed, Mr. Chairman, 



The United Methodist Church 325 

Bishop Ensley presented John W. Kellaway (Great 
Britain), vice-president of the British Conference. 

Mr. Kellaway (Great Britain) : Mr. Chairman, Bishop Ensley, fellow 
Methodists, I am sure that you will understand when I say that I am 
conscious of a very deep sense of privilege in this moment for a 
variety of reasons which I do not intend to enumerate. I am very 
pleased to endorse the greetings that Dr. Baker has brought from 
British Methodism, and I specifically bring to you this day in this 
great Conference of The United Methodist Church greetings of the 
British laity. We salute you with gratitude to God for your great 
history in its development over the years. We salute you in all those 
things that you have achieved. We will watch and we listen to with 
family interest all that you do now and all, indeed, that you will 
attempt in the future. And in all your endeavors and in all your enter- 
prises in your witness to the world you seek to serve and to which 
you seek to bring salvation, we ask in this moment God's richest 
blessing. 

It would be ungracious of me, Mr. Chairman, if at this moment 
I didn't make a personal allusion and just express simply my gratitude 
for all the care and affection and concern and hospitality that I have 
received on two visits to your country this year in the name of, and 
in the service of, Methodism. 

This Conference of course, is equally as interesting to me as a 
layman as it is to Dr. Baker. It has been very illuminating. I must say 
that I have found the quality of your reports and their presentation 
of the highest order. Some of your parliamentary procedures are a 
little strange to those which I know myself, but I hope by the end 
of the fortnight I will be thoroughly familiar with them; and I am 
looking forward to a very eager interest to the debates which I 
understand will start with great vigor during the course of the 
next few days. 

What has surprised me I suppose, and perhaps I am wrong in 
being surprised these days, is the amazing similarity of our problems 
and our mutual concerns in fulfilling our common call and our com- 
mitted charge. We, too, are reappraising structures; we, too, have got 
commissions on doctrine, on the ministries, and social concerns and 
the like — not forgetting finance, which is becoming an increasing prob- 
lem to the whole of the Christian Church these days, and we have been 
doing this probably like you in order that we may more efficiently and 
economically, in every sense of that word, to more effectively proclaim 
the gospel of Christ to a sick world — the gospel, my friends, which 
simply says that "God is Love" and that the world works best and 
that men and women are at their best when there is love and not 
hate, peace and not war, unselfishness and not greed, plenty and not 
poverty; and that these things are only possible insofar as all men 
subscribe to them. And in this moment, therefore, we and Britain 
bring you ourselves, with you— with our hands joined across the 
world in this high endeavor of going forth to a world which is sick 
and which is hungry, going forth, my friends, with the spirit of our 
Founder and the commands of our Lord. God bless you all. 

Bishop Ensley introduced the other two members of the 
delegation from Great Britain, Pauline Webb and Norman 
Woolridge. 

Prayer for E. Stanley Jones 

Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) reported that 
the Committee on Courtesies and Privileges was recommend- 



326 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

ing that privilege be given Cecil T. Richards (North India) 
for the purpose of offering a greeting to E. Stanley Jones, 
who was ill, and a prayer on his behalf. 

Mr. Richards: Honorable Bishops and respected members of the 
General Conference, Dr. E. Stanley Jones, a former missionary in 
India who has served us for many, many years, an internationally 
known evangelist, a distinguished statesman, author of many books 
and founder of our Christian Ashrams in seven countries, is sick, and 
I want to make this motion: 

"The General Conference of the United Methodist Church in session 
April 20 in Atlanta sends its affectionate greetings to Dr. E. Stanley 
Jones and thanks God for his service to the church as missionary, 
evangelist, author, world traveler, founder of Christian Ashrams 
movement. We also pray for his sickness and ask God Almighty 
for his fast recovery." 

Shall we now bow our heads for prayer. Our most gracious and 
heavenly Father, Creator of all visible and invisible things. Giver 
of all good things, we thank thee for all thy manifold blessings. We 
are thankful for the life of our great missionary who brought the 
message of eternal life through Jesus Christ. We especially pray for 
our beloved missionary, Dr. E. Stanley Jones, who is sick. We ask 
Thy mercy and pray Thee for his recovery. In the name of our 
Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen. 

Personal Privilege 

The Chain recognized Don W. Holier (Kansas East) for 
a matter of privilege. Mr. Holier introduced Louise Watts, 
wife of Ewart G. Waiis, to the Conference. 

Committee on Reference 

Jerry G. Bray (Virginia), chairman of the Committee 
on Reference, explained the process followed by the Com- 
mittee in assigning petitions and study commission reports 
to the legislative committees under the Plan of Organization. 
He stated that after the Committee had met and made 
the initial assignment of sections of the Structure Study 
Commission report, requests had come from chairpersons 
of legislative committees who felt that they should have 
opportunity to consider portions of the report which had 
been assigned to other committees. Therefore the Committee 
on Reference had met again and agreed to make multiple 
referrals of certain items. Mr. Bray stated that all matters 
of structure had now been referred,, and if any committee 
felt that they had not received material which should have 
been assigned to them, they should consult with the Petitions 
Secretary, Newell P. Knudson. 

Council on World Service and Finance (see page 2025) 

Bishop Paul Hardin, Jr. (Columbia Area), president of 
the Council on World Service and Finance, expressed grati- 
tude for the support given the World Service Fund during 



The United Methodist Church 327 

the quadrennium and reviewed briefly the record of World 
Service receipts in the previous tvi^o years. He stated that 
the Council had worked to reduce overhead in order to free 
as much money as possible for mission. He referred the 
delegates to the Workbook prepared by the Council and 
containing its reports. Appreciation was expressed to the 
agencies and to the Program Council for their participation 
and cooperation in the development of the proposed budgets. 
Bishop Hardin introduced R. Bryan Brawner, General 
Treasurer, and the members of the Council who would be 
presenting various sections of the report : James A. Crippen 
(Detroit), Robert W. Preusch (New York), Foye G. Gibson 
(Holston) and Paul Webb, Jr. (North Georgia). It was 
announced that in order to be able to comply with Section 
VII of the Plan of Organization, the Council was asking all 
legislative committees and delegates who had proposals that 
would affect the budget to present those matters by Tuesday, 
April 25. 

Summary of Financial Recommendations for 1973-1976 and 
Description of General Funds 

James A. Crippen (Detroit) called the Conference's 
attention to the Workbook for Delegates which had been 
prepared by the Council on World Service and Finance and 
printed as No. 1-A of the Daily Christian Advocate. He 
presented Section I of the Workbook, entitled "Summary 
of Financial Recommendations for 1973-1976 and Descrip- 
tion of General Funds" ; this was described as an eflfort to 
give delegates a broad overview of the finances of the 
church. He noted specifically sections of the Workbook 
which provided brief descriptions of the general funds; a 
graphic presentation of how the dollar spent by the local 
church is divided ; and a summary sheet showing total appor- 
tionments and goals being recommended by the Council 
for nine basic general church funds and offerings. 

Mr. Crippen explained that it was not the intention of 
the Council to ask for Conference action on any items at 
this session; the purpose of this presentation was only to 
introduce the report to the Conference. He next called atten- 
tion to those pages in the report which detailed the appor- 
tionments to each conference as they would be if the Council 
report were approved in the form in which it was being 
presented. The process by which agency budget requests 
had been received and heard by the Council on World Service 
and Finance and by representatives of the Program Council 
was summarized. 

Mr. Crippen then noted where in the report the detailed 
budget recommendations for each general fund could be 



328 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

found. He also drew attention to sections of the report 
showing the receipts for each of the funds for each year 
of the quadrennium. Finally a portion of the report giving 
basic statistical information for the church was presented. 
Mr. Crippen introduced Robert W. Preusch (New York) 
for the presentation of specific recommendations for the 
World Service Fund. 

World Service Fund 

Mr. Preusch first outlined the factors considered by 
the Council on World Service and Finance in arriving at 
recommendations. 

Mr. Preusch: As we go into this budget, what we had to do is take 
a hard look at the trend of the church and what kind of money 
might we look to as a goal. So, we took a look at how much money 
was asked for and what we were collecting and what was being 
paid at the local level. In other words, we looked at the trend, and 
we came to the conclusion that the trend seemed to be one of a much 
greater desire to give at the local level and a greater desire to give 
where the gift seemed to be traced directly to the purpose for which 
it was given — in other words, an association. 

As we move in this World Service budget you will notice that some 
of the items have been moved out of World Service budget because 
they appear elsewhere as special apportionments. We also considered 
that there has been a two percent gain in total giving of all Methodists 
to the church's causes of all sorts, including the local church. There's 
been a 1 1/4 %> loss rate in total membership over the last several years. 
There's been a five percent gain in the area of church buildings, 
spending for capital purposes and debt reduction, and there has in this 
last year been a five percent decline in giving in World Service. So that 
we received, as you noted from these figures you were asked to look 
at, that the total World Service Fund which in 1970 was $22,412,127 
declined in 1971 to $21,450,642. So, we decided that what we had to do 
is realistically try to hold the level on World Service on apportion- 
ment, and we had that in our mind as we moved forward. We also 
felt that we owed it to the church to make an in-depth study into 
reserve funds, cash funds that might be held by agencies that weren't 
being currently applied and, also, that we had to give special con- 
sideration, however, to the changing needs so that we didn't just 
move by percent up or down across the board but be sensitive to the 
changing needs. 

In the process of reviewing the askings we actually devised uniform 
balance sheets, statement of changes in funds. We reviewed executive 
salaries on a uniform report. We set up a uniform system of reporting 
program centers. We set up uniform procedures for recording income 
and expenditures. And, then with that, we reviewed areas that we 
felt indicated duplications of one agency with another and duplication 
of administrative areas and, in some cases, we recommended absorp- 
tion of some functions of one agency by another. So that as this comes 
back, our recommendations have taken those things in account. 

Mr. Preusch explained the recommended allocations to 
the various agencies from the World Service Fund, noting 
the fact that for the first time agency requests and recom- 
mended allocations were being presented on an annual basis 



The United Methodist Church 329 

for each year of the quadrennium, instead of the previous 
practice of recommending one budget which would remain 
in effect all four years of the quadrennium. 

In reviewing the list of recommended World Service 
allocations, Mr. Preusch noted special circumstances affect- 
ing several of the recommendations. He stated that the 
Council on World Service and Finance commended the 
work of the American Bible Society as being exemplary of 
the work of a World Service agency, but that the Council 
also felt that the agency was financially strong and had 
the fund-raising capability to raise the needed funds on 
their own. Regarding the recommended declining allocation 
for Ministerial Education, Mr. Preusch explained that this 
cause was receiving increased support from the Ministerial 
Education Fund, and that part of the understanding of the 
General Conference in creating that Fund was that this 
item would eventually be phased out of the World Sevice 
Fund. 

Regarding the Commission on Religion and Race Mr. 
Preusch pointed out that in addition to the amount recom- 
mended in the World Service Fund, there was also a request 
for $1,000,000 for the Minority Group Self-Determination 
program, and that this amount was being recommended in 
another fund. In connection with Scarritt College, Mr. 
Preusch noted that there was a provision that a portion of 
the allocation could be contingent on the College raising 
matching funds. He announced that a special study of Scar- 
ritt College was to begin. 

Illness of Bishop Kennedy 

The Chair stated that the hour for recess had arrived. 
He recognized Bishop Marvin Stuart, Denver Area, on a 
matter of privilege. Bishop Stuart announced that Bishop 
and Mrs. Gerald Kennedy, Los Angeles Area, had returned 
to Southern California because of Bishop Kennedy's illness, 
and that he was in the United Methodist Hospital in Arcadia. 
He asked that the Conference send an expression of love and 
the assurance of its prayers to Bishop and Mrs. Kennedy. 
Melvin G. Talbert (Southern California- Arizona) moved 
that this be done, and the motion was adopted. Bishop 
Stuart offered a prayer. 

Bishop Marvin Stuart: As I oflFer this prayer, let me share with you 
the outline of a sermon I heard Bishop Kennedy give in First United 
Methodist Church a week ago Sunday on the text While It Was Yet 
Dark. He said, "Faith is courage, faith is light, faith is victory." Let 
us pray. 

We pray, O God, our Father, that thou wilt strengthen the courage 
of Bishop and Mrs. Kennedy, that the light of thy love will burn 
brightly vdthin them, and may Bishop Kennedy achieve the victory 



330 Journal of the 1972 Genei'ol Confer^ence 

over this affliction, that the voice of that great preacher of the Word 
may not be stilled. We pray for those doctors and nurses. Give them 
the wisdom which they need. They are instruments of thine for his 
healing. But, above all, we place him in the hands of the Great 
Physician. The healing of his seamless dress is by our beds of pain. 
We touch him in life's throng and press, and we are made whole 
again. Amen. 

Following the prayer the Conference was in recess. After 
the recess the Conference was led by Carlton R. Young 
(East Ohio) in the singing of the hymn, "Amazing Grace." 

Committee on World Methodist Night 

The chair recognized Paul A. Dtiffey (Alabama- West 
Florida) for the presentation of persons responsible for the 
World Methodist Night program the previous evening. Mr. 
Duffey expressed appreciation to the World Methodist 
Council for providing the flags used in the service. He 
introduced John Clayton as the executive producer and 
writer of the program Out on the Edge of Time and David 
Abernathy as its producer. 

Council on World Service and Finance 

Robert W. Preusch (New York), continuing with the 
report of the Council on World Service and Finance, called 
attention to Report No. 2 dealing with the apportionment 
formula for the World Service Fund. This recommended 
apportionment involved a change from the previous formula 
and would be based on two factors, church membership and 
total expenditures minus payment on indebtedness, buildings 
and improvements. He noted that apportionments calculated 
on the recommended formula were printed in the Council's 
report to enable delegates to compare for themselves the 
effect of the proposed change on their annual conference's 
apportionment. 

Episcopal Fund 

Foye G. Gibson (Holston) presented Council on World 
Service and Finance Report No. 3, deahng with the Episco- 
pal Fund. Mr, Gibson drew attention to the recommendations 
for episcopal salaries and then explained recommended 
changes in the episcopal pension plan. 

Mr. Gibson: Then, in the matter of pensions, traditionally the 
pensions have been recommended on the basis of 25% of the salary 
of an active bishop plus a housing allowance, and this is continued 
for all present bishops, both retired and active, those who retire this 
year. Then there is a change suggested for_ bishops elected this year 
and hereafter. Frankly, heretofore, a pastor in a conference who 
had served as a conference claimant, either in the parish or the district 
superintendency, he was discriminated against because he lost his 
annual conference pension. If perchance the minister had served in 



The United Methodist Church 331 

some funded, vested program, as many of the men are now doing^, 
they retained that portion of the pension that they had already 
earned. And so this Section B is an endeavor to do two things: 
first, to set a higher pension for the man who has served in the 
episcopacy longer, and then, to grant to those ministers who were 
conference claimants the pension that they would have earned as a 
conference claimant. However, this pension would be paid in its 
entirety from the Episcopal Fund. 

After presenting the recommendations contained in the 
report for housing allowances, office expenses, and travel 
expenses, Mr. Gibson noted that the report contained the 
recommendation that the apportionment for the Episcopal 
Fund for the first year of the new quadrennium be reduced 
from 2% to 1%% of pastors' cash salaries. 

General Administration Fund 

Robert W. Preusch (New York) presented Council on 
World Service and Finance Report No. 4, dealing with the 
General Administration Fund. He explained changes being 
recommended as to which agencies should be included in 
this fund budget. Among these changes were the transfer 
of the Board of Pensions allocation from the World Service 
Fund to General Administration ; the transfer of the Com- 
mission on Ecumenical Affairs from General Administration 
to the Interdenominational Cooperation Fund; and the 
transfer of the Commission on Worship from General 
Administration to World Service. 

Mr. Preusch commented on some of the specific recom- 
mendations. He explained that the World Methodist Council 
had substantially increased responsibilities, including some 
previously assigned to COSMOS. United Methodist Informa- 
tion had experienced heavier costs connected with coverage 
of General and Jurisdictional Conferences. The Council 
had judged that the Methodist Corporation held reserves 
adequate to meet its needs. 

Interdenominational Cooperation Fund 

Mr. Preusch continued by presenting Council on World 
Service and Finance Report No. 5, dealing with the Inter- 
denominational Cooperation Fund. He noted a new feature 
in the recommendations relating to this fund. 

Mr. Preusch: We came up with a recommendation of the Commission 
on Ecumenical Affairs coming in as a prior claim into this budget 
for $150,000 and charging that body with the responsibility of 
coordinating the work between the other participating agencies in 
this fund and The United Methodist Church, and the recommendations, 
I think, that are before you are clear. 

This budget equals $1,000,000; we've not collected it nearly as 
well as administrative apportionments or World Service on apportion- 
ments, and it is reasonable to assume that some reserves will come 



332 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

out of that $1,000,000 if we are realistic on payments and they 
follow the past pattern. In other words, we've only been collecting 
about 1%'^/r, 77 9f) of the apportionments on this item, so that over 20% 
of the $1,000,000 will probably be lost, unless we go at raising the full 
amount apportioned of the $1,000,000. 

Temporary General Aid Fund 

Paul Webb, Jr. (North Georgia) presented Council on 
World Service and Finance Report No. 7, dealing with the 
Temporary General Aid Fund. He summarized the historical 
background of the fund and the purpose for which it had 
been created. Changes which had been made in the fund 
apportionment by the 1968 and 1970 General Conferences 
were explained. The specific recommendations for 1973- 
1976 as contained in the report were then presented. 

Ministerial Education Fund 

Mr. Webb continued with the presentation of Council 
on World Service and Finance Report No. 6, dealing with 
the Ministerial Education Fund. He reviewed the back- 
ground of the fund, as it had originated on a jurisdictional 
basis in the Southeastern Jurisdiction, and then as it had 
been approved as a general church fund by the 1968 General 
Conference. He summarized the growth in receipts of the 
fund beginning with 1970, the first year in which it had 
been apportioned on a national basis, and the recommenda- 
tions for the 1973-1976 quadrennium as contained in the 
report. 

Black College Fund 

Mr. Webb continued with the presentation of the Council 
on World Service and Finance Report No. 8, dealing with 
the Black College Fund. In addition to the report, Mr. Webb 
referred the Conference to a position paper prepared by the 
presidents of the twelve black colleges entitled Twelve 
Negro Colleges and the report of the Commission on the 
Black Colleges entitled Black Colleges: The Call to Renew 
a Coimnitment. He stated that the Council was recommend- 
ing that the full amount requested be raised by an apportion- 
ment on the same formula as the World Service Fund. 

Other Recommendations 

James A. Crippen (Detroit) called attention to recom- 
mendations contained in Report No. 9, Special Days, partic- 
ularly to that portion of the report recommending that 
there be a Human Relations Day observed as a special day 
with offering. He also stated that Rural Life Sunday had 
been inadvertently omitted from the section of the report 



The United Methodist Church 333 

entitled "Special Days Not Involved In Offerings." Mr. 
Crippen concluded the report by referring delegates to 
Section III of the report, which consisted of legislative rec- 
ommendations. 

Mr. Crippen announced that no action was being asked 
on the report at this session, and that when it was presented 
for action at a later session, the Conference would have 
opportunity to offer amendments and perfect the report 
as it wished. 

Human Relations Day Referral 

Raoid C. Calkins (West Ohio) moved that the proposal 
for a Human Relations Day offering contained in the report 
of the Council on World Service and Finance be referred 
to the Legislative Committee on Christian Social Concerns. 
The Chair called for the vote and ruled that the motion 
to refer prevailed. Carroll H. Long (Holston) raised a point 
of order that to refer to any specific committee other than 
the Committee on Reference required a suspension of the 
rules. The Chair stated that the point of order was well 
taken. The Chair asked for a vote on the suspension of the 
rules and ruled that it did not receive the required two- 
thirds vote. The item was therefore not referred. 

The Bishops' Call for Peace and the Self -Development of 
Peoples 

Bishop A. James Armstrong, Dakota Area, presented on 
behalf of the Council of Bishops The Bishops' Call for Peace 
and the Self-Development of Peoples (see page 1667). 

Bishop Armstrong: Mr. Chairman, delegates, friends, a little less 
than two years ago, the Executive Committee of the Council of 
Bishops asked that a committee be formed to bring to this General 
Conference and to The United Methodist Church, an emphasis upon 
peace growing out of the felt and expressed needs of our people and 
out of the urgent demands of our time. A task force on peace was 
appointed drawn from the Council of Bishops; its members are before 
you — Bishop John Wesley Lord, Bishop Roy Nichols, Bishop Earl 
Hunt, Bishop McFerrin Stowe, Bishop Maynard Sparks, Bishop 
Ernst Sommer from overseas and myself. We have met together; 
we have met with persons representing the boards and agencies of 
our Church, have entered into extensive communication, correspond- 
ence, dialogue vdth ecumenical figures, with figures in public life, with 
academicians, each with expertise in this field. 

In our recent meeting as a Council in Des Moines we approved the 
statement that is now in your hands, and, therefore, it is placed be- 
fore you. We are mindful, I am certain, of the headlines that are 
screaming across the newspapers that confront us each time we leave 
this auditorium. We talk here about finance and structure, about the 
essential ingredients of institutional life. There is no way to neglect 
these items. But even as we discuss them, we feel guilty because we 
are not addressing those issues that are determining the destiny of 
earthbound people beyond these walls, persons who even now are being 



334 Journal of the 1972 Geyieral Conference 

victimized and brutalized by a re-escalated war in Southeast Asia 
and by other hostilities, other violence in other corners of this earth. 

The statement that comes to you now is a general statement. It 
does not specifically isolate any particular war, any single cause of 
war, any single source of peace, but attempts, rather, to place before 
all of us an approach to peace based in the Christ, based in the 
faith that He is nonetheless aware of the dynamics that are at 
work in our sort of world. In a moment, Bishop Roy Nichols will 
present to you recommendations growing out of this Call that will be 
offered for your possible response and action. But, first, in a moment 
let me read particular sections of the Call itself, before doing that. 

About five years ago Simon and Garfunkel had a song that was 
making the rounds, sung in many of our churches, that moved all 
of us. It was called, The Sounds of Silence. The most eloquent sound 
of silence I have heard in my lifetime reverberated through this hall 
yesterday as at the end of the morning session we moved out for 
our quiet vigil, mindful of, many shamed, because of what is happen- 
ing even now in Vietnam. That silence, your silence, helped set the 
stage for these words. 

The basic beliefs of the former Evangelical United Brethren 
Church stated forthrightly that war and bloodshed are not compatible 
with the Gospel and the Spirit of Christ. The Methodist Social Creed 
said, "We must actively and constantly create the conditions of 
peace." World peace, a requisite for human survival, is a fundamental 
objective of Christians everjrwhere. 

In a recent survey (and this of course has come to your attention 
through Virgil Sexton's incisive book Listening to the Church) 
United Methodists expressed their profound concern about the cheap- 
ness with which human life is treated and the possibility of the total 
extinction of the race. They revealed an overriding concern about 
world peace and the morality of war. In response to this concern, 
in the light of traditional denominational teachings, and on the basis 
of a biblical faith, the Council of Bishops of The United Methodist 
Church issues this Call for Peace and the Self -development of Peoples. 

Peace is not simply the absence of war, a nuclear stalemate, or a 
combination of uneasy cease-fires. It is that emerging dynamic reality 
envisioned by prophets where spears and swords give way to the 
implements of peace, where historic antagonists dwell together in 
trust, and where righteousness and justice prevail. There will be no 
peace with justice until unselfish and informed love are structured 
into political processes and international arrangements. 

The enemies of peace are many. War results from a complex of 
personal, social, economic and political forces. If war is to be over- 
come, its root causes must be isolated and dealt with. What are the 
enemies of peace? (1) Blind self-interest is an enemy of peace. (2) 
Economic exploitation is an enemy of peace. (3) Racism. Racism is an 
enemy of peace. (4) Population explosion is an enemy of peace. (5) 
Nation worship is an enemy of peace. (6) Continued reliance upon 
military violence is an enemy of peace. (7) The arms race is an 
enemy of peace. 

Dehumanization, a special threat in a materialistic, technocratic 
society, is implicit in almost all the "enemies of peace" we have out- 
lined. The gospel of Jesus Christ proclaims the inestimable worth of 
each individual. It is "personal" in the most radical sense of the word. 
It seeks to humanize and would make common cause with those values 
and forces that are working for the fulfillment of the human potential 
in today's world. 

Peace is the gift of God, a gift that comes when man meets the 
conditions of God. The God who gives us peace is the Father of all 
men and the judge of all nations. He has revealed His perfect will 



The United Methodist Church 335 

through Jesus Christ, the Lord of history, the Prince of Peace. God's 
Holy Spirit, the cleansing and unifying presence in our midst, is 
able to work through current conflict and disruption that the divine 
will might be done on earth. 

And what are God's conditions for peace? They are many. They 
are personal and cultural; theological and practical; attitudinal and 
systemic. God calls us to penitence and new life. In the light of 
present crisis we are called upon to be "heartily sorry for these our 
misdoings." We have been vain and self-serving, indifferent to 
poverty and hunger, insensitive in the face of exploitation and 
suffering; we have enthroned the values of a materialistic society; 
we have reflected racist attitudes and participated in racists' systems ; 
we have worshipped our native land, had undue faith in military 
violence, permitted concepts of "national honor" to take precedence 
over the well-being of brutalized persons in distant places. 

Each of us, in the light of misguided loyalties and present apathy, 
is called upon to pray earnestly the familiar prayer, "0 God, be 
merciful to me a sinner," Genuine repentance can lead to a new life. 

One of the central injunctions of a biblical faith is, "Repent and 
believe. . . ." "When anyone is united to Christ there is a new world; 
the old order has gone and a new order has already begun." New life 
based upon honest awareness of past failures and sins is a requisite 
for peace within and world peace. Old values and allegiances are 
replaced by a new ethic in "the new being." 

If God's conditions for peace include penitence and new life, they 
can also be summarized with one word: love. Mature love is neither 
sensuality nor sentimentality. It is not a refuge for the naive. It is 
an unswerving and uncompromising way of life. It goes a second 
mile, turns the other cheek, accepts and offers itself for friend and 
enemy alike. It feeds the hungry, clothes the naked, seeks out the 
rejected and liberates the oppressed. Freedom is love's expression. 
Justice is love's demand. Believing that those who live by the sword 
will perish by the sword, and that those who find their security in 
nuclear stockpiles may well be destroyed by that weaponry, love seeks 
to overcome evil with good. 

"God was in Christ reconciling the world to himself . . . and . . , 
he has entrusted us with the message of reconciliation." (2 Cor. 5:19) 
Even as God is the source of our peace He has called us to be his 
servants; custodians of his message; "peacemakers." 

We have mentioned "the enemies of peace." Each of these enemies 
needs to be dealt with specifically. If war results from greed, 
ambition and sinful self-interest, peace requires the literal conversion 
of persons, of attitudes and values. It also requires a radical redefini- 
tion of institutional goals and priorities. Self-interest must be seen in 
relationship to love for God and brother man (Luke 10:25-28). If 
extremes of poverty and hunger are to be overcome, development 
programs must be based upon principles of global need and account- 
ability. They should not be designed to reinforce particular economic 
systems or protect the markets of privileged nations. 

Development, however, involves more than economic improvement. 
It refers to self-reliance and self-determination. The self-development 
of people requires equality of opportunity, full participation in 
decision-making processes, and a diffusion of political power from the 
few to the many. There will be no peace with justice unless liberation 
is gained by those who have been manipulated and victimized by 
interests that have been willing to profit from the continued depriva- 
tion of the weak and the powerless. 

But, the oppressor needs to be liberated as truly as the oppressed. 
Liberation affects the whole man. It is salvation; it is humanization. 
It is social, economic, political and spiritual. It calls for the structural 



336 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

implementation of those values announced by our Lord when he said 
he had come that the "broken victims" of life might "go free" 
(Luke 4:18). 

Racism must give way to justice if peace is to become a reality. 
This justice, based upon new attitudes, understanding and relation- 
ships, will be reflected in the laws, policies, structures and practices 
of both church and state. If dignity and self-determination are human 
rights, then respect for and the preservation of particular ethnic, 
cultural and racial traditions and values should be encouraged and 
assured. 

It is not the function of Christian witness to "Westernize," 
"Easternize," "Americanize" or in other ways acculturate human 
attitudes and responses. It is the function of the Christian to bring 
the full dimensions of the gospel of love and justice to bear upon the 
human situation. Concerned and adequate -population control programs 
must be developed if the planet is not to be crowded beyond its 
capacity to support human life. 

If peace is to come, nation-worship must be supplanted by the 
loyalty implicit in the declaration, "God so loved the tvorld . . . ." 
The individual is normally a patriot. He loves the soil of his native 
land and the heritage that has shaped his days. Grateful for home 
and heritage he is now called to a higher patriotism. 

Once men were forced to organize as tribes for self -protection, then 
tribes as city-states and city-states as nation-states. Today we 
are called to look beyond the limited and competing boundaries of 
nation-states to the larger and more inclusive community of man. 

This movement from narrow nationalism to global loyalties requires 
both international law and interyiational orgayiization. The develop- 
ment of international law has included a variety of landmark treaties. 
If peace with justice is to come, nation-states should utilize the 
United Nations and the International Court of Justice, as well as 
international trade, relief and scientific institutions, while seeking to 
perfect the instruments of international organization. If peace is to 
come, our present reliance upon military institutions and domination 
by a military-industrial complex must be replaced by civilian control 
of the military. 

An ordered society must be policed by forces responsible to that 
same society. Self-serving national military forces must eventually 
give way to duly constituted international peace-keeping units. The 
tradition of von-violent love is a fundamental dimension of the Chris- 
tian faith. Christians are challenged to consider and embrace this 
personal stance, thus providing a redemptive witness in society. 

There must be eventual disarmament. We cannot be certain of the 
causes of a particular war. "Causes" may be simply pretexts. In the 
final analysis, it is the presence of military institutions in the nations 
of the world that makes wars possible and arms races probable. The 
tide must be turned. 

Recognizing the strategic dangers of unilateral disarmament, 
nations can begin processes of military disengagement and move 
toward bilateral and multilateral disarmament agreements within the 
framework of the United Nations. Our suicidal confidence in arms 
and military systems must give way to a radical reordering of 
priorities and an awareness of overriding human values. 

The ingredients of peace are indivisible. Its realization cannot be 
achieved apart from theological, ethical and practical "sources." The 
individual must assume his full responsibility for "peacemaking." The 
Church must be far more faithful to its Lord, the Prince of Peace, 
than it has been willing to be in the past. And nations must become 
more deeply involved in the continuing processes of the self-develop- 
ment of people and the creation of a just and peaceful world order. 



The United Methodist Church 337 

Unless the most powerful and responsible members of the human 
family are willing to deal with the root causes of war, running the 
essential risks and making the necessary sacrifices, man will destroy 
himself. "(Christ Jesus) is himself our peace ... In his own body 
flesh and blood has broken down the enmity which stood like a 
dividing wall . . . For he (came) to create ... a single new humanity 
in himself, thereby making peace." (Ephesians 2:13-16 NEB) 

Recommendations — Bishop Roy C. Nichols 

Bishop Roy C. Nichols, Pittsburgh Area, presented rec- 
ommendations based on the Bishops' Call (see page 1673) . 

Harold A. Bosley (New York) : I move that this General Conference 
endorse the Bishops' Call for Peace and the Self-Development of 
Peoples and that we support the recommendation for the implementa- 
tion of this cause. If there is a second to this, I would like to speak 
to it for just a moment. 

Mr. Bosley spoke on behalf of his motion. Marshall C. 
Hjelte (Pacific Northwest) asked whether the report would 
be referred to a committee. The Chair stated that if the 
motion to endorse were adopted, it would not be referred. 
Mr. Hjelte moved to amend recommendation #7 to add a 
representative from the Board of the Laity; he spoke on 
behalf of the amendment. Bishop Armstrong accepted the 
amendment on behalf of the committee. Merlyn W. North- 
felt (Northern Illinois) suggested that one seminary pro- 
fessor and one seminary student be added to the commit- 
tee. Bishop Armstrong accepted the suggestion. 

Paul J. Meuschke (Western Pennsylvania) : I would like to amend 
paragraph 6 of the recommendations to include after the words in 
the first sentence ". . . the General Church ..." a comma and then 
these words ". . . the Annual Conferences and the local churches . . ." 
and if there is a second I will make a brief comment. 

Mr. Meuschke spoke on behalf of the amendment. Bishop 
Armstrong accepted it on behalf of the committee. Scott 
Jones (Youth Delegation) moved to amend paragraph 7 
of the recommendations to include one representative of the 
United Methodist Council on Youth Ministry. Bishop Arm- 
strong accepted the amendment. Dean A. Banning (Northern 
New Jersey) asked a question as to the approximate 
amount of money envisaged in recommendation 8, which 
requested an "adequate budget" for the proposed Coordi- 
nating Committee. Bishop Armstrong replied that $50,000 
had been requested and that the money was intended main- 
ly to provide for the cost of one meeting per year of the 
Committee and for the cost of seminars, training sessions 
and conferences ; none would be used for staff. 

Victor C. Vinhian (Northwest Philippines) spoke on 
behalf of the main motion. Jack M. Tuell (Pacific North- 
west) moved that the proposal be referred to the Council 



338 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

on World Service and Finance as required by Section VII 
of The Plan of Organization. The Chair indicated that this 
would be done under the regular rules of the Conference 
and did not require specific action. 

Kenneth Cooper (Alabama-West Florida) asked if the 
committee would accept an amendment to recommendation 
7 to include one woman on the Committee. Bishop Armstrong 
replied that this presented no problem. 

Point of Order 

James W. Bristah (Detroit) asked the Chair to rule 
whether the discussion and motion on this matter was in 
order in view of a report of the Committee on Reference 
printed in the Daily Christian Advocate indicating that this 
matter had been referred to the Legislative Committee on 
Christian Social Concerns. Bishop Armstrong replied that 
the item which had been referred was the bishops' state- 
ment on the intensification of the war in Vietnam and was 
misnamed in the report printed in the Daily Christian 
Advocate. The Chair asked for clarification as to whether 
the Bishops' Call had already been referred. Robert T. 
Young (Western North Carolina) asked whether it was in 
order for the Committee on Reference to refer a petition 
or report before it was received by the Conference. The 
Chair stated that it was in order. 

Robert W. Moon (California-Nevada) stated that the 
Legislative Committee on Christian Social Concerns was 
ready to report on the item mentioned in the Daily Christian 
Advocate, but that the item did deal with a different issue. 

Everett Jones (Baltimore), secretary of the legislative 
committee, stated that the committee report on the item 
had been printed in the Daily Christian Advocate and 
moved that that report be considered by the Conference. 
Tho7nas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) raised a point of order 
that the item had not been printed and before the Con- 
ference for the required amount of time; he stated also 
that the calendar item mentioned by Mr. Jones was not re- 
lated to the Bishops' Call. Mr, Jones moved that the rules 
be suspended so that Christian Social Concerns Committee 
Report No. 1 concerning the Bishops' Call for Peace could 
be considered immediately. 

John H. Rixse, Jr. (Virginia) stated that the Committee 
Report No. 1 and the petition reported by the Committee 
on Reference as referred to the legislative committee did 
not carry the same petition number. Mr. Jones assured the 
Conference that this was an error and that they were 
identical. 



The United Methodist Church 339 

Bishop Armstrong again stated that, despite the similar 
title, Committee Report No. 1 and the Bishops' Call he had 
presented to the Conference were not the same and should 
not be confused. 

Leo L. Baker (North Texas) asked for clarification 
regarding the meaning of recommendation 6. 

Mr. Baker (North Texas) : My question is to Bishop Armstrong that 
in item No. 6 of the clarification on line 2, it says "analyze their 
investments in corporations holding military contracts." I would like 
his explanation of what is meant by military contracts. In order to 
lead him into my thought about this, do you infer here or interpret 
this to mean, all contracts from the armed services of the United 
States. 

Bishop Armstrong: I don't believe that my view at this point is a 
vitally important thing nor is that really of the body of Bishops 
before you. We have attempted in each of these items to be flexible 
so that those who are assuming responsibility can apply their own 
valid and Christian interpretation to the words. We have attempted 
to shy away from being too specific, too particular, leaving the 
initiative to those who are doing the interpreting in the boards and 
agencies and who have responsibilities in the corporate structure 
in the nations. So there is no fast definition before us. 

Mrs. Robert J. Hoover (Iowa) moved to amend the 
Bishops' Call by editing it to remove male-oriented language. 
The amendment was accepted by Bishop Armstrong on 
behalf of the committee. Robert E. Cushman (North Caro- 
lina) moved the previous question on all that was before 
the Conference. The call for the previous question was 
supported. 

The main motion to endorse the Bishops' Call and to 
support the recommendations for its implementation was 
put to a vote and adopted. 

Question Regarding Judicial Council Decision 

Melvin G. T albert (Southern Cahfornia-Arizona) asked 
if it was possible to get the Judicial Council Decision regard- 
ing the seating of delegates. Leon Hickman (Judicial Coun- 
cil) reported that the decision would be ready Friday 
morning. 

Time Extended 

The Chair noted that it was near the time for adjourn- 
ment and asked the will of the Conference. Paul A. Duffey 
(Alabama- West Florida) moved an extension of the time to 
hear both of the reports remaining on the agenda. The 
motion failed to carry. 

Robert E. Hayes, Sr. (Texas) noted that several of the 
black college presidents had flown to Atlanta for this session 
in order to be present when the report of the Commission 



340 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

on the Black Colleges was presented; he moved to extend 
the time for ten minutes for the presentation of that report. 
John T. King (Southwest Texas) moved to amend the 
motion to allow twenty minutes. Kenneth Cooper (Alabama- 
West Florida) moved a substitute that the Agenda Commit- 
tee be instructed to schedule the report as the first item 
of business for Friday morning. The substitute was defeated. 
The amendment to extend the time twenty minutes was 
adopted. 

Commission on the Black Colleges of The United Methodist 
Church (see page 1676) 

Bishop James S. Thomas, Iowa Area, was recognized 
for the presentation of the report. Bishop Thomas presented 
the presidents of the United Methodist black colleges : Isaac 
Miller, Bennett College ; Richard V. Moore, Bethune-Cook- 
man (College; Hubert V. Manning, Claflin College; Vivian 
Henderson, C^lark College; John T. King, Huston-Tillotson 
College; Raijmon White, Morristown College; Lucius Pitts, 
Paine College ; Walter R. Hazzard, Philander Smith College ; 
W. A. McMillan, Rust College; Robert E. Hayes, Wiley 
College; and Lloyd Elam, Meharry Medical College. 

Bishop Thomas: Now, Mr. Chairman, not to add any further to the 
time in which you have given I would like to attempt this report with 
what I feel to be the weight, both of the fact and the emotion, which 
come to focus at this time. If this General Conference were to hear 
me say that it is now at this very moment in the position to support 
a plan which would literally release a dispersed army of people in 
our society that would make a tremendous difference in the quality 
of our society, you would immediately think that I am trying to sell 
you something. 

I respect you too much for that, and you respect me too much to 
listen to that if it is only a sales pitch. There are no bargain base- 
ments to the business of education. It is a matter of devotion and of 
support, and I propose to come immediately to the points that bring 
us here at this time. Let me therefore divide these few words into 
three or four simple statements which you will find adequately 
documented in this report. But it carries with it a flood of other facts 
to be found in documented history which I do not have the time 
to recount. 

First, this report comes to you as the evidence of our historic 
commitment to the support of black colleges. The history is much too 
much to be recounted here. Just at the end of the war, there arose 
several organizations for what was then called the relief of the freed- 
men. Four to six million black people were released and became 
freed to face the burden of their own support with lack of education. 
Our church immediately rushed into the vacuum. Fifty-nine schools 
were planted the first year throughout the South where most of 
these people were. People were going to school learning their letters, as 
it was then said, rather quaintly, as grandmothers and grandfathers. 

There is a tremendous romance here and one would dare not begin 
to tell this kind of story at this late hour. The only point is that the 
historic commitment is clear and concise and meaningful. It is per- 
haps providential that we meet here in 1972, one century to the year, 



The United Methodist Church 341 

after the Methodist Church officially adopted the Freedmen's Aid 
Society as a benevolent institution, as the General Conference of 1872 
began to support the Freedmen's Aid Society which had come into 
existence six years earlier, when those ministers and laymen, a volun- 
tary group of Methodists, a caucus if you will, met in Trinity 
Church, Cincinnati, and there formed the Freedmen's Aid Society. 

One hundred years hence and since that time we have been support- 
ing these colleges. We have done well but never enough to get over 
the hump. And it is a historic hump about which we speak now. 

Second, I would like to speak very briefly about where these colleges 
are in their life and in their history. 

In 1968 another General Conference committed itself to making this 
a high priority. In 1970 this became the Negro College Advance. This 
is 1972; we bring you a report which comes from your commission. 
The study of the black college is thoroughly documented in every 
detail. Now just one or two words about the recommendations that 
you will find here. Knowing now that the business of financing edu- 
cation is more serious than it has ever been before, we would underline 
recommendation three and recommendation five. The other seven 
recommendations are highly important, but these must be understood. 

I do not agree with the college president who felt that every 
problem he had could be cured by $20 million. They could not be. You 
could not cure that simplistic answer, for example. Money can't cure 
everything, but it goes a long way toward providing the atmosphere in 
which quality education can take place; and these twelve institutions, 
now all accredited, come to place befoi'e this General Conference the 
plea to do what has never been done in history — to make them ade- 
quate in terms of the times, in terms of educational standards and 
in terms of accreditation. 

Also among the recommendations, in order to be very fair with the 
church and understanding of the church's position, we will be asking 
at the appropriate time for a continuing commission, to be sure that 
the stewardship here exercised can be a valid stewardship on our 
part. Anything less than that would not be worthy of us. The time 
will not permit me to go further. We were challenged by Bishbp 
Wicke to ask for and expect a miracle. We do. We expect the miracle 
that this General Conference, understanding the weight of the cen- 
tury upon these institutions, will accept and support the request for 
$6 million a year and will subsequently pay that amount, that these 
institutions might release that army of people into the world to 
make a mighty difference in the quality of our culture. I know what 
it means personally to go to one of these institutions, to become an 
economic burden upon that institution because there was not money 
to pay for it. There is not time for a personal testimony, but I must 
say that were it not for these institutions and were it not for the 
Crusade Scholarship Fund, I as one person would not find it possible 
to be here. 

And so, Mr. Chairman and members of the General Conference, 
this is not nearly all that should be said; it is possibly all that ought 
to be said under these circumstances. We are perfectly willing to leave 
this in the hands of the General Conference remembering the tremen- 
dous responsibility and the opportunity for investment which we 
have that every dollar — removing all of the sentimental and human 
considerations from the picture — every dollar invested in this amount 
will multiply itself five times over as the foundations and others 
who see the good intentions of the Methodist Church will respond as 
they have not in the past century to the needs of these colleges. 
Now, Mr. Chairman, President John King will have just a word in 
support of this statement. 



342 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Bishop Wertz: Thank you, Bishop Thomas. 

John T. King (Southwest Texas) : Bishop Wertz and members of the 
General Conference. I think it is sufficient for me to say that these 
colleges are depending upon you. You created us. You nurtured us. 
To some extent across the years you have sustained us. But now is 
the time for you to come to our aid as you have never done before. 
Now is the time for you to join us in making possible the future 
which can be ours together. The hundreds of thousands of young 
people who are yet to walk across the campuses of these and other 
institutions are depending vipon us and the decisions which we make 
at this place, at this time. 

So, Bishop Wertz, and members of the General Conference, the 
Plan of Organization of this General Conference provides that reports 
from special study committees ought to be referred automatically to 
the appropriate legislative committees for study. I do not believe that 
a motion of reference is necessary. However, in order that there be 
no mistake, I move that the report of the Commission on the Black 
Colleges of The United Methodist Church be referred to the Committee 
on Reference for referral to the appropriate legislative committees 
and such other General Conference committees as will be appropriate. 

Bishop Wertz: The motion is regularly before you. It is a motion 
of reference. Are you ready? All who will support it will show the 
hand. Opposed. And it is done. Thank you very much. We express 
our very sincere appreciation. 

Closing 

Announcements were made by the Secretary-Designate, 
J. B. Holt. Bishop Richard C. Raines, Retired, dismissed 
the Conference with a prayer. 



SIXTH DAY, FRIDAY, APRIL 21, 1972 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening — Bishop Reuben H. Mueller 

Pursuant to adjournment, the General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church convened in the morning session 
of the sixth day, Friday, April 21, 1972, at 8 :30 a.m. in 
the Civic Center, Atlanta, Georgia, with Bishop Reuben H. 
Mueller, Indiana Area, presiding. 

Devotions 

Choral music was presented by the McMurry College 
Chanters, McMurry College, Abilene, Texas, under the 
direction of Bernhardt Tiede. The Conference sang the 
hymn, "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name" ; the hymn was 
followed by a unison prayer and a litany from "Choruses 
from the Rock" by T. S. Eliot. The hymn "Blow Ye the 
Trumpet, Blow" was sung, followed by the reading of Luke 
4:18-19 and Romans 8:2-14. Bishop Charles F. Golden, 
San Francisco Area, spoke on the subject, "The Church 
Liberated-! For What-?" (see page 741). The liturgist was 
Richard 0. Johnson (California-Nevada). 

General Conference Business Manager 

The Chair recognized Norman L. Conard, General Con- 
ference Business Manager, for a statement. Mr. Conard 
explained that due to an unexpectedly large crowd at the 
preaching service the previous afternoon, it had been neces- 
sary to move that service to the Civic Center. He asked 
that persons who were unable to locate material left on their 
desks notify a page, and every effort would be made to 
find or replace such material. 

Committee on Journal 

George R. Akers (Wyoming) reported that the journal for 
April 20 had been received and approved by the Committee. 

Committee on Agenda 

Douglas F. Verdin (New York) reported on behalf of 
the Committee on Agenda that the plan for Saturday, April 
21, was to have plenary sessions both in the morning and 
afternoon for the purpose of hearing reports and considering 
calendar items. Mr. Verdin moved the adoption of the agenda 
for Friday, including this session and afternoon and 
evening sessions of legislative committees, as printed in the 

343 



344 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Daily Christian Advocate. The agenda was adopted. Mr. 
Verdin noted that a report from the Judicial Council was 
scheduled as a part of the report of the Committee on Cre- 
dentials. He also called attention to the special music and 
preaching service scheduled for the afternoon at First 
United Methodist Church. 

Committee on Credentials 

W. T. Handy, Jr. (Louisiana) reported that the Commit- 
tee had met and examined the changes in the seating of 
delegates reported by the chairpersons of annual conference 
delegations, and that the changes would appear in the 
proper form in the journal. He moved the adoption of the 
report, and it was adopted. 

Judicial Council Decision No. 354 

Murray H. Leiffer, president of the Judicial Council, called 
attention to Decision No. 354 as printed in the Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate (see Journal, page 688). 

Melvin G. Talbert (Southern California-Arizona) moved 
that, in Hght of the Judicial Council Decision, the 1972 
General Conference seat those persons affected by the 
decision with their respective delegations without vote and 
with their expenses paid. The motion was adopted. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) announced that the 
presiding officers for Saturday's session would be Bishop 
H. Ellis Finger, Jr., Nashville Area, for the morning session, 
and Bishop A. James Armstrong, Dakota Area, for the 
afternoon session. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) stated that the 
Committee was recommending Conference consideration of 
three matters of privilege at this session. She asked that 
Benedict A. Galloway (Louisiana) be recognized. Mr. Gallo- 
way announced that it had been necessary for Robert F. 
Harrington (Louisiana) to leave the Conference due to the 
death of his mother, and moved that the Conference send 
a message of condolence. The motion was adopted. 

Mrs. Little requested that William H. Ruff (North 
Georgia) be recognized for a matter of privilege. Mr. Ruff 
moved that the Conference ask the Agenda Committee to 
establish an order of the day for fifteen minutes in the 
Saturday session to commemorate the life of Dr. Martin 
Luther King, Jr. The motion was adopted. 



The United Methodist Church 345 

Mrs. Little asked that William L. Bates, Jr. (Seminarian 
Delegation) and Bevel Jones (North Georgia) be recognized 
for a matter of privilege. Mr. Bates expressed concern 
regarding the large quantity of paper waste generated by 
the Conference and stated that he had asked Mr. Jones 
whether some appropriate action could be taken. 

Bevel Jones (North Georgia) : Mr. Bates has talked with us about 
this. We share his concern. We appreciate his, and his colleagues', 
spirit of stewardship. Therefore, I move, and we are prepared to 
implement this, that the Conference commend and honor the concern 
of the seminarians, and that we carefully and responsibly arrange all 
printed matter, not to be kept by delegates and visitors, so that it 
can be systematically collected by the Local Committee on Arrange- 
ments and prepared for recycling, and that the money derived there- 
from be given to the Fund for Reconciliation. 

The motion was adopted. 

Committee on Review (see page 1916) 

The Chair recognized Roy J. Grogan (Central Texas), 
chairman of the Committee on Review, for the presentation 
of the report. Mr. Grogan called attention to the printed 
report of the Committee, noting particularly that portion 
of the report in which the Committee recommended that 
certain of its functions be assigned to other agencies and 
that the Committee be discontinued. He stated that legisla- 
tion to accomplish this purpose had been presented to the 
General Conference. 

Regarding Committee Report No. 2, Mr. Grogan said 
that because the Committee did not seek its own continued 
existence, it felt itself in a unique position to comment on 
the issue of restructuring being considered by the Confer- 
ence. Mr. Grogan summarized the material contained in 
Committee Report No. 2 as printed. 

Inasmuch as the report required no action, Mr. Grogan 
moved that it be received, and that Report No. 2 be referred 
to the appropriate legislative committees by the Committee 
on Reference. The Chair stated that this did not require 
Conference action and would be done under the rules of 
the Conference. 

Program Council (see page 1771) 

The Chair recognized Bishop W. Ralph Ward (Syracuse 
Area), president of the Program Council. Bishop Ward 
introduced Paid V. Church, general secretary of the Pro- 
gram Council, and Gerald L. Clapsaddle, Hoivard Greenivalt 
and Harry C. Spencer, associate general secretaries. He 
also expressed appreciation to Bishop R. Marvin Stuart 
(Denver Area), Bishop Aubrey G. Walton (Louisiana 



346 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Area), and Robert A. Uphoff, vice-presidents of the Pro- 
gram Council. Bishop Ward then presented John B. War- 
man (Western Pennsylvania), Paid V. Church, and Theo- 
dore C. Mayer (East Ohio), who would assist in the pres- 
entation of the report. 

Mr. Warman presented those portions of the printed 
Program Council report contained in Part I, Proposed 
Legislation, item 1 (Paragraphs 801-821) and item 2 (Para- 
graphs 822-836 and 1392-1397). He explained the stated 
purpose of each of the proposed legislative changes. 

Paul v. Church presented the proposed legislation con- 
tained in Part I, item 3, under the heading, "United Meth- 
odist Council on Youth Ministry." He stated that since 
this Council was administratively related to the Program 
Council's Division of Coordination, the Program Council 
was transmitting this legislation to the General Conference. 
He proceeded with the presentation of Part I, item 4 (Para- 
graphs 841.5 and 843) and item 5 (Paragraph 844). Mr. 
Church explained the purpose of each of the proposed 
legislative changes. 

Bishop Ward presented proposed legislation contained 
in Part I of the report, item 6 (Paragraph 869), explaining 
that this would give the Program Council a voice in any 
budgetary changes necessitated by emergencies or the chang- 
ing of priorities between sessions of the General Conference. 

Theodore C. Mayer (East Ohio) presented proposed 
legislation for the Advance as contained in Part I, item 7 
(Paragraphs 871-878), explaining the purpose of each of 
the proposed changes. 

Mr. Church presented the remaining items of proposed 
legislation contained in Part I, item 8 (Paragraph 153), 
item 9 (Paragraph 161.4) and item 10 (Paragraph 162.2), 
explaining the purpose of each. 

Mr. Church then referred the Conference to Part II of 
the Program Council's printed report, dealing with Program 
Council recommendations on matters referred to it by the 
1968 and 1970 General Conferences. He noted that items 1, 
2, and 3 had already been properly referred and that item 4 
would be dealt with separately. He stated material contained 
in Part III of the report, items 1-6, was related to Part II, 
item 4, and would be presented with it. 

Mr. Church called attention to Part III, items 7 and 8, 
which he identified as resolutions related to the work of 
TRAFCO. He then referred to Part IV, Decisions, calling 
attention specifically to item 9, permission granted for the 
holding of various national conferences in the next quad- 
rennium. 



The United Methodist Church 347 

Mr. Church then presented Part V, Recommendations and 
Responses, calling attention to item 5, dealing with priority- 
issues, program plans and suggested resources as submitted 
to the Program Council by the general program agencies. 

Mr. Church: This is one of the most significant things, I believe, 
that has happened in the entire quadrennium in the life of the Pro- 
gi*am Council. The proposals that have been submitted are in relation 
to the presentation that will come following the recess in the area 
of Planning for Ministry — '73 and Beyond. The boards were asked 
to submit their plans in the event that the General Conference adopted 
these proposed priorities. I have spent a good many hours trying to 
internalize the whole scope of those plans. I would covet for each of 
you that type of an experience, to get something of a grasp of the 
scope of the programs of general agencies of The United Methodist 
Church as they seek to be in mission in the far corners of the earth, 
throughout our homelands, and to discover the kind of plans that 
are being made to help in resourcing annual conferences and local 
churches for their mission. It is tremendous, and all that I can say 
in regard to these 500 proposals is that there is very little overlap, 
very little duplication in them. The real problem is that there are so 
many holes, so many places where we ought to be in mission where 
so very little is being proposed. 

Report Received and Referred 

Edward G. Carroll (Baltimore) moved that the report of 
the Program Council be received and that the recommenda- 
tion for the appointment of a commission to study the 
jurisdictional system (Part II, item 1) and the resolutions 
contained in Part III, items 7 and 8, be referred to the 
Committee on Reference. The Chair ruled that this would 
be done under the rules of the Conference and no motion 
of referral was required. 

Study Commission on the Participation of Women in The 

United Methodist Church (see page 1732) 

Bishop Thomas M. Pryor (Chicago Area) was recognized 
for the presentation of the report. Bishop Pryor directed the 
Conference's attention to the printed report which had been 
distributed and to the resolutions and proposed legislative 
changes included in it and also printed as Part III, items 1-6, 
of the Program Council report. He introduced Donald B. 
App, Robert B. Goodivin, Myrna Gum, Doris Handy, Ernes- 
tine McKinney, Christine Modisher, Linda Patrick, Harvey 
H. Sander and Robert A. Uphoff as members of the commis- 
sion, and Gerald L. Clapsaddle and Ala^i K. Waltz as Pro- 
gram Council staff consultants. He reviewed the purpose of 
the Commission as stated in the report and presented Linda 
Patrick to explain the recommendations and goals. 

Mrs. Patrick: The issue of the participation of women in the life 
and work of the denomination cannot be considered in isolation from 
the entire issue of the role of women in society and in all of life. 



348 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Part of the general genesis of the issue which is currently manifest 
within the organizational patterns and structures of the church is 
found in the lack of concern indicated by society in general and the 
Christian community in particular for the enablement of all persons. 
The affirmation of the personhood of the individual must be more 
than just an affirmation. It must be translated into action. It is in 
this context of affirmation as a prior condition to action that the 
study commission gave considerable time and thought of a discussion 
of goals for The United Methodist Church in the area of the enable- 
ment of women as persons, in their involvement in the Christian 
community, and in their participation in the organizational structures 
of the denomination. The goals which were formulated are presented 
so that a sense of concern, purpose, and direction can be developed 
by the denomination. This statement of goals is to serve as the start- 
ing point for rechanneling of attention, concern, energy and resources, 
to enhance the God-given potential of each person regardless of sex. 

Mrs. Patrick presented the specific recommendations 
contained in the printed report of the study commission 
under the heading "Recommendations for the Enhancement 
of the Participation of Women." 

Bishop Pryor presented the six resolutions and proposed 
amendments to the Book of Discipline as proposed by the 
study commission in its report. In connection with the 
resolution regarding male-oriented and/or discriminatory 
language in the Book of Discipline, Bishop Pryor cited 
examples and stated that, if the resolution was approved by 
the General Conference, a book enumerating the disciplinary 
paragraphs needing change would be presented to the editors 
of the Book of Discipline. He noted also that three of the 
resolutions were in the form of constitutional amendments 
which would change male-oriented language in the constitu- 
tion of the church. 

Bishop Pryor then presented Doris M. Handy (Western 
Pennsylvania) for a statement and motion of reference. 

Miss Handy: Mr. Chairman and Members of the Delegation: In con- 
cluding the report of this study committee, I merely want to lift up 
for you the privilege and the joy it has been to participate with a 
committee so dedicated to its task. The committee has been wholly 
committed and brings a unanimous report to you. All that you have 
heard and all that is in your hands has not one dissenting vote. 

The committee wants the General Conference of 1972 of The United 
Methodist Church to realize and put into motion machinery that will 
help all United Methodists understand and, yea, even beyond the 
Methodist Church, that we know that the hands that rock the cradles 
and serve the rolls and extend the courtesies are attached to warm 
hearts, hearts that have been strangely warmed, and clear minds which 
can make decisions and handle even the gavel effectively. We must 
then become a church in which the potentials of all, male and female, 
or, if you prefer, men and women, will be utilized to the fullest; 
and, thus, we present this report to you today. 

Mr. Chairman, I move that the Report of the Committee to Study 
the Role and Participation of Women in the Program and Policy- 
Making Channels of The United Methodist Church be referred to 
the Committee on Reference for referral to the appropriate legislative 
committees. 



The United Methodist Church 349 

The Chair stated that the report would be referred in 
accordance with the rules of the Conference and that no 
motion of referral was required. 

Georgia Night 

The Chair recognized Gene Carroll for a statement on 
behalf of the Local Committee regarding a dramatic and 
media presentation entitled "The Bridge," planned for 
presentation on Saturday and Sunday evenings at Georgia 
Night. Mr. Carroll introduced his associate Dave Abernathy, 
who presented the song "A Man Named Wesley Passed This 
Way," which was to be a part of the production. 

Recess 

/. B. Holt (Secretary-Designate) made announcements, 
and the Conference was in recess for fifteen minutes. 
Following the recess the Conference was led in the singing 
of the hymn "Joy to the World" by Carlton Young. 

Recognition of Georgia Harkness 

The Chair recognized Pauline Bobbitt (Southern Cali- 
fornia-Arizona) for a matter of privilege. 

Pauline Bobbitt: Bishop Mueller, this has been a very special day 
for women attending this General Conference, and it is a special 
day for one woman member of the Conference, and a Delegate of the 
Southern California-Arizona Conference. Dr. Georgia Harkness has 
long been a champion and advocate for the liberation of all men 
and women. This is her birthday. We believe it would be fitting that 
Dr. Harkness be recognized at this time. 

Dr. Harkness was accorded a standing ovation by the 
Conference. 

Georgia Harkness (Southern California- Arizona) : This is a tribute 
which moves me very deeply indeed. I can hardly find words to express 
my gratitude, and it is perhaps unusual for me to fail to find words. 
The General Conferences have been more than gracious to me, year 
after year. This happens to be my sixth. It might be said I'm a "hardy 
perennial." But above all the things that have come to me, you 
touch my heart deeply. This is the greatest. And with the action taken 
this morning in regard to the place of women in the church, I can 
say that I believe the Kingdom is nearer than when we believed. 
Thank you. 

Bishop Mueller: Thank you very much. Dr. Harkness, we are honored 
with your presence. We return to our agenda to pick up the report 
of the Committee on the Advance, Bishop Ward. 

The Advance (see page 1693) 

Bishop W. Ralph Ward, Syracuse Area, directed the 
attention of the Conference to the printed report of the 
Advance Committee, entitled "The Advance: Partnership 
in the Seventies." He introduced Dr. Thomas F. Guffin, a 



350 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

surgeon and member of The Peachtree Road United Meth- 
odist Church, Atlanta, Georgia, for a statement regarding 
the Advance. 

Dr. Guffin: When I was asked to speak to you about Advance Specials 
I spent some time talking to the members of our congregation, the 
ministers and the local administrative leaders, in an attempt to give 
you a very brief, concise, but yet honest, statement on what Advance 
Special means to my local church, Peachtree Road United Methodist. 

As one of the larger contributors to Advance Specials in Methodism, 
I think the feeling is that we feel more than a duty, we feel an actual 
need to participate in this that we call our second line of giving. Now 
participation in Conference Benevolences are an integral and neces- 
sary part of our mission thrust and represents our first line of giving 
to missions, without which the entire mission endeavor would falter. 
But we must recognize, in the local church, that these benevolences 
passed down from a General Conference to a Jurisdictional Confer- 
ence to an Annual Conference, to a local Charge Conference are often 
far removed from the conscience and concerns of the average mem- 
ber of a congregation. 

Sometimes it is only through the efforts of the Women's Society of 
Christian Service that we men are aware of them at all unless some 
of us are actually involved in the administration of these funds. 
So they are far removed from our consciences unless we dig down 
to see what they are, but this Conference and the Board of Missions 
has, in its wisdom, provided a second line of giving, the Advance 
Special that allows for a more personal involvement and commitment 
to missions. Generally, given a choice of mission thiaist, the average 
person, class or church will receive a greater satisfaction from time 
and money spent in giving to an Advance Special than from any 
other benevolence; thus the total giving to missions is advanced 
through giving through the Advance Special. 

Now, in addition, there is a more prosaic reason for support of 
Advance Specials. This is simply the fact that without this two- 
pronged approach to missions the local administrative aspects of the 
local ministry simply cannot be supported, cannot be financially sup- 
ported. We as leaders of the local church recognize that there is a 
need to share and that this need must be balanced against the local 
administrative needs. One without the other ^vill falter. 

The opportunities for selection of an Advance Special are limitless, 
whether you choose missionary personnel, evangelism, community 
development, emergency needs over the world, education through 
schools and colleges, or any other of the opportunities for Christian 
witness. Through participation in an Advance Special every member 
of your congregation can answer in the affirmative the question of 
our Lord when he said ". . . did you offer me shelter; when I was 
naked did you clothe me, when I was hungry did you feed me?" 
Thank you. 

Bishop Ward stated that it had been the intention of the 
Advance Committee to ask Stephen Brimigion, treasurer of 
the Board of Missions, to make a statement about the mean- 
ing of the Advance to the Board of Missions and UMCOR, 
but that this statement was being omitted in the interest of 
conserving time. He called attention to "A Living Litany of 
Thanksgiving," which had been prepared for liturgical use 
(see page 1696). He also noted the list of participants who 



The United Methodist Church 351 

had been scheduled to participate, expressing gratitude for 
their presence. 

Planning for Ministries — 1973 and Beyond 

Bishop W. Ralph Ward, by way of introduction to this 
portion of the Program Council's report, referred the Con- 
ference to several printed materials which had been mailed 
to delegates or placed on their desks : Listening to the 
Church, by Virgil Sexton; Planning for Ministries — 1973 
and Beijond; a Resource Booklet (for illustrative purposes 
only) ; and a Summary Book, Planning for Ministries — 1973 
and Beyond. Bishop Ward summarized the background and 
the process, as contained in the printed report, which had 
resulted in this recommendation for a program planning 
process to be used at all levels of the church in the new 
quadrennium. He then introduced Virgil W. Sexton, assistant 
general secretary of the Section on Planning of the Program 
Council. 

Mr. Sexton summarized the method by which participa- 
tion of local church and annual conference personnel in the 
planning process was solicited and obtained. He noted some 
of the results arising from the analysis of the data collected ; 
he noted that much of the material had been summarized 
in the book. Listening to the Church — A Realistic Profile 
of Grassroots Opinion. 

Mr. Sexton: Now what did we learn? Well, we learned a lot. For 
one thing, we had to change some misconceptions that we had had. 
We had expected to find apathy, instead we found not apathy but a 
seeming feeling of hopelessness about how to influence Church 
leadership to listen to what they felt needed to be done. We had 
expected to find sectionalism; instead we found that all jurisdictions 
were agreed on what the priorities ought to be. Differences of opinion 
did appear of how we should go about doing something about the 
priorities, but even that was not regionally; that was general through- 
out the church. 

We had expected to find a wave of Congregationalism sweeping 
the denomination, demands to leave the local church alone, if you 
please. Instead, we found connectionalism strongly reaffirmed by 
United Methodists. They forcefully noted, however, that connec- 
tionalism must be two-way. There must be provision for input up 
from the local church, as well as output down from leadership. By 
comparing response by age, sex, size of church and etc. we found 
great agreement on the priorities by all, except for one age group 
and one size of church. 

The response from the age group 45 to 54 departed from the normal 
response on every question except one. They agreed that more lay 
participation in decision-making was at the highest priority among 
the needs of the church. The size of the church whose responses 
departed most sharply from those of others was not the small church, 
as some would have supposed, but rather seemed to be the church 
with 500 to 1000 members. That size of church seemed to be over- 
preoccupied with getting more members to get more money to pay 



352 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

more debts. Perhaps they have over-extended their budget with build- 
ing. But beyond these general observations there was high agreement 
from participants on the priorities with which The United Methodist 
Church must be in mission in three areas: 

1. Trends of the time. 

2. Sharp issues of the day. 

3. Needs of the church, both that which needs to be strengthened 
and that which may need eliminating. 

General trends of the time which received the highest expression 
of concern were: the continuing cries of persons to be allowed and to 
be enabled to be fully human; the gaps between cultures and sub- 
cultures in society; the increase in secularity; rapidly increasing 
rates of change; and the trend for groups to organize intentionally 
to bring change. Sharp issues of the day to which United Methodists 
give high priority are minority group demands and the church's 
response to them, world peace and the morality of war, living in the 
time of possible total extinction of the human race, the cheapness 
with which human life is held today and family life sex patterns 
and life-styles. 

Now, minor change in the expression on issues is noted as data 
continues to come in to the Program Council. For the past eleven 
months the intensity of expression on world peace and the morality 
of war and the whole spectrum of violence in our society has exceeded 
concern about minority group demand. Now this change is noted as 
minor because these issues remain the two highest concerns. 

The more churchly priorities, needs of the denomination we would 
call them, which are the deepest concerns of our people are: the 
need of more lay involvement at all levels of decision making, the 
need for deeper commitment to God and resulting commitment to 
service, the crisis in the professional ministry, clarifying communica- 
tions channels in the denomination, and the need for more opportunity 
to designate funds as a part of responsible involvement. These trends, 
issues, and church needs of highest expressed concern received serious 
consideration in the projection of priorities for the next quadrennium. 

Before discussing the priorities which had emerged from 
the data, Mr. Sexton noted two other matters. He said that 
there was widely expressed concern that the possibility of 
a sabbatical year for continuing education by professional 
clergy be made a workable practicality. Secondly, he noted a 
major change in the responses of youth and young adults 
during the last eleven months, from a majority talking 
about social action to a majority talking about commitment 
to Jesus Christ. 

Mr. Sexton asked that the General Conference give con- 
tinuing endorsement to the process and that The United 
Methodist Church be asked to engage in process planning at 
all levels in a style which each unit finds most workable in 
its own situation. He then summarized the three basic priori- 
ties and the four ministry priorities; he noted that each 
was developed more fully in the printed report. 

In concluding his presentation Mr. Sexton reviewed the 
section of the Suynmary Book headed, "Where Is the 
Focus?" citing the Bishops' Call for Peace and the Self- 
Development of Peoples as representing the style of ap- 



The United Methodist Church 353 

proach which was being recommended in Planning for Min- 
istries. He then introduced three persons for presentation 
of other possible points of focus in the planning process 
being recommended: Joseph H. Yeakel, general secretary 
of the Board of Evangelism; Bruce P. Blake, program 
director of the Kansas West Conference ; and Fred Gruner, 
a member of Mequon United Methodist Church in the 
Wisconsin Conference. 

Joseph Yeakel: As process planning has come into the life of the 
Program Council of the church, then the question is, "How does an 
agency of the church or general board relate to it?" 

About the same time that we were beginning to isolate for our 
concern the priorities of Commitment, Renewal, Nurture, etc., our 
Concern for Persons, on the horizon was what has now become to be 
known as Key '73. No doubt the broadest ecumenical venture of any 
program or form on the North American continent. Key '73 is an 
attempt to face very honestly the challenge which evangelism has 
in the life of the church in this day. I do not intend to report on the 
programmatic design that is in our report (and also we hope to have 
some time on the agenda next week to share with you some of these 
concerns), but we do believe it fits into the life-style of a general 
agency in relationship to process planning. 

Following the General Conference in 1970, since Key '73 was 
already in its formative stages, a number of persons raised with us 
the question, "Why did you not petition the General Conference that 
Key '73 become a formal program of The United Methodist Church?" 
It is exactly because we believe that this style of offering to the 
church opportunities for its own programming is exactly the way a 
general agency should respond. 

The Discipline mandates us to participate in these areas of our 
responsibilities, but it does not tell us the style of participation. 
Therefore, we have chosen to represent you in the committees that 
have been setting the plans and providing the resources, some of them 
motivation. We have tried to represent you well and honestly, but 
we did not wish to concretize that effort by making it a program 
adopted by the General Conference. 

Secondly, we have had the privilege of bringing together a national 
advisory council. We have also met with the Continuing Coordinating 
Committee so that the other agencies of the chui'ch would be informed 
as to the progress of Key '73, and beyond that we have had many 
bi-lateral and multi-lateral meetings with agencies to orient them 
and to share together the resources that would be helpful for the entire 
church. This is the attempt of an agency to affirm the process 
planning style. 

We affirm in the local church that the pastor has, indeed, a ministry 
of enablement. Therefore, the general agencies of the church ought 
to be engaged in a ministry which evokes in him and his congregation, 
or evokes in her and her congregation, a response to the opportunities 
that are available. Key '73 is such an opportunity. 

My counterpart in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, as he 
was thinking about the church's participation in Key '73 the other 
day, said he was stopped at a race track where some mechanics were 
tuning-up a very expensive racing car, but he had no real idea what 
it cost, but after the mechanics had finished their work he said they 
rolled it out on the track to give it a test run and to his surprise this 
multi-thousand car was set into motion by an old junker. There is a 
very real parallel here in that we have all of the mechanism necessary 



354 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

in the local churches in the denomination, indeed, on this continent, 
to be about the evangelism ministry. Perhaps Key '73 can be that 
"junker" that gets it moving. We do affirm the life-style of process 
planning, and we find it quite compatible w^ith agency responsibility. 

Bruce P. Blake (Kansas West) : During the last three years the 
Kansas West Conference has been involved in process planning. We 
share our experience with you of how it is working for us. To do 
this, I simply want to raise three issues related to process planning, 
some discoveries we've made about process planning related to these 
issues, and, quite frankly, some "deaths" that we have experienced. 

The first issue is planning. We have discovered through process 
planning that the basic planning unit of The United Methodist 
Church must be the local church, for that which is local is felt, 
whether it be pain and hurt or ministry to alleviate that pain and 
that hurt. We are convinced that until we become effective locally, 
we will not become effective in ministry to persons. This simply 
means that plans, if they are to be carried out locally, must be made 
locally. Therefore, the Annual Conference found that we must help 
local churches plan instead of planning for them. This implies a 
death — the death of a parental attitude of the Annual Conference 
towards the local church — the idea that we really know best. That 
death has been painful, for when the Annual Conference has found 
meaning in being a parent, it is tough to be childless. 

The second issue is participation, for we have discovered that 
persons will participate, both lay and clergy. In our Annual Con- 
ference we have found broad participation in writing the purpose 
and the objectives of the Annual Conference. The local church did 
this in about ninety listening events in local churches. And we have 
found that this participation is a humanizing experience, allowing 
local churches and persons at the local level to be involved in the 
decisions that affect them. But this implies a death — the death of 
dialogue and discussion within the bureaucracy — the bureaucracy 
talking to itself. This dies as grass roots participation increases. 

The third issue is a theological one, for we have discovered a new 
sense of hope resulting from a future orientation of our faith that 
I think is a meaning of the kingdom of God for our day, the sense 
that the decisions that we are making today have an impact on the 
future and are indeed forming the future. Through process planning 
we have discovered a new sense of hope for new ways for new days. 
But, along with this hope, there is another death — the death of those 
seven last words of the church — "It has never been done this 
way before." 

Finally, in summary, I would just mention that this process implies 
failure. Our experience sometimes has been like that young flanker 
back in high school who on the last play of the ball game as the clock 
ran out, caught a pass on the forty yard line and streaked toward 
the opponent's goal line. He was at least ten yards, I'm sure, ahead 
of any other opponent when his own knee came up and hit the ball 
out of his hand. He fumbled, the opponent fell on the ball, and sure 
victory was turned into defeat by that fumble. The game was over. 
The crowd, the home crowd, stood in hushed silence as the coach 
rushed out to that boy on the field. The crowd expected him to 
chastise that player, but, instead, he threw his arms around that boy 
and said, "That's all right, son, you were headed in the right direction." 

Possibly this is a new criterion for our ministry as we commit 
ourselves to process planning — not the criterion of success, but the 
criterion of being headed in the right direction, the right direction 
of local church planning, broad participation and decision making, 
and a sense of hope about the future of the church. 



The United Methodist Church 355 

Fred Gruner: Bishop Mueller, members of the conference. Our jour- 
ney began fifteen months ago when the Milwaukee District of the 
Wisconsin Conference chose Mequon United Methodist Church as 
an experiment for developing suburban local church renewal. The 
interboard MUST-II team was to work with us as a resource group 
along with the Milwaukee Metropolitan Minister, who was adept at 
group process planning. At that time we were typical of many 
suburban churches of five hundred members, financially solvent with 
good physical facilities, but with a leadership and participation limited 
to a handful. 

Our planning then consisted of dealing with the routine everyday 
needs, but with no long range goals, particularly in the key area of 
spirit life and humanism. As a key renewal strategy it was decided 
that we would experiment with the congregation participating in a 
workshop on a three year plan. Our minister, our Council on Ministries 
and outside research personnel would act only to enable the planning. 
We named our experiment Genesis 70's, anticipating a new birth. 
We chose four key areas: worship, study. Christian care and mission. 
In each the congregation was to determine the need, set the goal, 
decide on the strategy, assign priorities with target dates. The 
planning was done in what we chose to call a Saturday Council — a 
typical Council involved approximately eighty members of our congre- 
gation. They consisted of providing study input and worshipping in 
the initial chosen areas of worship, study and Christian care. Laymen 
from our congregation were trained to lead the workshop, which was 
structured for all to participate and with all decisions made on a 
consensus basis. Three all-day councils held on consecutive months 
completed the initial phase of our long range planning. 

I could spend considerable time in describing our goals and their 
implementations resulting in ten neighborhood groups, meeting regu- 
larly, involving 20% of our congregation, dealing with person-to-per- 
son care, our youth program and the worship course which we created, 
which recaptures the traditional meaning of Christian worship. In 
addition to our church this worship course has been taught in three 
neighboring churches, and out of the course have come thirty lay 
liturgists who assist the minister in the Sunday morning worship 
service as well as provide written worship materials related to the 
various liturgical seasons. And now for the very first time we as a 
congregation can sit down and begin to discuss our role in missions, 
even in controversial areas. 

However, I would like to spend a few moments that I have with 
you on how individuals have been impacted. As an example, a group 
of approximately forty people involved in the process planning com- 
mitted themselves to establish and enable the goal of ten geographical 
caring groups. 

They participate in a monthly gathering which is called a "house 
church," starting with a communion meal, a service with the actual 
breaking of bread for each other. In the monthly gathering we see 
a spirit that we have not seen present before — like a family preparing 
a Mexican meal and decor so that we can get a global vision as a 
group, or a million-doUar-a-year life insurance salesman advising us 
on how to make a telephone call so we can increase the congregation 
participation, an advertising artist designing a symbolic grid of the 
groups, the corporate body, as a whole, picking up and being con- 
cerned for the cares of individuals. It has become evident that as 
people are involved in the planning process and assume responsibility 
for their goals, they are transformed. Before, they were apathetic; 
now they are interested. Before, no sense of mission; now, a goal. 
Before, passive; now, active. Before, being led; now they become 



356 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

leaders. Before, no sense of community; now, a sense of Christian 
community. 

After fifteen months on our journey, we believe that what we 
finally accomplish will not be measured in how well we implement our 
tactics or strategy, or even if we accomplish our initial goals. It will 
be measured in the fact that we are now free, free to decide and act, 
held together despite our differences by a developing sense of 
Christian community in the word of Jesus Christ. It will be measured 
in the fact that through a deepening of individual commitment an 
involvement of vision is taking shape in the redemptive power of the 
local church and its mission on behalf of all. Perhaps, perhaps renewal 
of the local church is accomplished when that vision is glimpsed. 
Process planning in the local church can help. Thank you. Grace and 
Peace. 

Virgil W. Sexton stated that other local churches, annual 
conferences and general agencies could have been chosen 
as examples of process planning. He called the Conference's 
attention to the Resource Booklet which had been placed on 
delegates' desks, noting that it represented only a small 
sample of the catalogue of resources which would be de- 
veloped if the Conference adopted the report. 

Resolution Introduced 

Mr. Sexton introduced Mrs. Lamar Wilson, a member 
of the Division of Coordination, Research, and Planning, 
who introduced a resolution regarding adoption and imple- 
mentation of Planning for Ministries — 1973 and Beyond 
as contained in the report. Bruce P. Blake (Kansas West) 
moved to suspend the rules in order that the resolution 
could be adopted. The motion was put to the vote and 
received the required two-thirds majority. John B. Warman 
(Western Pennsylvania) moved the adoption of the resolu- 
tion. 

C. LeGrafide Moody, Jr. (South Carolina-1785) moved 
an amendment to the report. He referred to the chart con- 
tained in the report and entitled, "Interrelationship of the 
Priorities," and to the basic priority "Commitment, Renewal, 
and Nurture" within that chart. 

Mr. Moody: I move that it be changed from "Commitment to God 
and commitment to service with all humanity," to the following, 
"Commitment to God through commitment to Jesus Christ whom the 
Father sent to make his true nature known to us, and commitment 
to service with all humanity." If I get a second, I would like to 
speak to it. 

Bishop Mueller: Is it seconded? It is seconded. 

Mr. Moody: In this report, where the priorities are listed, we have 
the concern for persons, and I'm sure those who prepared this intend 
this to be the whole person, including the soul. In this same document, 
the call is to commitment to the teachings of Jesus Christ and in the 
next paragraph a call to the Christian ideal, but nowhere do I see 
where there is call to the person of Jesus Christ. 



The United MetJwdist Church 357 

It seems to me that this needs to be in the basic priority, that we 
make our commitment to God through Jesus Christ whom the Father 
has sent to make his true nature known to us, and then commitment 
to service with all humanity. Now this is not a "Jesus only" proposi- 
tion; to do so would be to negate Jesus himself. It just seems to me 
that a little additional space could be given to include this as a 
top priority of our Church. 

Bishop Ward accepted the amendment on behalf of the 
Program Council, 

Leroy C. Hodapp (South Indiana) asked a question about 
the intended distribution of the resource booklet. Mr. Sexton 
responded that the plan was to distribute the resource 
booklet to district superintendents and annual conference 
program staff persons who could then assist local churches 
in their planning process. 

Everett Jones (Baltimore) : If in adopting the Playining for Minis- 
tries and the priorities, we will then adopt the nomenclature, is this 
correct? That is, Concern for Justice and Human Development is my 
basic question. Does this mean that we have two parallels: a Call 
for Peace and Self-Development of Peoples and a priority that's 
called Concern for Justice and Human Development? Bishop, I'd 
like a clarification. Could these be both called a "Call for Peace and 
Self-Development of Peoples?" 

Mr. Sexton accepted the suggestion. The motion to approve 
the report was put to a vote, and the motion was adopted. 

Theological Study Commission on Doctrine and Doctrinal 

Standards (see page 1988) 

Albert C. Outler (North Texas), chairman of the study 
commission, was recognized for the presentation of the 
report to the Conference for final action. 

Dr. Outler: Mr. Chairman, members of the Conference, under the 
rules on page 226 of the Handbook and your vote on Tuesday morn- 
ing, we come now to the formal consideration of the report of your 
Commission on Doctrine and Doctrinal Standards. You have the report 
in your possession. 

You have heard our presentation and you have had at least some 
time to consider it in the relentless pressures and processes of this 
Conference. We ask you now to act, as we know you will, in the full 
awareness of the profound seriousness of the issue at hand, and, yet, 
the challenging issues that are involved . . . the challenging possi- 
bilities that are involved in it. To get this matter properly before 
us, we offer a motion in three parts as follows. 

First, that the report of the Theological Study Commission on 
Doctrine and Doctrinal Standards as perfected become Part II of the 
new Book of Discipline. Number two, that it be referred to the annual 
conferences for special consideration, looking toward its study and 
use throughout the churches. Three, that the final ballot on this matter 
be a written, recorded one. 

Dr. Outler introduced Robert W. Thornburg (Central 
Illinois), secretary of the study commission. 



358 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Mr. Thornhurg: Bishop Mueller, fellow delegates and friends, the 
report of the study commission started out to sound like mutual 
admiration societies where everybody loved everyone else, and all 
went with perfect peace and harmony. I should report to you that 
such was not the case in the beginning of the Theological Study 
Commission. Its very diversity of membership and the able, exciting 
and very exhilarating chairmanship of Dr. Outler made sure that 
nothing ever went absolutely straight and clean. We are happy to 
report that what we have before you is the unanimous vote of the 
study commission. In recommending the document become Part II of 
the Discipline we hope to accomplish three things. 

First, that our heritage, in doctrine, be set into the most valuable 
perspective. Second, that we provide a method for United Methodist 
Christians to do theology. Third, that we establish standards and 
norms by which we may judge these efforts and our disputes in them. 
By this process we believe that we may come to an understanding of 
our heritage in the midst of these times, we may identify who we 
are and who we might be to fellow Christians, and most important 
that as pastors and teachers we may aid people, in the words of the 
document, who seek the understanding of their faith, authentic wor- 
ship and celebration, effective evangelical persuasion open to God's 
concern for the world's agonies and turmoils, infusion of that faith 
in life and work, and courageous ministries in support of justice 
and love. 

With that statement, Bishop, we are ready to entertain discussion 
and questions and for the vote on the document. 

Questions on Study Commission Report 

Dean A. Lanning (Northern New Jersey) : I would like to ask if the 
committee would accept a reference to the Resolution of Intent that 
was approved by the General Conference in 1970? Now this Resolution 
of Intent made reference— specific reference to the Articles of Religion 
relating to our understanding of Roman Catholicism at that time. 
But the Resolution of Intent is also a part of our history now and 
some such reference ought to be made. 

Mr. Thornburg: Thank you very much, Mr. Lanning. The discussion 
on this particular issue was very long and very detailed in our com- 
mission. It was our understanding that this sort of footnote, referring 
to where we are at this time and place, should be a part of the 
Book of Resolutions attached to our ecumenical article, and the point 
is well taken and we have considered it ought to be included in that 
latter portion rather than in this portion of the report. 

Mr. Lanning: Could I ask a question then about whether it would be 
possible, if this report is accepted and where it is printed outside of 
the Discipline for study, if either direct reference could be made or 
else that the Resolution of Intent be printed in full in relation to 
the article? 

Mr. Thornburg: Yes. That is both true, as a footnote in this article 
and in all other outside printings it would be a very valuable and 
important suggestion, yes, thank you, sir. 

Victor C. Vinluan (Northwest Philippines) asked a ques- 
tion regarding the study commission's understanding of 
the word "landmark," whether a "landmark document" was 
to be regarded as no longer binding. 



The United Methodist Church 359 

Mr. Thornhurg: The problem I think turns on the understanding of 
the word "landmark." It is not something of the past but a genuine 
guide. We feel that these documents are to be understood in exactly 
the way that Wesley understood them orginally as part of the larger 
heritage. They are to be understood historically but not simply dis- 
carded into the past. The questions of the Discipline that you state, 
I think, would be very relevant, but rather they slip into the larger 
context of both elements of the Restrictive Rule No. 1, the Articles, 
the Confession and the General Rules; and the present established 
and existing standards of doctrine which have to do with all of those 
other parts of our heritage beside the Articles and the Confession. 

Bishop Mueller: Thank you very much; anyone have a question? 
Yes, sir. 

Harold M. Karls (Detroit) : Because of the restrictive rule on the 
general rules, I am concerned that the church at large and those 
who are looking at this doctrinal statement may gain the impression 
that rules are sort of set aside or put into limbo and I am concerned 
that this will be given more importance and more attention than the 
rules. How do we preserve the rules alongside of the doctrinal state- 
ment? 

Mr. Thornhurg: This was precisely the question that we raised with 
the Judicial Council. The first restrictive rule has two very distinctive 
parts. First it says the General Conference shall do nothing to revoke, 
alter or change our Articles of Religion or our Confession or it shall 
add no new doctrine contrary. 

Now the second is quite separate from the first. It shall add no 
new doctrine contrary to our present established and existing standards 
of doctrine. What we are proposing here is a method of interpretation 
which takes our heritage with full seriousness and tries to move out 
with an understanding of our heritage into the world in which we 
live. It is our feeling that we have not added any doctrines that are 
contrary, and obviously we have not altered, revoked or changed the 
text. So we are not in violation of the other restrictive rule we 
think at all. 

Bishop Mueller: Thank you, Dr. Thornhurg. Dr. Harkness. 

Georgia Harkness (Southern California-Arizona) : My first question 
is whether in the study of this document through the annual confer- 
ences it is to be published separately as a brochure or to be widely 
distributed? I assume from something said a moment ago that the 
answer is affirmative, and I hope it is affirmative. 

Mr. Thornhurg: The answer, Miss Harkness, is yes. This is our 
strong anticipation, and it is available to be done immediately. 

Dr. Harkness: Now, my more important question is whether it is to 
be integrated with the Planning for Ministries under the caption of 
"A Basic Priority — A Relevant Living Theology." Again, I hope the 
answer is in the affirmative, because this is a very valuable document 
which could have an immense helpfulness in meeting the problem of 
United Methodist people whose .understanding of theology is alto- 
gether too vague. I have put the question too clumsily but, in brief, 
will it be a part of the Planning for Ministries which has been so 
splendidly set before us? 

Mr. Thornhurg: Your kind words are very helpful, Miss Harkness. 
It is our very great intention and hope that it may be. The two have 
not yet been correlated, since both Planning for Ministry and the 
Theological Study Report have been done separately. I think it would 
be inconceivable that they would not be merged. 



360 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Previous Question 

Don W. Hotter (Kansas East) moved the previous ques- 
tion on all before the Conference. The motion was adopted. 
Dr. Outler reminded the Conference that the study commis- 
sion had asked for a recorded ballot on the report. The 
Chair stated that the Conference then needed to decide 
whether to follow the commission's recommendation on the 
type of ballot to be cast. 

William B. Grove (Western Pennsylvania) asked for an 
explanation of the effect of Judicial Council Memorandum 
No. 353 (see page 688) on the issue of whether the report 
of the study commission would have to be voted on by the 
annual conferences. 

Dr. Outler: The memorandum from the Judicial Council removes 
the decision of the Judicial Council from the status it had before this 
Conference took possession of the document. That, in effect, put the 
document before us as the legislative enactment. 

We are not asking that it should go to the annual conferences as 
a constitutional amendment. We have stipulated in our presentation 
that we do not regard it as in violation of the First, Second or Fifth 
Restrictive Rules. This is a point to our motion that it be referred 
to the annual conferences not as a constitutional amendment for vote; 
but rather for consideration as to how it might be used for optimum 
study and use throughout the churches. 

Mr. Grove: Might the Judicial Council later rule that it is in fact a 
constitutional amendment, or must be? 

Dr. Outler: The answer to that, sir, is that if this Conference so 
directs it may renew the petition to the Judicial Council for declaratory 
judgment. If the Conference does not direct, then the question will 
have to be raised by some other process, if it is thought necessary. 
We do not now think, under the circumstances, that it is necessary. 

Method of Voting 

Walter W. Muller (Central Illinois) moved that the vote 
on the study commission report be by ballot. The motion 
carried. J. Wesley Hole (Secretary) gave instructions for 
taking the ballot. A question was raised as to whether the 
ballots should be signed. The Chair ruled that under Con- 
ference Rule No. 11 the ballots must be signed. 

John R. Van Sickle (Northern Illinois) moved that the 
vote be by secret ballot. The motion was defeated. Woodrow 
Seals (Texas) moved that the ballots be preserved in the 
historical archives of the church. The motion was defeated. 

Judicial Council Decision Request 

William B. Grove (Western Pennsylvania) moved that the 
Conference ask the Judicial Council for a declaratory deci- 
sion as to whether the adoption of the report required a 
constitutional amendment. He spoke on behalf of his motion. 
The motion carried. 



The United Methodist Church 361 

Study Guide Requested 

Calvin R. Myers (East Ohio) moved that the General 
Conference request that the document be published with a 
leader's study guide for use in the local church. He spoke 
on behalf of his motion. Ewart G. Watts (Kansas East) 
asked who was to prepare the leader's guide and requested 
that it be referred to the Program Curriculum Committee 
of the Board of Education for implementation. Mr. Myers 
accepted the suggestion as a part of his motion. Robert W. 
Thornburg (Central Illinois) moved to table the motion. 
He sought to explain his motion to table; George L. Poor 
(Pacific Northwest) raised a point of order that a motion 
to table was not debatable. The Chair ruled that the point 
of order was well taken. The motion to table was put to a 
vote, and the Chair ruled that it prevailed. Mr. Thornburg 
stated that it was the intent of the study commission to 
request the appointment of an Editorial Committee if the 
report was adopted, and that the study guide could be pre- 
pared by the Editorial Committee. 

Earth Week Resolution 

John B. Howes (Central Pennsylvania) presented a reso- 
lution regarding Earth Week. 

Mr. Howes: Whereas, We are meeting here during Earth Week, and 

Whereas, We seek constantly to express our concerns as stewards 
of the material resources with which our world has been blessed, 

Be It Resolved that this General Conference of The United Methodist 
Church reaffirm our dedication to the care of God's holy earth, together 
with the air that surrounds us and the waters of our streams and 
seas that all life, human and nonhuman, be nourished by its riches. 

I move the adoption of this report. If I can have a second, I would 
like to speak only one-half minute in explanation of my purpose. 

Bishop Mueller: It is seconded. 

Mr. Howes: Earth Week came into being under rather meager 
sponsorship but has come to be a time when people of all parts of 
our society are attempting to make a hopeful expression of our 
concern. I wanted to say that our basic concern is not new. You may 
have noticed that I used the term, "the Holy Earth." Dr. Liberty 
Hyde Bailey, the great dean of Cornell University School of Agricul- 
ture, and the Chairman of the first great Roosevelt Country Life 
Commission, gave utterance to this in his book written 60 years ago, 
the book The Holy Earth. 

Some of us have been working away at this ever since. Our con- 
servation forces have been doing a great service. But it has only been 
in the last three years that our whole nation and the world has turned 
its attention to our concern about our environment. Therefore, it 
seemed to me that we could not let Earth Week come to an end 
without our having expressed ourselves, our concern about this matter. 
I hope you will adopt the report. 

The resolution was adopted. 



362 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Election of Board of Governors, 
Wesley Theological Seminary 

John L. Knight, president of Wesley Theological Semi- 
nary, was recognized to present the names of persons 
nominated for election to the seminary Board of Governors. 

Dr. Knight: By way of introduction (and I should state that there 
are forty-four members of the board) the slate of nominees I now will 
read contains twenty-two new names, or exactly one-half of the 
Board. Eleven of the Board, or one-fourth of its membership, are 
alumni. There are six black members, five women, and three bishops. 
In its membership are representatives of ten annual conferences of 
The United Methodist Church. All nominees are members in good 
standing of The United Methodist Church and twenty are delegates 
to this Conference. The names are as follows: clergy members: 

David H. Andrews, Edward G. Carroll, R. Jervis Cooke, John H. 
Dawson, Merrill W. Drennan, John Bayley Jones, Paul E. McCoy, 
Billee S. Mick, Paul E. Myers, William H. Revelle, Jr., Roland P. 
Riddick, Carl J. Sanders, Charles A. Sayre, Robert K. Smyth, Roy H. 
Stetler, Jr., Forrest C. Stith, Prince A. Taylor, F. Norman Van Brunt, 
Fred Wagner, W. Ralph Ward, Raymon E. White, Frank L. Williams. 

Lay Members: Herminia H. Aiken, Marie C. Allnutt, W. Carroll 
Beatty, Larry A. Carr, W. Lloyd Fisher, Doris M. Handy, John H. 
Hessey, Wilma Hollis, Preston T. Holmes, James G. Law, Raymond 
M. Lynch, William C. McElwee, Theodore R. McKeldin, W. Gibbs 
McKenney, Jr., Karl F. Mech, Bradshaw Mintener, A. W. Moore, Jr., 
Thomas C, Roe, Gilbert S. Scarborough, Jr., Daniel Vaughn, Helen 
Wicklein, A. F. Wurzbacher. 

We also have a list of honorary members approved by the board of 
those who have retired or rotated from the board but all who have 
served twelve years with distinction. These honorary members are: 
Hurst R. Anderson, Renah F. Camalier, George P. Chandler, George 
W. Culberson, Bishop Fred G. Holloway, William A. Keese, Edward G. 
Latch, Bishop John Wesley Lord, Bishop Edgar A. Love, Frank L. 
Shaffer, Albert P. Shirkey, Bishop James H. Straughn, J, Vincent 
Watchorn. 

Thurman L. Dodson (Baltimore) moved the election of 
those nominated. Richard O. Johnson (California-Nevada) 
asked how many of those nominated were seminary students. 
Dr. Knight replied that the seminary constitution provided 
that the student body president and the chairman of the 
faculty caucus attend all full meetings of the Board of 
Governors, but that it did not provide for student members 
of the Board. Mr. Johnson moved that the motion to elect 
be laid on the table until the nominations could be printed 
in the Daily Christian Advocate. The motion to lay on the 
table was defeated. The nominees were elected. 

Recycling of Printed Material 

Bevel Jones (North Georgia) made an announcement 
regarding the placement of receptacles for printed material 
to be recycled. 



The United Methodist Church 363 

Methodists Associated Representing Concerns 
of Hispanic Americans 

Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) asked that the 
Conference grant the privilege of the floor to Josafat Curti, 
chairman of MARCHA, for a brief statement. 

Mr. Curti: Understanding is never easy, and history tells only part 
of the story. To know how a man feels, we must sit where he sits, 
we must see life through his eyes; during our journey, we must talk 
with people here and there and ask, "What is it like?" ... 

The great brown giant is awakening . . . Actually it is not as 
sudden as it looks. Its first manifestations began in the period follow- 
ing the Second World War. Hispanic-Americans emerged from that 
conflict with a new determination to make their sacrifice count. No 
ethnic group had received a larger proportion of decorations, and 
few had sustained as large a share of casualties. These veterans 
challenged in and out of court the blatant legacy of discrimination 
still prevailing in the United States, not so much now with glaring 
signs or the brutal words "No Mexicans allowed." It is not the dis- 
crimination of hatred, of overt nature that is so dangerous. However, 
the discrimination the Hispanic-American feels is the systematic, the 
inadvertent, one that is not based on malice, but one that is based 
on a system, systematic discrimination. 

It has been said that discrimination is based on four reasons: 

1. The majority culture makes the policies which affect the minority. 

2. The majority culture assumes that the problems are the fault 
of the minority. 

3. The majority culture assumes that there is no problem until 
it affects the majority peoples. 

4. The majority culture assumes that their way is a superior and 
only way because it is the majority way. 

Politically, economically, educationally and even ecclesiastically 
these are the reasons that have excluded minorities from the oppor- 
tunity and self-determination. Let us just apply these things to the 
church. The church is not different than a political system, an educa- 
tional system. It is sociologically human, and capable of reflecting the 
same feelings of other human institutions that have failed Hispanic- 
Americans for the same reasons. There is no need in proving the 
church's failure to meet the needs of the Hispanic-American. 

Four fairly recent events have combined to transform the invisi- 
bility of twelve million Hispanic-Americans in this country into a 
growing, concrete and problematic presence. One has been the large 
and gallant participation of Hispanic-Americans in this country's 
three latest wars: World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. The Hispanic- 
American being 5% of the national population, he is representative 
of 21<;c of the casualties in Vietnam. If life is precious enough to be 
sacrificed in war, it is precious enough to be respected in peace. 

The second event was the trauma of Fidel Castro in 1959. Suddenly 
Spanish America was rediscovered, not only south, but also north of 
the Rio Bravo or Rio Grande. Overnight, Spanish once again became 
a prestige language, and being bilingual somehow was no longer 
un-American. Then it was realized right away that the credibility of 
a new U. S. policy toward Latin America would be tested to a consider- 
able degree by the treatment accorded the Spanish-speaking in the 
United States. 

The third event was the explosion of the civil rights struggle. To be 
sure, it has been from the beginning focused almost exclusively on 
the black, but its beneficent radiation fall-out contaminated the minds 
of many Hispanic-Americans. We, too, in the manner of Don Quixote, 



364 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

our distinguished ancestor, began once again to dream similar impossi- 
ble dreams. 

The fourth event is Delano, California. A rural Mexican-American 
charismatic, Cesar Chavez, has emerged as the undisputed leader, 
a simple and very human being. Delano has triggered off a phenomenal 
movement of solidarity among rural and urban Spanish-speaking 
citizens, especially in the Southwest. The growing visibility of all 
the Hispanic-American peoples has forced us to realize that "civil 
rights" is something far larger than the tragic struggle of black vs. 
white. For the first time studies are bringing to light what the 
Hispanic-Americans have known and endured all along. More than 
ever the Hispanic-American minority refuses to suffer the stigma of 
underdevelopment and marginality, and asserts its right to participate 
in terms of equality within the mainstream of U. S. society, without 
surrendering its ancestral language or its distinctive social values. 

Brothers and sisters, we must narrow the gap between what we 
profess and what we do. Our community life is largely determined 
by those who exercise power. Hispanic-Americans and other minorities 
are underrepresented in those circles, while often suffering unduly 
from the consequences of decisions taken by the powerful. Without 
paternalism, churchmen, and I am referring to you. United Methodist 
laymen and laywomen, who are in the power structures could build 
bridges so that the voiceless may be heard in the decision-making 
process. 

In many communities with large concentrations of Hispanic-Ameri- 
cans the most influential executives, employers, educators, govern- 
mental officers, and authorities in general are in some way related to 
the Protestant sector. It is remarkable to discover how many are the 
churchgoing kind. One wonders what credibility may accrue to the 
efforts of their respective congregations on behalf of Hispanic- 
Americans when in your communities preferential treatment for 
Anglos continues to be obvious in jobs, promotions, housing, law 
enforcement and educational opportunities. It is a sad sign of the 
times when in order to motivate the new Israel, as had to be done 
with the old Israel, whose ears, dulled by the din of prosperity and 
merriment . . . 

Let me just finish by saying that a large group of Hispanic- 
American visitors have attended this General Conference. And some 
of us are ready to leave. Some have left already because of financial 
situations. But for the first time in history some Annual Conferences 
have elected a few Hispanic-American delegates. Before this Confer- 
ence, before 1972, only Puerto Rico and the Rio Grande Conference 
sent delegates. We Hispanic-Americans have a tremendous great 
expectation from this Conference. We have presented our plight 
to the Council of Bishops last week here in Atlanta. For a long time 
we have been requesting to the church different things that are needed 
for more efficient ministry for Hispanic-American populations. It 
is imperative for the general boards and agencies of the church to 
have Hispanic-American representation in all levels, especially where 
decisions are made. 

There is not one Hispanic-American superintendent outside of the 
Rio Grande and Puerto Rico Conferences. There are thousands of 
United Methodist Hispanic-Americans in the continental United States 
and in Puerto Rico, and still there is not any Hispanic-American 
bishop. A good number of you have said to us privately that these 
requests are honest and right. But, brethren, the time of sympathy 
and promises is past. Do something about it. 

Many of you will be going to Jurisdictional Conferences. Many of 
you are delegates to those Conferences. It will be up to you to elect 
the new bishops. Maybe some of you will commit your vote to a 



The United Methodist Church 365 

favorite son in your conference or your jurisdiction. Brothers and 
sisters, the Methodist Church cannot afford any more to be run 
and guided only by favorite sons. You do have other commitments, 
and especially the South Central Jurisdiction. The South Central 
Jurisdiction has a tremendous moral responsibility. You can make 
history in July of 1972. Millions of Hispanic-Americans in the U. S. 
and in Latin America will be looking upon you in July. 

There are three of our Hispanic-American members as qualified 
as any other of the candidates. And these three, I want to be blunt 
to you, they are running. They want to be bishops. They qualify to 
be bishops. And two of these Hispanic-Americans are in the South 
Central Jurisdiction, and the other candidate is a member of the 
Southeastern Jurisdiction. 

MARCHA, our group, has gone on record, requesting Hispanic- 
American representation in the Council of Bishops. We believe that the 
time has come to elect persons who represent our concerns and persons 
that will save our cultural background and heritage. We do not believe 
in a separated "Spanish-speaking Area" with one Hispanic-American 
bishop in charge. We affirm that a bishop is a bishop, to serve all 
the people, wherever he may be assigned, like any other bishop. We 
believe in pluralism, but we also believe in inclusiveness, and we 
believe in coalitions. 

This is where I finish. The year for you to decide — in July of 1972 — 
this is the year for you to decide about many issues, in April 1972. 
I do not have any doubt in my mind that in this great church of ours, 
we need each other. In the strict sense of reality and in the last 
analysis, YOU need us the most. Thank you very much. 

Results of Ballot 

The Chair announced the results of the ballot on the 
report of the Theological Study Commission on Doctrine and 
Doctrinal Standards: Total votes cast, 946; invalid ballots, 
4 ; affirmative ballots, 925 ; negative ballots, 17. He declared 
the report adopted. 

Benediction 

Bishop W. Maynard Sparks, Seattle Area, pronounced 
the benediction. 



SEVENTH DAY, SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 1972 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening — Bishop H. Ellis Finger 

Pursuant to adjournment, the General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church convened in the morning session 
of the seventh day, Saturday, April 22, 1972, at 8:30 a.m. 
in the Civic Center, Atlanta, Georgia, with Bishop H. Ellis 
Finger, Nashville Area, presiding. 

Memorial Service 

The Conference joined in the singing of the hymn, "For 
All the Saints," followed by a period of silent remembrance 
for the bishops who had died since the 1968 General Con- 
ference : 

Raymond L. Archer, July 4, 1970 
James C. Baker, September 26, 1969 
Newell S. Booth, May 17, 1968 
W. Y. Chen, November 7, 1968 
Matthew W. Clair, Jr., July 10, 1968 
George Edward Epp, May 6, 1970 
Juan E. Gattinoni, January 7, 1970 
Benjamin I. Gaunsing, June 3, 1968 
Walter C. Gum, May 31, 1969 
Odd Hagan, January 28, 1970 
Wilbur E. Hammaker, August 11, 1968 
Costen J. Harrell, November 29, 1971 
J. Ralph Magee, December 19, 1970 
Everett W. Palmer, January 5, 1971 
Glenn R. Phillips, October 6, 1970 
Raymond J. Wade, January 23, 1970 
Herbert Welch, April 4, 1969 

Following a "Litany of Commemoration," there was a read- 
ing from Ecclesiasticus 44 and the reading of the New 
Testament lesson from Hebrews 11:32 — 12:1. Bishop W. 
Kenneth Pope spoke on the subject, "A Cloud of Witnesses" 
(see page 746). The hymn, "How Firm a Foundation" was 
sung. 

Choral selections were presented by the choir of Emory 
and Henry College, Emory, Virginia, under the direction of 
Charles R. Davis. The liturgist was Zan W. Holmes, Jr. 
(North Texas). 

Committee on Journal 

George R. Akers (Wyoming) reported that the committee 
had reviewed the journal of April 21 and found it in good 

366 



The United Methodist Church 367 

order. The report was received. Samuel T. Roberts (Li- 
beria) asked that a correction be made in the reporting of 
a delegate seating change for the Liberia Conference in the 
journal. The Chair asked that the correction be reported to 
the chairman of the Credentials Committee. 

Committee on Agenda 

/. Otis Young, chairman of the committee, referred the 
Conference to the agenda as printed in the Daily Christian 
Advocate. Edward L. Tullis (Kentucky), vice-chairman of 
the committee, moved to amend the agenda as printed to 
provide for sessions of the legislative committees at 2:30 
p.m. instead of a plenary session. He explained that the 
Calendar Committee and the chairpersons of the legislative 
committees were in agreement on the need for this change. 
The amendment was adopted. Mr. Young moved adoption 
of the agenda as amended, and it was approved. 

Committee on Credentials 

W. T. Handy, Jr. (Louisiana) reported that the commit- 
tee had met and examined the changes in delegate seating 
as reported by the chairpersons of annual conference dele- 
gations, and that those approved for the April 21 session 
would appear in proper form in the journal. The report was 
received. Mr. Handy reminded delegation chairpersons that 
reserve delegates to the jurisdictional conferences could not 
be seated officially in the General Conference; he also re- 
quested that changes be certified for at least one full plenary 



Committee on Presiding Officers 

Jack M. Tuell (Pacific Northwest) announced that the 
presiding officers for the Monday plenary sessions would 
be Bishop W. Kenneth Pope, Dallas-Ft. Worth Area, morn- 
ing session; Bishop 0. Eugene Slater, San Antonio Area, 
afternoon session; and Bishop Lloyd C. Wicke, New York 
Area, evening session. 

Committee on Reference 

Jerry G. Bray (Virginia), chairman of the committee, 
reported that fourteen petitions received by the General 
Conference had been received in identical form from about 
1,200 petitioners each. Under the rules of the Conference, 
all 1,200 names would have to be printed in the Daily Chris- 
tian Advocate for each of these fourteen petitions, for a 
total of approximately 14,000 names, addresses and church 
aflfiliations. He noted that the Daily Christian Advocate for 
the day contained the listing for one of these petitions. He 



368 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

asked that Robert G. Mayfield (Kentucky) be granted the 
floor for a statement. 

Mr. Mayfield: We have made inquiries from the General Conference 
Secretary's office, and we find that in listing the names and addresses 
of the petitioners, on the first group of petitions the cost amounted 
to over $1300 to list these names and addresses and took ten pages 
in the Daily Christian Advocate. Now in the interest of expediting 
the business of the Conference and in the purpose of saving money 
of this General Conference we are asking Judge Bray to make a 
motion to suspend the rules in regard to the printing of the names 
of the petitioners on the remaining thirteen groups of petitions. This 
will effect a saving of more than $17,000 for this General Conference, 
and so we urge you to listen to this motion. 

Bishop Finger: Jerry Bray. 

Mr. Bray: If I may make a motion, I move that the rules be 
suspended and that the editor of the Daily Christian Advocate be 
authorized to omit the printing of the names and addresses of the 
signers of the petitions designated B-2500, N-1, D-1, C-1, C-2500, 
D-1400, E-1400, D-3200, L-1, D-7001, J-1. 

The motion was put to a vote, and the rules were 
suspended. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

Mrs. Alvirita Little (Pacific Northwest) moved that an 
expression of concern be sent to Robin P. Hood (Western 
North Carolina), whose mother had died. The motion was 
adopted. 

Mrs. Little announced that greetings had been received 
from Leon T. Moore, former secretary of the General Con- 
ference and moved that the General Conference send its 
greetings to Mr. Moore. The motion was adopted. 

Mrs. Little asked that the privilege of the floor be granted 
to Kathleen L. Haining (Minnesota). Mrs. Haining noted 
that in debate and discussion on the floor of the Conference, 
many delegates were referring to "The Methodist Church." 
She asked that, out of courtesy to former Evangelical 
United Brethren members, delegates refer instead to "The 
United Methodist Church." 

The report of the committee was received. 

Nominations to The Judicial Council — Bishop Roy H. Short 

Bishop Roy H. Short: Mr. Chairman, Members of the Conference. 
The Council of Bishops is required by the Discipline to submit to 
the General Conference nominations for three times the number of 
persons due to be elected to the Judicial Council. The list must 
represent all jurisdictions, plus that part of the church overseas 
from the United States. The terms of four present members of the 
Judicial Council expire this year. The names appear on page 13 of 
the Handbook. The Council of Bishops is presenting, therefore, the 
names of twelve persons, as follows : 

Lay persons: 



The United Methodist Church 369 

Samuel W. Witwer, North Central Jurisdiction 

Francis Hughes, North Central Jurisdiction 

Warren K. Urbom, South Central Jurisdiction 

Floyd Coffman, South Central Jurisdiction 

Mrs. Florence Edwards, Northeastern Jurisdiction 

Franklin C. Stark, Western Jurisdiction 

Ministers : 

Murray Leiffer, Western Jurisdiction 

Hoover Rupert, North Central Jurisdiction 

J. Duncan Hunter, Southeastern Jurisdiction 

Arnold Madsen, Overseas 

Truman W. Potter, Northeastern Jurisdiction 

R. Bruce Weaver, South Central Jurisdiction 

The Chair asked if there were nominations from the floor. 
George W. Cooke (Western New York) nominated Mrs. 
Betty Gundlach (Western New York) . 

Nominations Postponed 

Curt Danforth (Youth Delegation) moved that nomina- 
tions be postponed until the Conference had acted on Peti- 
tion No. M-5005 relative to the deletion of the age require- 
ment for the Judicial Council. Mr. Danforth spoke on be- 
half of his motion. Eivart G. Watts (Kansas East) asked 
the Chair to rule on the eligibility of Mr. Danforth to make 
a motion inasmuch as he was seated with voice but without 
vote. The Chair ruled that Mr. Danforth did not have the 
right to make a motion. Melvin G. Talbert (Southern 
California-Arizona) offered the motion that Mr. Danforth 
had attempted to make. The motion was adopted. 

Robert W. Moon (California-Nevada) asked if it would 
be possible to suspend the rules and consider the calendar 
item at this time. Elias G. Galvan (Southern California- 
Arizona), chairman of Legislative Committee No. 12, stated 
that the committee had acted on the calendar item, and that 
it should be printed in Monday's Daily Christian Advocate. 
Mr. Moon moved that the rules be suspended so that the 
report of the legislative committee could be heard and con- 
sidered at this time. The motion was put to a vote, and the 
Chair ruled that it did not receive the required two-thirds 
majority. 

Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) moved that an order of 
the day be set as early as possible on Monday for considera- 
tion of the calendar item. He spoke on behalf of the motion, 
and it was adopted. 

Committee on Reference 

The Chair noted that he had failed to put the approval of 
the Committee on Reference's report to a vote. The report 
was voted and approved. 



370 Jouimal of the 1972 General Conference 

Commission on the Structure of Methodism Outside the 
United States (see page 1934) 

Bishop Prince A. Taylor (New Jersey Area), chairman 
of the commission, called attention to the commission's 
printed report in the Daily Christian Advocate; he noted 
also that the commission's assignment had been reviewed 
in the Quadrennial Reports. Bishop Taylor explained that 
section II, A was simply a renewal of privileges granted 
to various Central Conferences by previous General Con- 
ferences, and that COSMOS unanimously recommended 
their renewal. Victor C. Vinluan (Northwest Philippines) 
attempted to move an amendment to section II, B, 1 of the 
report ; the Chair ruled him out of order, inasmuch as that 
section of the report had not yet come before the Conference 
for action. Section II, A of the report was put to a vote and 
approved. 

Bishop Taylor presented the commission's recommenda- 
tion (Section II, B, 1) that Costa Rica, Panama Provisional, 
Philippines Central, Sierra Leone, and Taiwan Conferences 
be granted permission to become autonomous. He empha- 
sized that approval of the recommendation would not make 
autonomy mandatory but would only authorize the Con- 
ferences to become autonomous. He stated that if the dele- 
gates from the Philippines wished the recommendation re- 
garding the Philippines Central Conference withdrawn, 
COSMOS would withdraw it. 

Victor C. Vinluan (Northwest Philippines) asked to 
speak in behalf of the motion he had attempted to offer 
earlier; the Chair stated that the motion would now be in 
order and that it should be introduced again at this time. 
Bishop Taylor stated that COSMOS was willing to with- 
draw the recommendation as it related to the Philippines 
Central Conference. Mr. Vinluan stated that several of the 
delegates from the Philippines wished to have a hearing 
with COSMOS before the recommendation was considered. 
The Chair stated that Bishop Taylor, on behalf of COSMOS, 
had withdrawn the recommendation as it related to the 
Philippines Central Conference, and that the report as it 
was now before the Conference made no reference to auton- 
omy for the Philippines. 

Ignacio P. Bautista (Philippines) : May I here, sir, make these 
remarks in connection with the desire of COSMOS to withdraw the 
recommendation permitting the Philippines Central Conference to 
look toward the perfection of autonomy for the Philippines Central 
Conference. 

May I say this, Mr. Chairman, that the several Annual Conferences 
in the Philippines, consisting of six, have voted individually on the 
question of autonomy. Three of the Annual Conferences — the Philip- 
pines Annual Conference to which I belong, the Southwest Philippines 



The United Methodist Church 371 

Annual Conference and the Middle Philippines Annual Conference 
— the three biggest Annual Conferences in the Philippines Central 
Conference, voted unanimously for autonomy. Two other Annual 
Conferences, the Mindanao Annual Conference and the Northern 
Philippines Annual Conference voted against autonomy but with a 
difference of two or three votes. The Northwest Philippines Annual 
Conference, where Brother Vinluan belongs, voted for what they call 
Modified Central Conference. 

I believe, Mr. Chairman, and members of the Conference, that we 
pick out individual votes of the several Annual Conferences. The 
Philippines Central Conference voted overwhelmingly in favor of 
autonomy. 

George L. Poor (Pacific Northwest) raised a point of 
order that the motion Mr. Vinluan had attempted to intro- 
duce was a motion of reference and did not call for the with- 
drawal of any section of the report. The Chair ruled that 
the recommendation regarding autonomy for the Philip- 
pines had been withdrawn by Bishop Taylor, acting on 
behalf of COSMOS. Richard O. Truitt (Wisconsin) raised 
a point of order that when Mr. Vinluan was recognized the 
second time his motion was in order and was properly 
before the Conference. The Chair ruled that it was not, in- 
asmuch as the chairman of COSMOS had withdrawn this 
portion of the report. 

Abdon Mendigorin (Philippines) asked for clarification 
as to whether the chairman of COSMOS was authorized to 
withdraw the recommendation related to the Philippines. 
The Chair stated that it was his understanding that the 
recommendation was being withdrawn at this time, but that 
a recommendation relating to the Philippines would be pre- 
sented to the Conference at a later time. Mr. Mendigorin 
contended that Mr. Vinluan had not presented a valid mo- 
tion related to the question, and that it was therefore in- 
cumbent upon the Conference to vote on the recommenda- 
tion as originally presented by COSMOS. The Chair ruled 
that he was out of order and that the recommendation re- 
lating to the Philippines was not before the Conference. 

Robert F. Lundij (Holston) moved adoption of the recom- 
mendation of COSMOS as contained in their report. Section 
II, B, 1, as it related to the Costa Rica, Panama Provision- 
al, Sierra Leone, and Taiwan Conferences. The motion was 
adopted. The Chair expressed the hope that there would be 
conversations between COSMOS and the delegates from the 
Philippines so that an appropriate recommendation could 
be considered by the Conference at a later time. 

Bishop Taylor presented the commission recommenda- 
tion as contained in Section II, B, 2 of the report. The 
recommendation was approved. 



372 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

Legislative Recommendations — Bishop Lloyd C. Wicke 

Bishop Lloyd C. Wicke, New York Area, presented legis- 
lative recommendations as printed in the COSMOS report, 
section II, B, 3-15, explaining the purpose of the recom- 
mendations. 

Bishop Wicke: We are requesting that COSMOS, as we have 
known it, shall be wound up. Its earlier duties shall be cared for by 
a new structure, and that structure is carefully spelled out. It is a 
structure which involves equal representation from each of the Ju- 
risdictions and each of the Central Conferences. This body will meet 
at the seat and time of the General Conference. 

The interim body, with authority rather limited, will be found in a 
Committee of the Council of Bishops. The arrangements for the ar- 
rival at agreements between Autonomous Churches, United Churches 
and the like, these are then spelled out with considerable care. This 
would include the type of concorded relationship which we are now 
enjoying with our British friends and brethren. 

The position of the Board of Missions, then, is spelled out again 
with a degree of clarity. I believe this provides the main items of 
these agreements. Many of them have been before you at an earlier 
date, you find them here restated in this renewed or new structure. 

Abdon Mendigorin (Philippines) : I am referring to paragraph 9 of 
the report, subparagraph C, which reads as follows: "Such a church 
having more than 70,000 full members shall be entitled to two addi- 
tional delegates, at least one of whom shall be a woman with the 
same rights and privileges." And then the other one also provides the 
same provision in paragraph 13. I would like to have a point of 
clarification regarding this, because I believe that this will be giving 
a new advantage in favor of women delegates from overseas. 

Bishop Finger: Bishop Wicke? 

Bishop Wicke: Mr. Chairman, this is precisely the legislation that 
obtained before, that is at the earlier date and with the general 
COSMOS arrangement. 

Mr. Mendigorin: Mr. Chairman, can we not introduce an amend- 
ment to this in order to delete these provisions? 

Bishop Finger: Yes, do you wish to amend by deleting . . .? 

Mr. Mendigorin: If the Chair wants to send a motion to this 
effect, I so move that we delete the provision regarding ". . . at 
least one of whom shall be a woman . . ." from the provisions just 
read. 

Mr. Mendigorin spoke on behalf of his motion. The mo- 
tion was defeated. 

Bishop Wicke drew attention to the recommendation con- 
tained in section II, B, 3 of the report, which provided that 
the Conference of Bishops be discontinued. 

John R. Van Sickle (Northern Illinois) moved that the 
report of COSMOS be adopted. 

Carroll Long (Holston) : The conference wishes your opinion on 
item 7, in the first paragraph of 234. Was it considered inappropriate 
or was it an oversight that that paragraph relating to the Judicial 
Court did not make provision that members of the Judicial Court 
should not hold other office in the Central Conference? 



The United Methodist Church 373 

Bishop Wicke: No, this is identical legislation to what we've had 
during prior years. There is an exception from the mandate to the 
possibility, from "may" to "shall" in the mandating of the Court. 

Mr. Long: A further question — as I understand it, a person on the 
Judicial Court of the Central Conference could hold other office, 
thereby could possibly be prejudiced. 

Bishop Wicke: To my knowledge, sir, that has never been brought 
in question, I take it was taken for granted. 

Mr. Long: It is true, is it not, that in the Central Conference of the 
Methodist Church in Southern Asia, this does pertain considerable 
question in the minds of the people in this particular Central Con- 
ference as to whether or not the members of the Judicial Court 
could act without prejudice. 

Bishop Wicke: It would be my understanding, sir, that this would 
fall within their power, in the writing of their own Discipline. 

Mr. Long: Thank you, sir. 

Victor C. Vinluan (Northwest Philippines) sought to 
introduce a motion to amend the recommendation contained 
in section II, B, 7 of the report, to provide that decisions of 
the Judicial Court in the Central Conferences be final. The 
Chair ruled that the motion was out of order, inasmuch as 
under the Constitution appeals to the Judicial Council must 
be permitted. 

Theophil H. Gsell (Switzerland-M) asked whether the 
recommendation to discontinue the Conference of Bishops 
meant that overseas bishops would become more and more 
isolated. Bishop Wicke replied that they would not. 

Gilbert H. Caldivell, Jr. (Southern New England) asked 
as a matter of privilege that Mr. Vinluan be permitted to 
make a statement regarding the amendment he had at- 
tempted to introduce. 

Mr. Vinluan: What I am trying to say, Mr. Chairman, is that we 
are now living in the age of the giving of more autonomy or self- 
determination to peoples of the world. And that is what I am trying 
to drive home, brethren, that all decisions that will be made by our 
Judicial Court be final without appealing to the Judicial Council 
— without right of appeal to the Judicial Council, to give more 
autonomy to Central Conferences. That's what I am appealing for 
the body. 

We exist under different situations, different atmospheres from 
what is existing here in America, and so why don't you give us 
final say, final decisions in matters of law without appealing, by 
giving us the right to appeal to the Judicial Council here in America? 

Bishop Finger: Bishop Taylor. 

Bishop Taylor: Now, Mr. Chairman, the provision for an affiliated 
autonomous church or an affiliated United Methodist Church is made 
just for that purpose. The autonomous . . . the Central Conferences 
now have all of the autonomy in this regard they can possibly have 
and still be an organic part of The United Methodist Church. This 
can be obtained by becoming an Affiliated Autonomous Church or an 
Affiliated United Church. 



374 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

George E. Naff (Holston) asked a question regarding 
the recommended legislation in section II, B, 14 (d) and 
(e) of the report. Bishop Taylor responded on behalf of 
COSMOS. 

The motion to adopt the report was put to a vote and 
approved. 

COSMOS Report No. 2 (see page 1941) 

Bishop Wicke asked if the Conference v^ould be willing 
to suspend the rules to permit action on COSMOS Report 
No. 2, which had not been printed and before the Conference 
for the required period of time. There was a motion to 
suspend the rules, and it was approved. Report No. 2 was 
adopted. 

Bishop Taylor introduced J. Robert Martin, staff secre- 
tary of COSMOS, to the Conference. 

Time Extended 

The Chair stated that the time for a recess had arrived 
and asked whether the Conference would extend the time 
to hear a statement from Bishop Muzorewa. The time was 
extended. 

Bishop Abel T. Muzorewa 

Bishop Muzorewa was introduced by Tracey K. Jones, 
Jr., general secretary of the Board of Missions. 

Mr. Jones: Mr. Chairman, prior to the convening of this General 
Conference, the Council of Bishops and the Board of Missions, through 
separate channels, recommended to the Program Committee that Bish- 
op Muzorewa have a chance to speak to this General Conference on 
what he is doing in Rhodesia today and the issues that that country 
is facing. 

When he was elected Bishop in 1968 he never dreamed that within 
three years his voice would be one of the most important voices on 
the continent of Africa. In December of last year, the African 
National Council, a coalition of groups that wanted to provide a 
platform for black Rhodesian African opinions to be presented to 
the British government in their negotiations with the Ian Smith 
government, they asked Bishop Muzorewa if he would be the presi- 
dent. He is a man of strong evangelical faith. He spent three weeks 
in prayer and reflection on whether or not he should accept. He was 
fully aware of the precarious nature of the issues that had to be 
faced and the personal risk that would be involved. He made the 
decision late in December that he would assume this leadership. 

In February he flew to London and on behalf of black Rhodesians 
spoke to the House of Commons. A few days later he was in New 
York, and the Security Council (y£ the United Nations was called 
into special session to hear him, and they heard him for two hours. 
He is in direct communication with the prime ministers of all the 
nations of the British Commonwealth, trying to interpret to them 
the attitude of black Rhodesians. Bishop Muzorewa was . . . both 
his undergraduate and graduate training was in the United States. 



The United Methodist Church 375 

He and Mrs. Muzorewa have five children. The oldest is 19, the 
youngest is 4 years of age. And he returns to Rhodesia following 
this General Conference to continue the leadership of black Rho- 
desians — five million people — in terms of the issues of dealing with 
the British government and the Ian Smith government. And the 
future and destiny, in a sense, of both black and whites in Rhodesia 
today, to no small degree, rests with the leadership of Bishop 
Muzorewa. So it is a real privilege to present him to you as he 
speaks on the issues in Rhodesia and what it means to be a Christian 
Bishop involved in these issues at this time. Bishop Muzorewa. 

Bishop Abel T. Muzorewa: Bishop Finger and the General Con- 
ference. First of all, I want to apologize for the confusion which I 
caused my brothers today, but I want to assure you that I was not 
fast asleep ; I was chatting with the typists at the back. 

I read in one of the newspapers recently where I found myself 
having been referred to as an African Nationalist, and I was quite 
touched by that and I wondered what had happened to me. I started 
asking why an African Nationalist? What have I done this time? 
Who is and what is an African Nationalist? And I found out that 
the definition of an African Nationalist is a human being, a child 
of God, who needs liberation. 

Africa is a wonderful land. Rhodesia is a beautiful country. At 
least the tourists tell us so. Whenever I hear this, I am reminded of 
the beautiful gate of the temple, described in the Book of Acts, 
through which many people passed without seeing the cripple lying 
nearby. These travelers fail to see a crippled nation of 5% million 
Africans who live in misery in the land of their birth. Only a few, 
like Peter and John, see the suffering through Christian eyes and 
see the need for liberation in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth. 
Rhodesia was enslaved as soon as she was colonized, and her 
oppression was accelerated by the Unilateral Declaration of Inde- 
pendence from Great Britain in 1965. Since that time black Rhode- 
sians have been victims of violence, both bloody and bloodless. 

The Rhodesian government proclaims to the world that it is "pre- 
serving civilized standards." It compares its declaration of indepen- 
dence in 1965 to that of the American Colonies in 1776. But we all 
know that the difference is that America was seeking for freedom, 
but over there the intention was to enslave the Africans. What are 
the "civilized standards" which are being preserved in Rhodesia 
today? Here they are: 

— The 5% of the population which is white maintains political 
control over the 95% of the population which is black. 
— Whites elect 50 members of Parliament while Africans elect 8 
under a highly restrictive franchise, and the other 8 are elected 
by chiefs. 

— Every African opposition party formed in the last 14 years has 
been banned. 

^Hundreds of Africans have been arrested, placed in detention 
centers indefinitely under laws that allow for no trial, no statement 
of charges, and no appeal. 

— Thousands have been imprisoned under a wide range of vague 
laws that are interpreted to cover almost any kind of behavior. 
For example, Section 24 of the Law and Order Maintenance Act 
of 1962 states that any person who "behaves in a manner which 
is likely to make some other person apprehensive as to what might 
happen . . ." can be imprisoned for up to ten years. 
— A person is presumed guilty unless he can prove his innocence 
under these laws. But there is never time, usually, to prove one- 
self innocent. 
— Half the land, 45 million acres, is reserved for the use of a small 



376 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

number of white farmers, while Africans are assigned to the other 

half, located in dry or mountainous areas. 

— During the seven-month dry season when no rain falls, hunger, 

malnutrition and disease are widespread. 

— In urban areas, blacks must live in overcrowded townships where 

often 2 or 3 families must share one room. 

— Thousands of unemployed compete for jobs that provide only a 

bare subsistence averaging $26 a month while whites average $300 

a month. 

— The government spends an average of $30 a year for African 

education while it is spending $300 for white children, per child 

a year. 

— Rhodesia's segregation and discrimination legislation form 95% 

prescription of apartheid. They do not have to form new laws to 

have perfect apartheid. All they need is money to implement it. 

But the greatest tragedy of all is the crippling of human dignity 
by a system that constantly denies the sacred value of the individual. 
I ask you, are these the kinds of "civilized standards" that Christ 
calls us to preserve? 

The Christian Church in Rhodesia faced this question early this 
year. In January the British government began considering the recog- 
nition of Rhodesian independence. At this crucial hour, in the absence 
of African political parties, the Church became the channel of expres- 
sion for the voiceless wounded silent majority. Calling for no inde- 
pendence without firm guarantees of freedom and justice for all, 
the Christian Council of Rhodesia met and looked at the Anglo- 
Rhodesian settlement proposal "with a Christian eye," and we all 
agreed that the proposals were not just. 

It was then that some clergymen made up their minds to reject 
that immorality. The five Roman Catholic Bishops, the United Church 
of Christ, and the United Methodist Annual Conference spoke with 
conviction, and rejected them. The British Methodist Church did not 
either reject them nor accept them. The will of the people became 
crystallized in the formation of the new African National Council, 
a grass-roots organization which I serve as President. It united 
people of all organizations, including the formerly banned parties of 
Zapu and Zanu. We are determined to achieve the rule of justice 
through non-violence, negotiation, and reason. 

But the restraint of the people who look to us for leadership has 
its limits. Time is running out. Rhodesia is on a collision course with 
disaster. As a Christian, I ask myself, is there any way to avoid the 
slaughter of hundreds of Rhodesians, black and white? To whom 
can we turn for help? 

I appeal to you, the members of this General Conference, from 
the developing and industrialized nations, to call upon your govern- 
ments for renewed support for United Nations economic sanctions 
against Rhodesia as the strongest and last alternative to bloodshed. 
We are particularly concerned about the violations of these sanctions 
by West Germany, France, Italy and Japan. We know that these 
countries are trading with Rhodesia because of the presence there 
of large numbers of automobiles and electronic equipment that 
originate in these areas. We are especially hurt by the vital moral 
and economic support that the United States is giving the Rhodesian 
government through its purchase of chrome ore. I wonder if my 
American friends are aware of the implication of this in terms of 
our grave need of freedom, relationship present and in future. 

This is the plea of an oppressed and crippled people in the midst 
of a "beautiful Rhodesia." Can you see and hear what we say before 
it is too late? Would you please join us in building a Rhodesia 
commanded to rise up in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, 
where freedom and justice can rule? 



The United Methodist Church Sll 

The church should be complimented for the freedom which has 
come to other parts of Africa. Although some peope give credit to 
communism we should be giving to Christ and His church. We know 
that 90% of educated people in Africa and its leadership are products 
of the church, and we understand that by the end of the century 
about two-thirds of the African population south of Sahara will be 
Christian. We need you, the world church, to surround us with your 
all. 

Our own United Methodist Church in Rhodesia is thriving under 
those oppressive conditions, in particular, beginning with deportation 
of Bishop Dodge and other missionaries from their sacrificial and 
effective witness. The church is growing rapidly in membership, in 
ministerial training; stewardship and evangelism are strong. Rela- 
tionships between missionaries and nationalists is maturing. The 
church is very vital — alive ! 

Are you going to help us to continue to command Rhodesia to rise 
up in the name of Christ? I know you will, for in spite of all of the 
weaknesses and criticisms that are leveled at us or against us of the 
church, we are the best half of Christ on earth today. I love the 
church, I love you all ! Thank you very much. 

Bishop Muzorewa was accorded a standing ovation by 
the Conference. The presentation was concluded with sing- 
ing by a group of Rhodesian delegates. 

Resolution of Support 

Ralph L. Stephens (Northern New Jersey) : In view of the presen- 
tation that has been given before this assembly this morning by 
Bishop Muzorewa, a stalwart of the Church, I move that this General 
Conference convey to the governments of Zimbabwe (Rhodesia) and 
Great Britain the full support of The United Methodist Church of 
the struggles of the peoples of Rhodesia and the African Nationalist 
Council, under the able leadership of Bishop Abel Muzorewa, 

Further, that we request that the Senate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee's repeal of the Byrd amendment be fully supported by this 
government; that repeal would discontinue the importation of chrome 
into this country. And I would like to have Dr. Isaac Bivens, of the 
African Office of the World Division to speak to this concern, if I 
receive a second. 

Isaac Bivens: Bishop, and ladies and gentlemen, the basis for the 
Byrd Amendment, which had the effect of removing sanction from 
the purchase of chrome, had two basic reasons or rationale. One 
rationale was that this country should not purchase strategic military 
materials from any country which was in the Communist bloc, in 
other words, from a so-called free nation. It is rather ironical that 
in this terminology Rhodesia is determined as a free nation. 

The other basis of this action was that chrome itself was a strategic 
material. The irony of this action was that at a time that the Byrd 
Amendment was going through the Senate, there was a concomitant 
action on the part of the House to remove chrome from the strategic 
list and to grant permission to sell 1.3 million tons of chrome on the 
market. The other thing we want to be aware of is the fact that the 
United States in the United Nations three times has exerted its 
moral leadership in support of sanctions against Rhodesia. This action 
of the Byrd Amendment was a telling blow to the significant and 
stalwart efforts of Bishop Muzorewa and the black Africans. 

Mr. Chairman, and ladies and gentlemen, two times I myself and 
two other persons have had conferences with Mr. Perry Wilson, who 
is the chairman of the Board of Directors of Union Carbide, the 



378 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

chief owner and purchaser of chrome from Rhodesia. Just this past 
week we arranged a conference with Mr, Perry Wilson, the chairman 
of that Board, and with Bishop Muzorewa in New York. We are 
asking that company to voluntarily, on the basis of morality, on 
the basis of international law and order, to refuse to purchase 
chrome from Rhodesia. If this action is supported, which is before 
you, it will be acted upon favorably because you will understand 
that we're asking The United Methodist Church to place the weight 
of its moral persuasion and commitment behind Bishop Muzorewa 
(ANC), the precept of international law and order, and in support 
of this church's historic declaration in support of universal freedom. 
Bishop Finger: Thank you. The motion is before you. If you will 
support it, will you lift a hand? Thank you. Those opposed? And 
it is supported. 

Order of the Day 

J. Otis Young, chairman of the Committee on Agenda, 
stated that the committee recommended that an order of the 
day be set for the service in memory of Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr. immediately upon return from the recess period. 
The recommendation was approved. 

The Chair recognized that there were a large number of 
United Methodist youth visiting the Conference for the 
weekend. The Conference was in recess for fifteen minutes. 

Following the recess Carlton Yoimg led the Conference 
in the singing of "Lord, I Want To Be a Christian." 

Commemoration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

A. C. Epps (North Georgia) introduced Gordon G. 
Thompson, Jr., who offered a prayer. Mr. Epps asked Wil- 
liam H. Ruff (North Georgia) to present Paul Webb, Jr. 
(North Georgia). 

Mr. Webb: Mr. Chairman and members of the Conference, it 
is my privilege now to present one who is close to the man that we 
are here to honor this morning. "As the twig is bent, so shall the 
tree grow." We all admired the leadership of Dr. King, Jr. It has 
been my privilege to be a personal friend of his father for some 25 
years. 

We have stood in the trenches together, we have fought the battles 
and I have observed this man. There is no question but that a son 
who grew up in this home would have achieved the eminence that 
his son did achieve. It is my pleasure now to present to you a minister 
of the gospel who was called by his church 41 years ago. These are 
not Methodists. They don't have to take the pastor sent by the 
Bishop and council; but for 41 years this man has served his flock 
on Auburn Avenue at Ebenezer Church, and I present Dr. Martin 
Luther King, Sr., my friend. 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. was accorded a standing 
ovation by the General Conference. 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr.: Thank you very much, I did not 
know that I would be presented and I'm sorry that we didn't get 
clear connections on last evening. I was told that we would be here 



The United Methodist Church 379 

at 10:30, and I was here. I'm sorry about the delay and the mis- 
understanding. 

Mr. Chairman and bishops of the Church, delegates in attendance 
on this Conference, I am delighted to see you and be privileged to 
greet you briefly and to give you a sense of welcome to Atlanta 
where I have been for many years in the part of the growth of this 
city. 

But let me rush to say to you briefly I am not bitter; I do not hate 
any man. I think that if anyone could, certainly I would be one of 
those who could carry ill will in my heart. I refuse to do this. I am 
on record of being every man's brother no matter the color of your 
skin, the texture of your hair, or where you live or what you know, 
or whether you are high and mighty or just simply the least of these, 
I am every man's brother. 

Now I do not debate this with any man whether or not he accepts 
me as his brother. I do not have time to debate this nor dialogue 
about it. I have a job to do every day I live and never get through 
with any job that I must do within that one day. I do not have the 
time to debate this with anybody; I'm going on with my job every 
day, going on being every man's brother. I love you, everyone of 
you. I hope you love me. 

Yes, I'm stunned. Yes, I feel it deeply — the loss of my sons. I only 
had two sons, you know, one who was assassinated and the other 
one in less than two years was drowned. But I'm going on and see 
what the end is gonna be. I've been preaching, soon it will be . . . and 
pastoring, 56 years, and I haven't retired yet. I've tried three times 
and it seems the Lord doesn't want it, so I'm going on a little longer. 
It's good to see you, it's good to be with you these brief moments. 

I'd like for you to see Martin Luther King, III. Next to Scott King, 
also, the second son. They are glad to be here. Martin, you tell them 
"Hello" and then we are going to be out of the way. Mrs. Coretta King 
had a rush call to New York yesterday and is in Washington today; 
thus she was unable to attend. My wife moves as she feels, and I 
have learned that I must live with that lady; I've been with her 46 
years, and I can't be without her now. 

Martin Luther King, III: I would just like to say "hello" for all 
of my family and I'm glad to be here today. 

Mr. Epps presented Bishop Noah W. Moore, Jr., Ne- 
braska Area, who delivered the memorial meditation for the 
service of commemoration (see page 754) . 

Carlton Young led the Conference in the singing of "We 
Shall Overcome." 

Committee on Calendar 

Robert E. Goodrich, Jr. (North Texas), chairman of the 
committee, presented the other two members of the com- 
mittee, Mrs. Paul Braun (Iowa) and Wayne Calbert (Mis- 
sissippi-FCJ). He called for reports on calendar items 
from the Legislative Committee on Christian Social Con- 



Motion — Reporting of Non-concurrence Items 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) moved that non-concurrence 
items from legislative section calendars be reported by the 



380 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

legislative committee chairpersons as they are prepared 
rather than waiting for an all-inclusive non-concurrence 
motion at the end of the Conference. He spoke in behalf of 
his motion. John T. King (Southv^^est Texas) spoke in op- 
position to the motion. The motion was defeated. 

Committee on Christian Social Concerns — Report No. 2 — 
Calendar No. 58 

Edsel A. Ammons (Northern Illinois) presented the re- 
port. Richard D. Tholin (Northern Illinois) spoke on be- 
half of the report. 

Mr. Tholin: Bishop Finger, fellow Christians, the United Methodist 
Church has begun to take seriously the lordship of Jesus Christ over 
all of its actions, including its investments. In 1970 the General 
Conference called upon all institutions, all boards of The United 
Methodist Church to look at their investments and to make those 
investments w^ork positively toward the realization of the goals in 
the Social Principles. Two days ago this General Conference, as a 
part of the Bishops' Call to Peace, asked that we examine and use 
our investments to make a specific contribution to the ending of war 
on the face of the globe. When we make such general commitments, 
our Lord has a way of beginning to confront us with specific decisions. 
We are now faced with specific decisions, that arise out of that 
general commitment. We will become specific just as we were an 
hour or so ago in regard to Rhodesia. 

Why this issue? During this week there has been a slideshow 
presented which we hope most of you have been able to see. It has 
portrayed graphically probably the most inhumane and unjust aspect 
of an already tragic and unjust war in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia 
— the use of Western technology in such a way that it can make no 
distinction between men, women, children and soldiers; sensors which 
detect persons moving day and night; high level bombing over large 
pattern areas; antipersonnel weapons which spray whole territories 
with pellets; or even worse, plastic darts which cannot be detected 
by x-ray; leaf bombs that drop over areas, that anyone walking 
there, for months to come will have a foot blown off", will not be 
killed necessarily, but will be maimed; bombs which will not even 
blow out a tire of a truck passing over them, anti-personnel bombs. 

This is part of a weapon system that is able to destroy man, the 
sacred traditions of people, the fabrics of their society, and move 
populations over the earth and never, ever see a human face while 
doing it. And why these companies? There has been extensive research 
done by many agencies, and it is quite clear that these are major 
corporations, not small companies, and that these four major corpora- 
tions provide basic systems for the military. 

They are not the only ones; they are primary ones. And they have 
extensive investments from The United Methodist Church boards. 

These companies put together the basic components of the auto- 
mated air-war system. Standard Oil of New Jersey provides the 
fuel and some of the research on antipersonnel weapons. IT&T pro- 
vides the sensors in communications. GE provides the plans and the 
gunships, and Honeywell provides anti-personnel bombs and com- 
puters and weapons. And why these companies? Because there are 
others among religious people who met together in ecumenical witness 
in January across the religious community who decided that we must 
begin somewhere, not that these are the only companies, but we can 



The United Methodist Church '381 

begin here where the weapons are clearly wrong, and we can make 
a Christian witness to these companies. 

It makes no difference what percentage of their products these are; 
if they are wrong we should not be a part of them unless we register 
our protest and seek to change those companies' policies. What is 
being asked in this proposal is not immediate divestment, not simply 
walking away so that we can be pure, but it is to enter into an 
extended struggle of at least a year with these companies in public 
witness and negotiation along with others across the religious com- 
munity to help them come to the decision that they can no longer 
make such weapon systems. 

And we do this out of our own desire to witness to the love of 
God for all people everywhere. It is for this reason that this is 
before you. 

Tom Reavley (Southwest Texas) : Mr, Chairman and members of 
the Conference, I am the vice-chairman of the Committee which is 
now reporting and they . . . yesterday a minority report was signed 
by the requisite number of the members of the Committee on this 
matter, and I had hoped that we could handle it as a Minority Report 
under the rules, but that is no matter, let me just speak against 
concurrence. 

Let me say this; this is the first issue on the calendar, first resolu- 
tion or action of any controversy, I suppose. As we begin it, I would 
say that if the General Conference and the general church is to 
maintain respect among the congregations of United Methodism, we 
must frame our pronouncements with very great care, and as we 
vote, each of us must exercise great care. Now, this resolution names 
four corporations. It calls upon them to stop supplying the armed 
forces with materials, computers, gasoline and so forth used in the 
air war. 

Our bishops, our general secretaries are to appear at stockholders 
meetings and demand this in the name of The United Methodist 
Church, and then all United Methodists and bodies of the Church are 
called upon to protest to the corporations and persuade them to stop 
production. There is no discrimination, no exception. All of this be- 
cause material, any material, is sold to the United States Armed 
Forces. I am not prepared to condemn anyone for this reason without 
more showing than that and, nor would I single out and name a few 
companies out of thousands and give them this adverse publicity. 
I think it's unfair and unjustified and I'll vote against the motion. 

Harold A. Bosley (New York) : I think we ought to have clearly 
in mind two things. The first is the more important. We are re- 
sponsible for where our money goes. We in this General Conference 
are responsible for what our money buys. We have a moral respon- 
sibility, wherever we are able to do so, to follow that money with 
whatever judgments we are capable of bringing to bear upon it. I 
should suppose that this principle is not really open to debate. I 
should suppose that we would accept this almost without discussion. 

The second point I want to make is this, as ought to be a matter of 
common knowledge in this body, there is a sense of aroused con- 
science among other churches and educational institutions on this 
matter. The bishops of the Episcopal Church have had representa- 
tives at the stockholders' meeting of several large corporations of 
late. Their protest against certain policies of these corporations has 
been duly reported in the public press. To be sure, they got canned 
by some of the people back home. I am not sure all of the people 
back home deserve to be put in one category. There is enough division 
among us on this point for an honest debate to ensue. 

Also you may have seen where the Board of Trustees or Overseers 
of Yale University have decided, as of the last two months, to see to 



382 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

it that there is a committee to investigate the portfolio of their 
university and to follow that portfolio from point of view of the 
conscience of humanity. The man who made the motion that this 
be done was the dean of the Law School at Yale University, and 
he is the chairman of the committee to see that it is carried out. 

The point I want to make, members of this General Conference, is 
that we are beginning to turn a corner on the point of moral responsi- 
bility for what we are, what we say and what we do, and this 
represents a good beginning. If we are doing an injustice to these 
four companies, let them get out of the armament business. One 
other point, if our study is incomplete, let us complete it. Thank you. 

The Chair noted that if consideration of this report were 
to continue, the time would have to be extended. The Con- 
ference voted to extend the time. Wilham A. Meadows 
(Florida) spoke in opposition to the report. 

Mr. Meadows: Mr. Chairman, my fellow delegates, I speak in op- 
position to concurrence. I join in the argument of Judge Reavley and 
say in addition to that that if we are in this Conference to continue 
for the next few days, to consider matters that we have already voted 
upon, then I say that we will not complete the business of the Con- 
ference. We voted, and I voted yesterday with the rest of you, in 
favor of the Bishops' Call for Peace, and in that call and in that 
decision yesterday, we voted on the very matters which are now 
before us and I submit to you that this . . . there is nothing to be 
gained by us to continue to consider this matter. 

Further, in opposition to the motion, I say, that it is very difficult 
for me to make a decision on a petition such as this without having 
much more expert information. And I say that the motion . . . the 
decision that we made yesterday adequately expresses the view- 
point of this Conference. I say to you, my fellow delegates, that by 
voting against this motion to concur that you in no way, and I submit 
to you, in no way does this mean that you are opposed to peace. 

I agree that peace is a number one issue, but if we are to deal 
with peace, then I suggest we need to concentrate our efforts in 
prayer for the governmental leaders of this world that Christ's 
spirit might prevail. Thank you. 

Paul J. Beeman (Pacific Northwest) moved to amend 
the report by deleting the names of the specific companies 
listed in it. He spoke on behalf of his amendment. W. Jene 
Miller (Oklahoma) spoke in opposition to it. Arthur S. Mer- 
row (Western New York) spoke in favor of the amend- 
ment. John V. Moore (California-Nevada) argued against 
the amendment. 

John R. Van Sickle (Northern Illinois) moved the previ- 
ous question on all before the Conference. The motion was 
approved. 

The Chair called for the vote on Mr. Beeman's amend- 
ment. James S. McCartt (Holston) asked a question regard- 
ing the exact wording of the amendment. Leroij C. Hodapp 
(South Indiana) asked for clarification as to how the dele- 
tion of the names of specific corporations would affect item 
2 in the report. Mr. McCartt asked if it would be possible 



The United Methodist Church 383 

for the Conference to have the specific wording of all sec- 
tions of the report that would be affected by the amend- 
ment. Kenneth Cooper (Alabama-West Florida) desired 
to offer an amendment to Mr. Beeman's amendment but 
was ruled out of order. Mr. Cooper again raised the ques- 
tion of the effect of the amendment on item 2 of the report. 
Mr. Beeman stated that it was his intention in offering the 
amendment to remove both the references to specific com- 
panies and the references to a specific number of companies 
so that the entire report would read in more general terms. 
Mr. Cooper addressed a question to Mr. Beeman, and Mr. 
Beeman responded. The Chair recognized a representative 
of the legislative committee for a concluding statement. 
William L. Sharp (North Mississippi) raised a point of 
order that the previous question had been voted and that no 
further debate was permitted. The Chair stated that under 
the rules the committee presenting the report had the privi- 
lege of making a statement before the vote was taken. 

Mr. Tholin: I would remind again this General Conference that 
in the debate over this matter, that no one denied the effect of these 
weapon systems upon men, women and children in the land of South- 
east Asia. No one denied that these companies produced such wea- 
ponry; no one denied that we have extensive investment in those 
corporations. In General Electric our general board has more than 
$8,000,000 of investments, in Honeywell over a $1,500,000, in Stan- 
dard Oil of New Jersey almost $2,500,000, in IT&T almost a $1,500,- 
000, using the latest published figures which were available from our 
board. 

What is at issue is should we name specific companies? And there 
is no way for us to witness in general; there is no way to be re- 
conciled in general. One witnesses to specific actions and specific per- 
sons, or it becomes a vague effort at self -justification but not a real 
witness, and no possibility of real reconciliation is possible unless we 
deal with real people. 

The whole problem with the automated air war is that we are 
dealing through abstractions but killing people, and we are saying in 
this motion that it is time that we speak to real people who run real 
corporations with names and that we speak to them with our convic- 
tions, not to destroy their companies — we will not destroy their 
companies — but to help them make their companies what they in their 
hearts know they ought to be and to bear that Christian witness 
where it will count, for the decisions are made at their annual meet- 
ings. 

If we name these companies and if we negotiate with them and 
there is change, there will be other companies, and we may begin to 
make a dent in the system which destroys us and many people, and 
we can go one by one, but we do it specifically to real people. I would 
urge you to vote down the amendment, to vote the original motion. 

The amendment offered by Mr. Beeman was put to a vote, 
and the Chair ruled that the amendment was defeated. 

Torrey A. Kaatz (West Ohio) asked whether the legis- 
lative committee would be bringing another report dealing 
with the war in Indochina. Mr. Tholin stated that there 



384 Jouryial of the 1972 General Conference 

were omnibus resolutions on Southeast Asia, amnesty, and 
ministry to war prisoners. 

Thomas Bryant (South Indiana) desired to make a com- 
ment but was ruled out of order by the Chair. 

Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) requested a count vote on 
Mr. Beeman's amendment. The request was supported by a 
vote of the Conference. J. Wesley Hole (Secretary) gave 
instructions for the taking of the ballot. Don J. Hand 
(Southwest Texas) asked whether the ballots should be 
signed. The Chair stated that they could be either signed or 
unsigned. James S. McCartt asked for clarification as to 
whether this was a ballot on the amendment, and the Chair 
stated that that was correct. Robert E. Knupp (Central 
Pennsylvania) asked whether it would be possible to hear 
the Order of the Day scheduled for 12 noon while the ballot 
was being completed ; the Chair stated that the ballot must 
first be completed. Richard Pittenger (South Dakota) asked 
a question. J, Wesley Hole (Secretary) made announce- 
ments. Kenneth W. Hunt (West Ohio) made a statement 
regarding attendance at legislative committee sessions. Cal- 
vin R. Myers (East Ohio) asked a question. 

The Chair announced the results of the count vote on 
Mr. Beeman's amendment : total vote cast, 953 ; voting yes, 
558; voting no, 395. The amendment was adopted. The re- 
port as amended was put to the vote, and it was adopted 
(seepage 1040). 

Commission on Ecumenical Affairs 

Bishop Paul A. Washburn (Minnesota Area), president 
of the commission, presented the report. 

Bishop Paul Washburn: Mr. Chairman and delegates, may I read 
a letter which we received from the National Conference of Catholic 
Bishops, while the friends are coming to the platform. This letter is 
signed by Joseph L. Bernadine, the general secretary of the National 
Conference of Catholic Bishops : 

"It is my pleasure to forward to you the enclosed copy of a resolu- 
tion adopted unanimously by the National Conference of Catholic 
Bishops meeting in Atlanta on April 11." And I want to read the 
resolution. 

"WHEREAS, The Council of Bishops of the United Methodist 

Church is meeting on St. Simons Island as we meet in Atlanta and, 
"WHEREAS, The General Conference of the United Methodist 

Church will open its meeting in this city as ours closes and, 

"WHEREAS, The crossing of our paths at this time happily 

reminds us the many gracious contacts that have multiplied and 

grown between our communities in recent times, 

"BE IT RESOLVED, that the National Conference of Catholic 

Bishops take this occasion to send brotherly greetings in the name 

of the Lord to the assemblies of The United Methodist Church 

expressing our best wishes for the success of their deliberations 



The United Methodist Church 385 

in behalf of the Christian people and our common efforts in the 

service of the Gospel." 

I think it would be appropriate, Mr. Chairman, if there would be 
some provision for a response to this resolution. 

Bishop Finger: Without objection, we will ask the Secretary of the 
General Conference to respond to this very gracious communication. 

Bishop Washburn called attention to three petitions 
which were a part of the commission's report and noted that 
they had been considered by legislative committees and 
would be reported by those committees. He presented Robert 
W. Huston, general secretary of the commission, to the Con- 
ference. 

Mr. Huston introduced the delegates and reserve dele- 
gates to the Conference who had been designated by the 
commission as ecumenical associates: Richard W. Cain 
(Southern California-Arizona), Robert W. Thornburg 
(Central Illinois), /. Robert Nelson (East Ohio), and Paid 
M. Mi7ius, Jr. (West Ohio). He then asked the bishops, 
members of the Council of Secretaries, delegates and re- 
serve delegates who were members of the commission to 
stand and be recognized. 

Bishop Washburn introduced Dr. Cynthia Wedel, presi- 
dent of the National Council of Churches, to the Conference. 

Dr. Wedel: Thank you very much, my dearly beloved Methodist 
friends. I have a perfectly marvelous 45-minute speech on the virtues 
of the National Council of Churches which I'm not going to give. 
You can read about it, you can read all about the National Council 
and how fine it is and many of the things that we do together in the 
May issue of The Interpreter, and many of you know anyway. 

All I'd like to do very briefly, because I have deep sympathy for 
your presiding officer, being often in this spot myself, is to say very 
quickly that I trust you realize as firmly and as strongly as I do, as 
most of the member churches in the National Council do, as our 
friends in the Roman Catholic Church are beginning to recognize 
very clearly, that in the kind of a world in which you and I live and 
in a day such as this, it is absolutely impossible to fulfill our Chris- 
tian commitment alone, either alone individually or alone as a 
denomination. 

To me, the Christian commitment is, first of all, obedience to God; 
secondly, witnessing to Jesus Christ; and, thirdly, serving our fellow- 
men. It seems perfectly clear to anyone who is reading the signs of 
the times that from the early days of this century and with in- 
creasing force, God has been calling his church together. The 1937 
Edinburgh Faith and Order Conference had as its theme, "God Wills 
Unity," and I believe redemptive Christians around the world are all 
clear that God and his Holy Spirit are moving among us in this day 
to carry out the will of God, that his church may be one that the 
world may believe. 

I am convinced that we cannot be obedient to God without being 
involved in ecumenical concerns, ecumenical action, working together. 
We know, increasingly, that we cannot witness to Jesus Christ in 
this kind of a large, highly organized, technological world if we 
try to witness as fragments of the Body of Christ, even very large 
fragments like The United Methodist Church. 



386 Journal of the 1972 General Conference 

I was thinking this morning, as you took your action about 
Rhodesia and as you were taking the kinds of action you've just been 
debating, that when the great United Methodist Church, which is, of 
course, by far the largest church in the National Council of Churches, 
takes an action like this, there will be some notice in the papers, it 
will be known by some of your own members, but I don't think it's 
going to cause very much of a stir. 

But, if in June, at the next meeting of the General Board of the 
National Council, your Methodist delegates bring in some of these 
actions to be, in a sense, acted upon jointly by all of the churches, 
and this frequently happens, if the National Council of Churches, 
the churches represented there, vote, I'd be willing to bet we'll get 
some headlines and lots of flak. While it's painful to be criticized and 
objected to for the things we do, as the National Council and the 
World Council frequently are, more and more we are realizing we 
only get this kind of complaint and criticism when the church is 
being really eff"ective in its witness. And, therefore, we're glad to take 
it because we're proud of the reason for it. And I hope you feel this 
way too. 

And, thirdly, if we're going to serve our fellowmen in this kind 
of a world — those in need, those who are suffering, in all parts of 
the world — again, not one of us as a church has the resources or the 
manpower or the ingenuity to know how it should best be done.